There are two things that need to be looked at in recommending a supplement for a medical condition: what is the physiology of the medical condition and what is the pharmacology of the supplement you are using.  There then is a search for a link between the two that leads to a tie in with a therapeutic approach.  In some ways this is like a logic course that says A causes B, B causes C therefor A causes C.  We then must apply this to the scientific method and finally the ultimate test: clinical response and safety.  This is often made out to be the gold standard for our typical Rx meds that I dispense every day, but often ridiculed when it crosses the barbed wired “nutraceutical” boarder.  If it is a nutrient then we must be getting the right amount in our food after all right?  Regardless of 1)what the real amount is in the food we eat, not to mention 2)the depletion that may be taking place of that nutrient due to a prescription drug we are taking (an absolute science based cause and effect) – we blindly accept what our food has in it and the level our bodies maintain – this is an incorrect assumption.  In fact it is quite ironic that the anti-nutraceutical court is still hanging onto this assumption when both are established by science.
Selenium, found in Brazil nuts, liver and oysters, is a trace mineral that plays an important role in hormone health. You only need a tiny bit for healthy sperm, but a tiny deficiency can be catastrophic for reproductive health. In one study, men who had lower testosterone and were infertile also had significantly lower selenium levels than the fertile group. Supplementing with the mineral improved chances of successful conception by 56 percent. And a second British Journal of Urology study that included 69 infertile men with low levels of the mineral, found selenium supplementation could significantly improve sub-par sperm motility associated with testosterone deficiency. Check out these 7 Testosterone-Boosting Foods!
Yohimbe bark (pronounced yoh-heem-buh) is an herbal supplement associated with anti-aging effects. It is used to naturally treat erectile dysfunction, low libido, hormonal imbalances and symptoms like low energy. Yohimbe has a long history of use in Western Africa, where the plant originates. It’s still grown there today, especially for its apparent aphrodisiac abilities.
A complete sexual behavioral cycle of males involved pre sexual performances, copulation and ultimate ejaculation. Pre sexual behavior comprises physical contact with the female, sniffing and licking of female genital area, licking of their own penis, and few mounts without intromissions. Although all induced females were screened for receptivity, some females showed a mild rejection in the beginning. However, there were no rejections when they were coupled with very active males. All animals which completed the behavioral cycle showed a normal pattern of behavior (not an aberrant sexual behaviour) during the observation period.
From the overall analysis, the niacin group showed a significant increase in both IIEF-Q3 scores (0.53 ± 1.18, P < 0.001) and IIEF-Q4 scores (0.35 ± 1.17, P = 0.013) compared with baseline values. The placebo group also showed a significant increase in IIEF-Q3 scores (0.30 ± 1.16, P = 0.040) but not IIEF-Q4 scores (0.24 ± 1.13, P = 0.084). However, when patients were stratified according to the baseline severity of ED, the patients with moderate and severe ED who received niacin showed a significant improvement in IIEF-Q3 scores (0.56 ± 0.96 [P = 0.037] and 1.03 ± 1.20 [P < 0.001], respectively) and IIEF-Q4 scores (0.56 ± 1.03 [P = 0.048] and 0.84 ± 1.05 [P < 0.001], respectively] compared with baseline values, but not for the placebo group. The improvement in IIEF-EF domain score for severe and moderate ED patients in the niacin group were 5.28 ± 5.94 (P < 0.001) and 3.31 ± 4.54 (P = 0.014) and in the placebo group were 2.65 ± 5.63 (P < 0.041) and 2.74 ± 5.59 (P = 0.027), respectively. There was no significant improvement in erectile function for patients with mild and mild-to-moderate ED for both groups. For patients not receiving statins treatment, there was a significant improvement in IIEF-Q3 scores (0.47 ± 1.16 [P = 0.004]) for the niacin group, but not for the placebo group.

Erectile dysfunction obviously can be frustrating, but it can also be an important warning sign of potential heart disease risk. Once you rule that out, there are natural things you can do to improve it. For more information on how to take control of ED, contact Tack180 for a free consultation. Our experts in nutrition, stress management, behavioral psychology, and fitness go beyond the usual counsel to address your particular vulnerabilities.


Energy-boosting goji berries have been used for thousands of years in Chinese medicine to help increase energy and enhance the release of hormones.”Goji is also beneficial for increasing blood flow, which helps to oxygenate all of the cells and tissues of the body, including the sex organs,” says celebrity nutritionist Dr. Lindsey Duncan. “Which increases libido—that’s why they call goji the ‘Viagra of China.'”
In the Hong Kong study, the researchers postulated that niacin might be as beneficial as statins on erectile function, and have other related benefits too. Niacin is known to produce a flushing effect (see “Toleration Despite Adversity,” above), which is related to prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) release in the skin. This can lead to vasodilation and concomitant flushing. The production of PGD2 can also occur in macrophages, a type of protective white blood cell. Consequently, when PGD2 production is induced by niacin, it may affect all body tissue, including the cavernosal tissue in the penis. Indeed, PGD2 is one of the potential agents causing the vasodilation and engorgement of cavernosal tissue, thereby leading to erection. Thus, niacin improves erectile function by stimulating the production of PGD2.

