Yohimbine: The main component of an African tree bark, yohimbine is probably one of the most problematic of all natural remedies for ED. Some research suggests that yohimbine can improve a type of sexual dysfunction that is linked with a drug used to treat depression. However, studies have linked yohimbine to a number of side effects, which can include anxiety, increased blood pressure, and a fast, irregular heartbeat. Like all natural remedies, yohimbine should only be used after advice and under supervision from a doctor.

A study from the University of the West in the United Kingdom found that pelvic exercises helped 40 percent of men with ED regain normal erectile function. They also helped an additional 33.5 percent significantly improve erectile function. Additional research suggests pelvic muscle training may be helpful for treating ED as well as other pelvic health issues.
Niacin -- with or without the addition of drugs to treat impotence -- poses serious health risks, including stomach ulcers and liver damage. If you have Type 2 diabetes, taking niacin could cause drastic elevations in your blood sugar levels. Less serious side effects include stomach upset and skin flushes -- your face and chest turn red and your skin itches, tingles or burns. You can purchase niacin without a prescription, but some over-the-counter formulas -- no-flush varieties that contain niacinamide -- will unlikely help lower your cholesterol.
Esposito et al (18), in their randomized study investigated the effect of physical activities on 110 obese subjects. They reported significant effect of physical activities on both body mass index and EF. The physiological rationales underlying this hypothesis are that healthy lifestyle factors are associated with maintenance of good erectile function in men (19); obesity has been positively associated with endothelial dysfunction and increased serum concentrations of vascular inflammatory markers (34, 35); and both endothelial and erectile dysfunction may share some common metabolic and vascular pathways that may be influenced by behavioral-related pathways (19, 36). Obese men with erectile dysfunction had evidence of abnormal endothelial function, which was indicated by reduced blood pressure and platelet aggregation responses to L-arginine and elevated serum concentrations of markers of low-grade inflammation, such as IL-6, IL-8, and CRP. It has been shown that there are significant associations between IEEF score and proxy indicators of elevated body fat, the vascular response to L-arginine, and circulating IL-8 and CRP levels. The association we found between IEEF score and indices of endothelial dysfunction supports the presence of common vascular pathways underlying both conditions in obese men. A disturbance in nitric oxide activity linked to reduced nitric oxide availability could provide a unifying explanation for this association. In particular, in isolated corpus cavernosum strips from patients with erectile dysfunction both neurogenic and endothelium-dependent relaxation is impaired (37).
From the overall analysis, the niacin group showed a significant increase in both IIEF-Q3 scores (0.53 ± 1.18, P < 0.001) and IIEF-Q4 scores (0.35 ± 1.17, P = 0.013) compared with baseline values. The placebo group also showed a significant increase in IIEF-Q3 scores (0.30 ± 1.16, P = 0.040) but not IIEF-Q4 scores (0.24 ± 1.13, P = 0.084). However, when patients were stratified according to the baseline severity of ED, the patients with moderate and severe ED who received niacin showed a significant improvement in IIEF-Q3 scores (0.56 ± 0.96 [P = 0.037] and 1.03 ± 1.20 [P < 0.001], respectively) and IIEF-Q4 scores (0.56 ± 1.03 [P = 0.048] and 0.84 ± 1.05 [P < 0.001], respectively] compared with baseline values, but not for the placebo group. The improvement in IIEF-EF domain score for severe and moderate ED patients in the niacin group were 5.28 ± 5.94 (P < 0.001) and 3.31 ± 4.54 (P = 0.014) and in the placebo group were 2.65 ± 5.63 (P < 0.041) and 2.74 ± 5.59 (P = 0.027), respectively. There was no significant improvement in erectile function for patients with mild and mild-to-moderate ED for both groups. For patients not receiving statins treatment, there was a significant improvement in IIEF-Q3 scores (0.47 ± 1.16 [P = 0.004]) for the niacin group, but not for the placebo group.
