Participants in this study gradually increased their daily intake of niacin from 250 mg to 3,000 mg over 36 weeks. Nine of the 23 people who were taking immediate-release niacin withdrew from the study early because of facial flushing, fatigue, or skin discoloration. Eighteen of the 23 who were taking 3,000 mg daily of sustained-release niacin dropped out due to upset stomachs, fatigue, or abnormal liver function tests. All of these side effects disappeared once the participants stopped taking the vitamin. Additional cause for concern comes from other reports suggesting that high doses of sustained-release niacin can cause jaundice and liver failure.

Obesity is a state of chronic oxidative stress and inflammation (38). The increased oxidative stress associated with obesity may increase free radical formation, which could quench and deactivate nitric oxide, reducing its availability for target cells. Weight loss programs with dietary modifications and increased physical activity may lead to reduced oxidative stress associated with improved nitric oxide availability (39). As impaired nitric oxide activity appears to play an important role in the pathogenesis of erectile dysfunction (40), improved nitric oxide availability associated with weight loss may be implicated in the amelioration of erectile function in our series of obese men. A reduced CRP level due to sustained lifestyle changes may have contributed to amelioration of erectile function after treatment. Levels of CRP correlate significantly with reduced nitric oxide availability (41) and increasing severity of penile vascular disease as measured by penile Doppler (42). Moreover, consistent findings support a predictive role of CRP and IL-6 for cardiovascular events in different populations (43), while IL-8 is a potent chemoattractant (44).
Nitric oxide is made internally from L-arginine, which is an amino acid found in red meat, poultry, fish, and dairy products. In other words, L-arginine is the building block for nitric oxide, which is essential for erections. A lack of one can lead to a lack of the other. However, there’s a problem when it comes to treating L-arginine deficiency with supplements.
Dealing with erection problems can be a challenge. However, there are lots of treatments and lifestyle changes which can help. While medications such as Viagra improve symptoms in the short term, pelvic floor exercises can help you improve your sexual function in the long term. Find out why pelvic floor, also known as Kegel exercises, can be used to treat ED and how to perform the exercises correctly.
Could the bark of a tree actually increase libido and improve impotence? Well yes it can… Yohimbe bark (Pausinystalia yohimbe), one of the most popular herbal remedies for male sexual dysfunction, has been shown in studies to increase blood flow to the genitals of both men and women, proving to be helpful for those with low libido. Though Yohimbe can be used by women, its actions have been shown to be extremely supportive for men experiencing erectile dysfunction due to stress or as a side effect of physiological health issues.
Men can judge themselves pretty harshly when it comes to their performance in between the sheets. The unsettling fear of not being able to rise to the occasion becomes a reccurring nightmare for men that is often equated with failure, loss of dignity, and masculinity. If you suffer from erectile dysfunction (ED), don’t be so hard on yourself, since impotence can almost always be improved with treatment, without having to rely on Viagra or other medications. Whether you suffer from ED, or hope to prevent the condition, here are six tips to overcome impotence without the side effects of the little blue pill.

A conflicting study of 22 subjects found that a 100mg daily dose of yohimbine for 30 days did not significantly improve penile rigidity. Three subjects experienced a notable increase in penile rigidity and twelve subject experience a partial increase in rigidity. [13] These findings do not completely discount the use of yohimbine to treat erectile dysfunction, but do suggest the compound's effects, even at very high dosages, will cause varying responses across a similar population.
Returning to pellagra, Dr. Casal was the first to offer a clinical description of the disease. He called it mal de la rose due to the red rash seen on the hands and feet of sufferers. In fact, his account is now recognized as the first modern pathological description of a syndrome. This was the beginning of a progression of discoveries that led to the isolation of niacin in 1911, and its direct implication as the dietary deficiency factor in pellagra in 1937.
Size matters, so get slim and stay slim. A trim waistline is one good defense — a man with a 42-inch waist is 50% more likely to have ED than one with a 32-inch waist. Losing weight can help fight erectile dysfunction, so getting to a healthy weight and staying there is another good strategy for avoiding or fixing ED. Obesity raises risks for vascular disease and diabetes, two major causes of ED. And excess fat interferes with several hormones that may be part of the problem as well.
