If you’ve been to the health food store lately, you’ve seen shelves lined with vitamins and “organic” supplements, each claiming to boost immunity, revitalize organ function, or “promote health.” And it’s working. Supplements are currently a $30 billion industry in the US, with more than 90,000 products on the market, and vitamin use is on the rise. In fact, a recent survey in Journal of American Medicine Association showed that “52% of US adults reported use of at least 1 supplement product.”
Catuaba (Erythroxylum catuaba): in Brazil, Catuaba Extract is considered to be a central nervous system stimulant (5), without the side effects of caffeine. This is used in some Asian remedies for sexual weakness and lowered libido. European herbalists have found that Catuaba may have aphrodisiac properties and can be used to combat sexual weakness.
Ginseng is generally indicated for daily, consistent use in moderate doses. Do not use ginseng as a short-term stimulant. Ginseng and other adaptogens work best after long-term (one–three months) use by regulating hormone levels and other biological functions to protect us against the damaging effects of chronic stress,” says herbalist Christopher Hobbs, author of The Ginsengs. A typical dose is 4,000–6,000 mg per day.
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The study was conducted between April 2000 and March 2003 in western Uganda. To collect this data indirect asking of questions and investigations that do not refer or offend anyone were used since nobody especially men can say openly that they have this problem. These methods are explained in the textbook of ethnobotany and others have been used in the field for this kind of studies in Uganda and elsewhere in the world10,12,13,14,21. These methods included visiting the traditional healers to document the indigenous knowledge (IK), regarding medicinal plants used, gender and socio-cultural aspects and where the plants are harvested. Informal and formal conversations, discussions and interviews, market surveys and field visits were conducted.
The Plant: A low-growing flowering annual that’s originally from southern Europe but is now an invasive weed in parts of the United States and Australia. The plant’s common names, like puncturevine or devil’s thorns, tells you exactly why most people hate it: it drops sharp, spiny seed pods that lie in wait for unsuspecting victims to step on them. It’s also toxic to grazing livestock like sheep.

Epimedium extract (Horny Goat Weed) (11), (Figure 9): the Chinese refer to this herb as ‘yin yang huo’, which has been loosely translated as ‘licentious goat plant’; hence, its common name is well known as ‘horny goat weed’ by many Western cultures. Scientifically, studies have shown that Epimedium may restore low levels of both testosterone and thyroid hormone, bringing low levels back to their normal levels (5), which may account for some of its benefits in improving sexual libido. Other benefits to Epimedium involve increased muscle mass. Used for fatigue and aging, And vasodilatation effect; thus, most frequently used in treatment of sexual dysfunction in Traditional Chinese Medicine (12). The active substance from horny goat weed was reported by Xin Zhong Cheng at Beijing Medical University as Icarin—acts by increasing sexual activities and ICP levels in castrated rats after long term oral administration. It has no effects on serum testosterone level in castrated rats after long term oral administration. Instead Icariin increases nNOS and iNOS mRNA and protein expression in the corpus cavernosum after long term oral administration and hence may have long term efficacy on erectile dysfunction after oral administration.

Much of the evidence shows high rates of vitamin D deficiency in patients with erectile dysfunction. In fact, one study of 3,400 participants found that men with vitamin D deficiency were 32% more likely to have trouble with erections when all other risk factors were controlled for. It’s a little on the nose that you need vitamin D for your “D,” but hey—science can be funny too.


Ginkgo biloba. Known primarily as a treatment for cognitive decline, ginkgo has also been used to treat erectile dysfunction -- especially cases caused by the use of certain antidepressant medications. But the evidence isn't very convincing. One 1998 study published in the Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy found that it did work. But a more rigorous study, published in Human Pharmacology in 2002, failed to replicate this finding. "Ginkgo has come out of fashion in the past few years," says Ronald Tamler, MD, assistant professor of medicine and codirector of the men's health program at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City. "That's because it doesn't do much. I can say that in my practice, I have not seen ginkgo work -- ever."
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