People who do not have any contra-indications (see below) generally tolerate it well. However, taking yohimbe can sometimes cause side effects including: high blood pressure, headaches, anxiety, restlessness/nervousness, dizziness or shakiness. These side effects seem to affect people with a history of mental illness or mood-related problems most often. But it’s possible for them to develop in anybody.
Zinc affects different aspects of mammalian reproduction. Testicular disruption, impaired spermatogenesis and subsequent poor semen parameters are found in males with zinc deficiency. Testicular concentration of zinc was lower in male sheep fed with zinc deficient diets. The same animals showed smaller seminiferous tubules and less lumen development than the controls.[1] Similarly variable degrees of maturation arrest in different stages of spermatogenesis with reduced diameter of seminiferous tubules were noted when rats were fed with zinc deficient diets.[2] Zinc deficiency causes a reduction in the structural parameters of seminiferous tubules influences serum levels of testosterone (T) and prolactin (PRL) in rats.[3,4]
Moreover, it has a positive effect on the nervous system, liver, skin, and mucous membranes, as well as keeps skin, nails, and hair healthy. And of course, what is important for men, erectile dysfunction treatment with vitamin B2 relieves symptoms of the most hateful male disease. Moreover, this vitamin is well-known as a supplier of sexual energy and vitality.
David Gomes completed his M.S Professional degree in California Institute of Technology. He lives in Oakland, California, USA. He loves to write on a variety of topics such as joint health, weight loss, beauty and skin care for blogs and on-line publication sites. He also loves latest technology, gadgets. You can connect with him on Google+ and Twitter.
Just because a product claims to be natural doesn't mean it's safe. Many herbal remedies and dietary supplements can cause side effects and dangerous interactions when taken with certain medications. Talk to your doctor before you try an alternative treatment for erectile dysfunction — especially if you're taking medications or you have a chronic health problem such as heart disease or diabetes.
"The good news is, our study also found that a large proportion of men were naturally overcoming erectile dysfunction issues. The remission rate of those with erectile dysfunction was 29%, which is very high. This shows that many of these factors affecting men are modifiable, offering them an opportunity to do something about their condition," Professor Wittert says.
Andrew McCullough, MD, associate professor of clinical urology and director, male sexual health program, New York University Langone Medical Center. Lecturer: Auxillium. Research grant: Pfizer. Data safety monitoring board: Pfizer. Consultant: Slate Pharmaceuticals. Clinical trials: Warner Chilcott, Vivus, Lilly, Bayer-GSK, ICOS, Timm, Schering Plough, Aeterna.
Aerobic exercises and pelvic floor exercises are two of the best methods to start with. As a matter of fact, you can see improvements on your condition without having to witness the side effects of other male enhancement products. For one, there are certain male enhancement products which should not be taken if you are suffering from other types of medical condition. For instance, if the product contains substances that may react to the male enhancement ingredients of a product, you may suffer from certain consequences.
For Men: Soy is terrible for the male sex drive as the phytoestrogens build up to unnatural levels much too quickly. In fact, an ex boyfriend and I experimented with this when he decided to become vegan. He ate and drank soy products for a month and by the end of that time he had zero libido. Within two weeks of stopping all soy, he was back to normal.