Three types of medications to treat erectile dysfunction -- sildenafil, vardenafil and tadalafil -- may cause low blood pressure. Niacin, used to treat conditions such as high cholesterol and hardening of the arteries, can also lower your blood pressure. If you take medications to treat male impotence, ask your doctor before combining it with niacin.
Men, aged 40–80 y, were recruited from new consultations seen for erectile dysfunction at the Lahey Clinic Center for Sexual Function. Patients were screened by history and physical examination and by evaluation of nocturnal penile tumescence and rigidity with the RigiScan™ (Timm Medical Technologies, Inc., Minneapolis, USA). Candidates completed a sexual questionnaire and had morning blood tests for luteinizing hormone (LH), free testosterone, cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and androstenedione. Inclusion criteria included normal initial serum testosterone and prolactin levels and the presence of an organic cause of erectile dysfunction manifested by abnormal nocturnal tumescence and rigidity testing with the RigiScan™ monitor. Active smokers and men with concurrent major psychiatric problems were excluded. No other treatment for erectile dysfunction was permitted during the study. Yohimbine hydrochloride (supplied by Palisades Pharmaceuticals, Palisades, NJ, USA) was started at a dose of 5.4 mg three times a day (tid) for 4 weeks, after which the sex questionnaire was administered again and blood tests, nocturnal penile tumescence and rigidity testing were repeated. The dose of yohimbine then was increased to 10.8 mg tid for 4 additional weeks followed by a third administration of the sex questionnaire and final measurements of hormone levels and nocturnal penile tumescence and rigidity monitoring.
Three subsets (eight in each subset) of sexually experienced adult male rats were supplemented with three different oral doses of zinc sulphate (a daily dose of 1 mg, 5 mg and 10 mg respectively) for two weeks. A subset of eight animals without zinc supplementation was used as the control group Sexual behavior was observed by placing them individually in cages with receptive females.
1. Increased Blood Flow in Men with Lower Niacin Levels.  Of course, there is a lot to an erection, but I think just about everyone would agree that the #1 goal is to increase something called endothelial function.  The endothelium is the delicate lining of the arteries that pumps out nitric oxide and relaxes the arteries.  And, of course, a relaxed, i.e. more open artery is one that allows more blood to flow into your arm, your leg or your brain.  And I'm sure I don't need to explain why increased blood flow into your penile arteries is critical for erectile strength.
Taking high doses can also cause other severe problems, including difficulty breathing, paralysis, very low blood pressure, heart problems, and death. After taking a one-day dose of yohimbine, one person reported an allergic reaction involving fever; chills; listlessness; itchy, scaly skin; progressive kidney failure; and symptoms that looked like the auto-immune disease called lupus.
A study in the Journal of Sexual Medicine found that a large percentage of men with ED also have low levels of vitamin D. If you’re experiencing ED, you may want to have your level of vitamin D checked. Other symptoms of a low vitamin D level may be too subtle to notice. However, if you have serious vitamin D deficiency, you may have bone pain or muscle weakness. Vitamin D levels can be checked with a simple blood test and for most people corrected with a supplement.
Dr. Traxler is a University-trained obstetrician/gynecologist, working with patients in Minnesota for over 20 years. She is a professional medical writer; having authored multiple books on pregnancy and childbirth; textbooks and coursework for medical students and other healthcare providers; and has written over 1000 articles on medical, health, and wellness topics.  Dr. Traxler attended the University of Minnesota College of Biological Sciences and University of Minnesota Medical School,  earning a degree in biochemistry with summa cum laude honors in 1981,  and receiving her Medical Doctorate degree (MD) in 1986.
Yohimbine: The main component of an African tree bark, yohimbine is probably one of the most problematic of all natural remedies for ED. Some research suggests that yohimbine can improve a type of sexual dysfunction that is linked with a drug used to treat depression. However, studies have linked yohimbine to a number of side effects, which can include anxiety, increased blood pressure, and a fast, irregular heartbeat. Like all natural remedies, yohimbine should only be used after advice and under supervision from a doctor.
