Yohimbine: The main component of an African tree bark, yohimbine is probably one of the most problematic of all natural remedies for ED. Some research suggests that yohimbine can improve a type of sexual dysfunction that is linked with a drug used to treat depression. However, studies have linked yohimbine to a number of side effects, which can include anxiety, increased blood pressure, and a fast, irregular heartbeat. Like all natural remedies, yohimbine should only be used after advice and under supervision from a doctor.
Due to its ability to inhibit actions of the sympathetic nervous system, yohimbe can help to bring blood pressure levels back to balance. This is is why it’s used to sometimes increase blood flow, such as to tissues of the reproductive organs.  Or, also why it’s used to treat hypotension (abnormally low blood pressure). It may also be helpful for stimulating nerves and treating fatigue or symptoms of depression.
If you’ve been to the health food store lately, you’ve seen shelves lined with vitamins and “organic” supplements, each claiming to boost immunity, revitalize organ function, or “promote health.” And it’s working. Supplements are currently a $30 billion industry in the US, with more than 90,000 products on the market, and vitamin use is on the rise. In fact, a recent survey in Journal of American Medicine Association showed that “52% of US adults reported use of at least 1 supplement product.”
Yohimbe can interact with several drugs and medications, so it’s not safe for everybody to use. Don’t take yohimbe bark if you’re currently taking any ACE inhibitor drug, beta blocker, SSRI drug, MAOI, stimulants or caffeine-containing drugs, or tricyclic antidepressant drugs. Those who have any of the conditions listed below should not take herbal treatments like yohimbe without speaking with a doctor first. This is because it may affect things like blood pressure, heart health, kidney function and neurotransmitter functions:

In the United States, certain prescription drugs containing yohimbine have been approved since the 1980s. They are labeled Yohimbine hydrochloride (which go by the brand names Aphrodyne or Yocon). Yohimbine medications are prescribed most commonly to treat sexual dysfunction in both men and women caused by a number of factors like aging, hormonal imbalances or side effects of medications.


Researchers at Johns Hopkins University last year looked at 3,400 healthy Americans and found that men who were vitamin D deficient were 32% more likely to have trouble getting it up than those with sufficient levels, even after adjusting for other ED risk factors. In fact, the connection is so common, Walker says D levels are something he always checks in ED patients. Why? The sunshine vitamin is crucial for keeping the endothelial cells that line blood vessels healthy. Without enough of the stuff, blood flow is inhibited, affecting everything from your heart to your hard-on.
I use magnesium and zinc. I don’t find any difference with zinc but about 10 minutes after I pop a magnesium I’m all ready to go! But diet comes first! I went vegan about 10 weeks ago (and I’ll never look back) but I also quit my hormonal birth control about 3 weeks ago so my sex drive is at a big fat ZERO. But like I said, when I take a magnesium it still manages to come back. Mine you, I have a boyfriend who I’ve been with for 4 and a half years and I have so much love for him! But I wanna feel sexy everyday! I am losing weight so that will help and I’ve heard amazing things about Pine Pollen (tinture for men and powder for women) check it out! 🙂
According to the FDA (Food and Drug Administration), many of these products sold on the internet contain potentially harmful compounds. And they aren’t listed on the label. In an investigation, the FDA found that one-third of these online supplements were laced with undisclosed ingredients. This includes sildenafil—the active ingredient in Viagra. Doctors prescribe Viagra to some patients, but it’s not safe for everyone. The drug could interact with other medications and lower your blood pressure to dangerous levels. This makes ordering supplements online risky. You don’t know whether they contain sildenafil or other ingredients that could harm your health. 

There are so many potential reasons a man might develop erectile dysfunction (ED), it's nearly impossible to generalize the best ways to treat it. What works for one man may not work for another simply because they are having problems for different reasons. That said, it may encouraging to hear that there are a variety of options that may be considered, from psychological counseling to lifestyle changes, medications to treatments and devices.
A study from 1990 (eight years before Viagra was introduced) found that sedentary but otherwise healthy middle-aged men who started an intense aerobic exercise program reported higher levels of sexual intimacy, and more reliable sexual function. Men in the study who started a walking program also experienced improvements, though not as dramatic. But the bottom line is, improved physical fitness often improves sexual functioning and satisfaction. Here are 5 exercises that can help with erectile dysfunction.
A study published in the journal Fertility and Sterility that analyzed the effect of various fruit and vegetables on sperm quality discovered carrots had the best all-around results on sperm count and motility—a term used to describe the ability of sperm to swim towards an egg. Men who ate the most carrots saw improved sperm performance by 6.5 to 8 percent. The Harvard researchers attribute the boost to carotenoids, powerful antioxidative compounds in carrots that help the body make vitamin A.
Talk with your doctor about going to a counselor if psychological or emotional issues are affecting your ED. A counselor can teach you how to lower your anxiety or stress related to sex. Your counselor may suggest that you bring your partner to counseling sessions to learn how to support you. As you work on relieving your anxiety or stress, a doctor can focus on treating the physical causes of ED.

Moreover, it has a positive effect on the nervous system, liver, skin, and mucous membranes, as well as keeps skin, nails, and hair healthy. And of course, what is important for men, erectile dysfunction treatment with vitamin B2 relieves symptoms of the most hateful male disease. Moreover, this vitamin is well-known as a supplier of sexual energy and vitality.
DHEA. DHEA, or dehydroepiandrosterone, is a natural hormone that the body uses to make the male hormone testosterone. DHEA and testosterone decrease with age, just as ED increases with age, so it seems that taking DHEA might protect against ED. But Harris says that "it is unlikely that taking DHEA would raise your testosterone enough to make much difference." DHEA should not be used by people with liver problems; it also has many side effects.
If you can't take one of these oral medications, your physician may have you try Caverject (alprostadil for injection), a hormone that you inject into your penis using a fine needle, or Muse (alprostadil urogenital), a tiny suppository that you insert into the tip of the penis. Both of these will bring on an erection within five to 15 minutes without sexual stimulation.
Niacin, prescribed for more than 50 years, has been successful in treating all three types of lipids in your bloodstream. It can reduce levels of low-density lipoprotein -- LDL, or “bad,” cholesterol -- and triglycerides, as well as elevate your levels of protective high-density lipoprotein -- HDL, or “good,” cholesterol. But other medications, as well as diet and lifestyle changes, can restore your cholesterol to heart-healthy levels. If you currently take niacin and want to start taking medication to treat erectile dysfunction, ask your doctor about switching to a different type of cholesterol medication.
The human body only contains 2 or 3 grams of zinc at any given time. Zinc is distributed throughout the body in organs, blood, and bones. It can be difficult to diagnose zinc deficiency. While a low blood zinc level does indicate a deficiency, a normal blood level does not necessarily indicate the absence of a deficiency. And examination of the hair for zinc or a zinc taste test (ZTT) may also be used for supportive evidence in the diagnosis of zinc deficiency.
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