It’s traditionally used by Pygmies and Bushmen as an aphrodisiac and stimulant. In the 19th century, German missionaries brought this herbal plant to Europe, where it became known as the “love tree.” The extract of this herb is clear and odorless with a bitter taste, and is traditionally prepared and consumed as a tea. Nowadays, medicines and supplements that contain yohimbe bark are available in capsule and tablet form.


This African tree bark extract sends blood flow to the genitals, said herbalist Ed Smith, a founding member of the American Herbalists Guild, who adds a warning that Yohimbe can cause nervousness and raise already-existing high blood pressure (so avoid taking it if you have heart or kidney disease), and can also negatively interact with antidepressants.
In the New World, maize was traditionally treated with lime, an alkali now shown to make niacin nutritionally available and thereby reducing the chance of developing pellagra.1 However, when in the 18th century corn cultivation was adopted worldwide, treatment with lime was not accepted because the benefit was not understood. Thus in the New World, often heavily dependent on corn, cultivators rarely suffered from pellagra, which became common only when corn became a staple that was eaten without the traditional treatment. Of interest, if maize is not so processed, it is a poor source of tryptophan as well as niacin.

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What it’ll do for you: “Yohimbe dilates the blood vessels and can lower blood pressure,” says Dr. Patrick M. Fratellone, an integrated physician with a practice in Manhattan. “So experts figured, if it can do that, it must give you an erection and treat erectile dysfunction.” Some proponents say that yohimbe extracts are powerful antioxidants that can prevent heart attacks, act as a stimulant and an anti-depressant, and an aid to weight loss. Here, a closer look at the key benefits:
The phrase “use it before you lose it” can be applied when it comes to helping men with ED regain normal erectile function. Pelvic exercises, more commonly known as kegel exercises, are used to promote urinary continence and sexual health. They help to strengthen the bulbocavernosus muscle, which does three things: allows the penis to engorge with blood during erection, it pumps during ejaculation, and it helps empty the urethra after urination, according to Healthline.

These medications don’t work for everyone but they are easy to use and work for around 60% of people who try them. They work by making it easier to get an erection by reducing the effect of (inhibiting) the chemical PDE-5. This chemical is used in the body to make sure there isn’t too much blood in the penis during an erection, but if you have erectile dysfunction then this chemical ends up over-compensating.
Not only will regular exercise burn calories and lower stress, it may lower your risk of ED. Before you start working out, check with your doctor about the best program for you. Think of exercises you're likely to enjoy and will want to continue on a daily basis, whether it's 30 minutes in the morning on a stationary bike while watching the news, a kick-boxing class, or a brisk after-dinner walk around the neighborhood with a friend.
Most human studies completed thus-far examine the impact of oral yohimbine consumption on erectile dysfunction (ED) in males. A meta-analysis of seven randomized, placebo-controlled trials found that yohimbine is significantly more effective in treating ED compared to placebo. [11] These findings did not compare yohimbine to prescription medications like Viagra®, which are designed to treat ED.

Taking high doses can also cause other severe problems, including difficulty breathing, paralysis, very low blood pressure, heart problems, and death. After taking a one-day dose of yohimbine, one person reported an allergic reaction involving fever; chills; listlessness; itchy, scaly skin; progressive kidney failure; and symptoms that looked like the auto-immune disease called lupus.
In addition, statins had a relatively fast effect on the problem of erectile dysfunction as compared to its role in the reduction of cholesterol, which suggest that Niacin drugs were reaching to deal with root inflammation of the mentioned problems significantly. According to the researcher Howard Hermann, Men consuming Niacin scored better on both self-reported tests associated with the function of erectile and the levels of lipids in blood.
To evaluate the patients' response clinically in the office, a simple grading system was used.27 The patients were asked about the quality of their erections, which were graded as follows: grade 1, tumescence but no rigidity; grade 2, tumescence with minimal rigidity; grade 3, rigidity sufficient for sexual intercourse; and grade 4, fully rigid erection. At the end of the study, patients were graded as to whether they thought they had improved enough to have satisfactory regular intercourse, which is defined as success in 75% of attempts. The degree of subjective improvement in intercourse was used to classify patients as ‘responders’ vs ‘nonresponders’ in subsequent analyses. A log was kept by the couple of their sexual activity, and it was taken to the clinic for review by the clinical investigator.
These results are remarkable, because it appears that not only can niacin improve short term erectile function in many men, but also can likely help to reverse arterial plaque if a comprehensive program is undertaken.  Of course, neither I nor anyone else knows how safe megadosed niacin is long term, but many experts consider it safe when used under the care of a knowledgeable physician.  You'll have to do your own due diligence.