From the overall analysis, the niacin group showed a significant increase in both IIEF-Q3 scores (0.53 ± 1.18, P < 0.001) and IIEF-Q4 scores (0.35 ± 1.17, P = 0.013) compared with baseline values. The placebo group also showed a significant increase in IIEF-Q3 scores (0.30 ± 1.16, P = 0.040) but not IIEF-Q4 scores (0.24 ± 1.13, P = 0.084). However, when patients were stratified according to the baseline severity of ED, the patients with moderate and severe ED who received niacin showed a significant improvement in IIEF-Q3 scores (0.56 ± 0.96 [P = 0.037] and 1.03 ± 1.20 [P < 0.001], respectively) and IIEF-Q4 scores (0.56 ± 1.03 [P = 0.048] and 0.84 ± 1.05 [P < 0.001], respectively] compared with baseline values, but not for the placebo group. The improvement in IIEF-EF domain score for severe and moderate ED patients in the niacin group were 5.28 ± 5.94 (P < 0.001) and 3.31 ± 4.54 (P = 0.014) and in the placebo group were 2.65 ± 5.63 (P < 0.041) and 2.74 ± 5.59 (P = 0.027), respectively. There was no significant improvement in erectile function for patients with mild and mild-to-moderate ED for both groups. For patients not receiving statins treatment, there was a significant improvement in IIEF-Q3 scores (0.47 ± 1.16 [P = 0.004]) for the niacin group, but not for the placebo group.
Yohimbe can interact with several drugs and medications, so it’s not safe for everybody to use. Don’t take yohimbe bark if you’re currently taking any ACE inhibitor drug, beta blocker, SSRI drug, MAOI, stimulants or caffeine-containing drugs, or tricyclic antidepressant drugs. Those who have any of the conditions listed below should not take herbal treatments like yohimbe without speaking with a doctor first. This is because it may affect things like blood pressure, heart health, kidney function and neurotransmitter functions:
Adequate daily magnesium intake is slightly lower for younger men than for those in their 30s and older. The University of Maryland Medical Center recommends 400 mg daily for men between the ages of 19 and 30, and 420 mg per day for men 31 and older. While these levels are a good general guideline, you should check with your doctor to determine the proper dosage for a daily magnesium supplement, particularly if you’re using magnesium to help treat or prevent erectile problems.
There’s evidence to show that Yohimbine may have some small effect in helping aid weight loss. In 1991, there was a study of 20 overweight women on diet of 1,000 calories per day. Each was given 20 mg of Yohimbine a day, and lost 3 pounds more than those who weren’t taking any. Any weight loss drug should, however, always be taken alongside a healthy diet and exercise.
One of the main actions of yohimbe bark is alpha-2 antagonism (this is why it’s also sometimes called an “alpha-2 blocker”). This means that it can impact sympathetic nervous system activity and increase the release of adrenaline (or noradrenaline). This is because it blocks alpha-2 receptors in the brain stem. (4) Other types of alpha-2 agonists medications work in a similar way. They affect the central nervous system by altering release of certain neurotransmitters and dilating blood vessels. This increases alertness, circulation and other physiological processes.

The principal difference between the Hong Kong study. and others that proceeded it, is that the researchers used niacin alone, rather than in combination with PDE5 inhibitors. The results indicate that niacin can improve erectile function in those with moderate to severe ED but not in those with mild and mild-to-moderate ED. Statins also appear to be effective for improving erectile function in those with more severe ED.
Could the bark of a tree actually increase libido and improve impotence? Well yes it can… Yohimbe bark (Pausinystalia yohimbe), one of the most popular herbal remedies for male sexual dysfunction, has been shown in studies to increase blood flow to the genitals of both men and women, proving to be helpful for those with low libido. Though Yohimbe can be used by women, its actions have been shown to be extremely supportive for men experiencing erectile dysfunction due to stress or as a side effect of physiological health issues.
Information on this website is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for the advice provided by your physician or other healthcare professional. You should not use the information on this website for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease, or prescribing any medication or other treatment. Any third party offering or advertising on this website does not constitute an endorsement by Andrew Weil, M.D. or Healthy Lifestyle Brands.
There’s no bedroom bummer quite like having to fly at half mast, but your penis problems are likely more common than you think: As many as 30 million American men suffer from erectile dysfunction, and one in four who seek treatment for ED are actually under the age of 40, according to a study in The Journal of Sexual Medicine. We all know there’s a little blue pill that can fix the failure to launch—but you don’t necessarily have to fill a ‘script to save your stiffy.