Aids in fat loss: Yohimbe and other alkaloids in the bark extract are said to block specific receptors that actually inhibit fat loss. A three-week study in 1991 observed 20 obese females on 1,000-calorie diets. They were given 20 mg of yohimbe each day and lost three pounds more than the group receiving placebos. Not a drastic weight loss, but enough to give experts hope that yohimbe can help with weight loss. Other studies have found that yohimbe increases the amount of non-esterified fatty acids, a result of fat breaking down. More research is needed. Most other studies in the field are done using the drug yohimbine. Extracted chemicals are not the same as yohimbe bark. Studies with yohimbine are expected to give different results than studies that used the raw plant.


The paired t-test was used to assess differences in responses using various doses of yohimbine in responders and nonresponders. Responder and nonresponder changes in tumescence, rigidity, and other physiologic responses over the entire study period were compared using independent t-tests (assuming equal variances). Independent t-tests were repeated to determine whether significant differences existed in the mean numbers of risk factors, age, or side effects among groups. Matched pairs t-tests were used to compare Florida Sexual History Questionnaire responses at each dose. Finally, χ2 analysis (or Fisher's exact test when appropriate) was used to compare the two groups on dichotomous sexual satisfaction ratings at the end of the trial; 95% confidence intervals were consistently examined to determine the magnitudes of differences detected. Two-tailed P-levels were used in reporting all results. SPSS 9.0 statistical software (SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL, USA) was used for analysis.
Two years ago I took regular Niacine for about a year to lower LDL and increase HDL. I did not want to take Statins because of its side effects. I was being monitored by my Dr. because of the effect on liver enzymes. I took 1.5 gr together with Phytosterols. The treatment was effective and the only side effect were the flushes which I found could be eliminated by having 500 mg at the end of each of the 3 main meals. I stopped treatment for a year or so, but now the Dr. suggested I start taking Niacine. or Statins. I chose Niacine (Nicotine Acid) and started with 500 mgs for 3 days; increased it to 1000 mgs. for 4 more days, until I increased it to 500 mgs x 3 for a total of 1.5 grms/day taking 500 mgms/meal. I started noticing my gradual decrease in libido this time almost inmediately. I do not take any other medicines as such I'm definitely inclined to blame Niacine because I have taken Phytosterols for 3 years and my libido was fine. I'm a senior. Hope this will help!
This content is provided as a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of the National Institutes of Health. The NIDDK translates and disseminates research findings through its clearinghouses and education programs to increase knowledge and understanding about health and disease among patients, health professionals, and the public. Content produced by the NIDDK is carefully reviewed by NIDDK scientists and other experts.
There are many different reasons a man’s ability to sustain or maintain an erection may be impaired. Impotence is the most common sexual disorder among men. It is thought that most men should be able to achieve and maintain an erection well into their 80s, but about 25 percent of all men over the age of 50 are thought to experience some form of impotence. By the age of 75, half of all men will be impotent. Impotence may come and go, depending on the state of their physical health as well as their stress levels. One of the number one causes of impotence is cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease may restrict blood flow to the penile tissues, which greatly affects a man’s ability to achieve and maintain an erection during sexual arousal.

You may find that using a vacuum device requires some practice or adjustment. Using the device may make your penis feel cold or numb and have a purple color. You also may have bruising on your penis. However, the bruises are most often painless and disappear in a few days. Vacuum devices may weaken ejaculation but, in most cases, the devices do not affect the pleasure of climax, or orgasm.
In the 18th century, Spain embraced the Age of Enlightenment, directing the beacons of thought to all endeavors. But while Spain was not as advanced as France, Britain, Germany, or America, its new political thinking led to the revocation of most of the historical rights and privileges of the sub-kingdoms that comprised the Spanish Crown. Those changes, in turn, allowed for the freedom of inquiry that was so needed for medical discovery, among others.
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, ingesting levels of zinc in excess of the recommended dietary amount will result in diarrhea, vomiting, and stomach cramps. The maximum amount of daily zinc consumption recommended is 40 milligrams per day. Symptoms of too much zinc intake include nausea and headaches. If you have reason to suspect you have ingested too much zinc, contact a medical professional.
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