However, you might actually be better off going one step back in the chain reaction and taking an L-citrulline supplement. While your body converts L-arginine to nitric oxide, it also metabolizes it too fast when the amino acid is taken in an oral supplement, according to a 2011 study from the University of Foggia in Italy. L-citrulline, which the body converts to L-arginine, is actually a better option to follow the same metabolic pathway and serve as a treatment for ED, the same study found.
Does drinking water improve erectile dysfunction? Erectile dysfunction or ED is a common concern for men. Everyday factors, such as hydration levels, may affect a person's ability to get or maintain an erection. Drinking water may, therefore, help some men with ED. In this article, learn about the link between hydration and ED, and other factors that can cause ED. Read now
Although not proven, it is likely that erectile dysfunction can be prevented by good general health, paying particular attention to body weight, exercise, and cigarette smoking. For example, heart disease and diabetes are problems that can cause erectile dysfunction, and both are preventable through lifestyle changes such as sensible eating and regular exercise. Furthermore, early diagnosis and treatment of associated conditions like diabetes, hypertension and high cholesterol may prevent or delay erectile dysfunction, or stop the erectile dysfunction from getting more serious.
When a man becomes sexually excited, muscles in their penis relax. This relaxation allows for increased blood flow through the penile arteries. This blood fills two chambers inside the penis called the corpora cavernosa. As the chambers fill with blood, the penis grows rigid. Erection ends when the muscles contract and the accumulated blood can flow out through the penile veins.
Supplements are popular and often cheaper than prescription drugs for ED. However, supplements have not been tested to see how well they work or if they are a safe treatment for ED. Patients should know that many over-the-counter drugs have been found on drug testing to have ‘bootlegged' PDE 5 Inhibitors as their main ingredient. The amounts of Viagra, Cialis, Levitra or Stendra that may be in these supplements is not under quality control and may differ from pill to pill. The FDA has issued consumer warnings and alerts.

Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Yohimbe might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. Taking yohimbe along with some medications that are broken down by the liver can increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before taking yohimbe talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.
A cold slice of watermelon can do more than just satisfy thirst and hunger during the warm summer months; it can help with bedroom satisfaction. Citrulline, the amino acid found in high concentrations of watermelon, is found to improve blood flow to the penis. A 2011 study revealed men who suffered from mild to moderate ED and took L-citrulline supplementation showed an improvement with their erectile function and were very satisfied. Natural watermelon juice, or “nature’s Viagra,” can also be easier on the stomach, since taking pills like Viagra can cause nausea and diarrhea.
People who do not have any contra-indications (see below) generally tolerate it well. However, taking yohimbe can sometimes cause side effects including: high blood pressure, headaches, anxiety, restlessness/nervousness, dizziness or shakiness. These side effects seem to affect people with a history of mental illness or mood-related problems most often. But it’s possible for them to develop in anybody.
While eating magnesium-rich foods or taking a magnesium supplement at the proper dosage is safe for most men, the mineral can interfere or interact with some medications. Discuss the benefits and risks of altering your daily magnesium intake with your doctor, particularly if you take blood pressure medications, diuretics, diabetes medications or antibiotics. Men diagnosed with erectile dysfunction often require changes in other minerals and vitamins or even prescription medication. Ensuring a proper daily intake of magnesium may help maintain healthy erectile function, but magnesium alone is unlikely to cause a significant reduction in ED symptoms. Magnesium levels can also be affected by excess weight, chronic stress and excessive amounts of alcohol. These factors may also be partially responsible for erectile problems.
Dealing with erection problems can be a challenge. However, there are lots of treatments and lifestyle changes which can help. While medications such as Viagra improve symptoms in the short term, pelvic floor exercises can help you improve your sexual function in the long term. Find out why pelvic floor, also known as Kegel exercises, can be used to treat ED and how to perform the exercises correctly.

Taking zinc in supplement form is just one of many treatments for those looking for help with ED. Many men use supplements either to replace prescription medications like Viagra and Cialis, or to enhance the effectiveness of these medications. Some other natural supplements aimed at relieving ED symptoms include Korean red ginseng, L-Arginine, carnitine, and DHEA.
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