But, first for those of you who do not know anything on this topic, let’s define erectile dysfunction. Erectile dysfunction is a condition which characterizes itself with the inability to maintain an erection during sexual intercourse. Luckily, although erectile dysfunction is a common condition, this condition seems to be easily treated. You can choose from the variety of natural remedies, including supplements, which claim to increase your stamina, sexual ability, and muscle mass. This article is dedicated to the importance of exercise as a way to treat erectile dysfunction and highlight the best exercises you could use as a part of the treatment. 


With an inflatable implant, fluid-filled cylinders are placed lengthwise in the penis. Tubing joins these cylinders to a pump placed inside the scrotum (between the testicles). When the pump is engaged, pressure in the cylinders inflate the penis and makes it stiff. Inflatable implants make a normal looking erection and are natural feeling for your partner. Your surgeon may suggest a lubricant for your partner. With the implant, men can control firmness and, sometimes, the size of the erection. Implants allows a couple to be spontaneously intimate. There is generally no change to a man's feeling or orgasm.

Yohimbine hydrochloride is the principal alkaloid of the bark of the African yohimbe tree. It is primarily selective for the presynaptic alpha-2 receptor that enhances the central release of norepinephrine1,2 or even epinephrine,3 although the latter is controversial.4 This central action increases sexual arousal2,5 and appears similar to the central alpha-2 adrenergic mechanism that initiates hot flashes.6 Peripherally, yohimbine may partially antagonize norepinephrine-induced contraction of corporeal cavernosal smooth muscle.7,8 The action is that of an antagonist to postjunctional alpha-2 adrenergic receptors, but a direct effect on vascular smooth muscle is also possible.9
Three subsets (eight in each subset) of sexually experienced adult male rats were supplemented with three different oral doses of zinc sulphate (a daily dose of 1 mg, 5 mg and 10 mg respectively) for two weeks. A subset of eight animals without zinc supplementation was used as the control group Sexual behavior was observed by placing them individually in cages with receptive females.
Can one of the B vitamins actually improve erectile dysfunction?  The research makes a strong case that Niacin, a.k.a. Vitamin B3, does indeed do just that for a big percentage of men. Of course, this is a inexpensive help to erectile issues, as high niacin foods and supplements are cheap and readily available.  Below I summarize the most prominent human evidence to date that shows which men will likely benefit and why:
The lack of strong scientific proof that vitamin supplementation can improve erectile function doesn’t stop companies from selling vitamins, herbal supplements, and other products with the promise that they will do the job. ED is often treatable with prescription medications or medical procedures, so be careful not to get taken by a manufacturer’s empty promises.

Unfortunately, many of the same factors that brought the Italian Renaissance to an end—among them corruption, wars, and a widespread backlash over secularism and indulgence (leading to the “Bonfire of the Vanities”)—also terminated the “rebirth” in Spain. Chasing heresies became a sport that led to the resurrection of the Inquisition, which unlike its prior appearances operated completely under royal authority, rather than the aegis of the church.

A daily dose of niacin improves erectile function, particularly in men with high cholesterol, according to a 2011 study in The Journal of Sexual Medicine. The vitamin helps increase blood flow and reduce inflammation—one of the underlying causes of both high cholesterol and erectile dysfunction. “Vitamin B3 is also used to make sex hormones and other important chemical-signal molecules,” says Fisch. Like many of the others on our list, this tablet is most powerful when taken in conjunction with others: A cocktail of propionyl, L-carnitine, L-arginine, and niacin taken for three months improved 40% of erections in a study from researchers at Sapienza University of Rome in Italy.


Yohimbe bark is an herbal supplement. Its species name is Pausinystalia yohimbe. Yohimbe comes from the bark of the evergreen Corynanthe yohimbe tree, which is in the plant family called Rubiaceae. The active ingredient in yohimbe, called yohimbine, is also used to make certain medications. Civilizations in Western Africa have used it for centuries. Today it’s studied for its ability to help treat conditions including erectile dysfunction/impotence, diabetes, depression, hypotension, and overuse of certain medications.
There was a higher incidence of adverse events in those taking niacin. However, most patients could tolerate it at the maximum dosage (1,500 mg/day). With this in mind, niacin could be an alternative choice of treatment for patients with ED. Despite the success of phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5 inhibitors), such as sildenafil, only around 60–70% of patients have a satisfactory response to this class of drugs. And there are adverse effects such as headache, flushing, dyspepsia, nasal congestion, and impaired vision, including photophobia and blurred vision. Hence, there is a need to develop other therapeutic agents for those patients who do not respond satisfactorily to PDE5 inhibitors or are contraindicated for those such as sildenafil.
Minor side effects associated with erectile dysfunction medications include indigestion, runny nose and skin flushes. Sildenafil may cause temporary changes in your vision, and vardenafil may cause muscle aches and back pain. More serious side effects include hearing loss and erections that last longer than four hours. If you have cardiovascular problems, including a history of heart attacks or strokes, high or low blood pressure or vision problems such as retinitis pigmentosa, it may prove unsafe for you to take sildenafil, vardenafil or tadalafil. These medications may also interact poorly with some antibiotics, blood thinners and medications to prevent seizures and heart rhythm disorders.
Saw palmetto. Saw palmetto comes from the fruit of a small palm tree. It has been used to treat symptoms in men with an enlarged prostate gland, such as difficulty urinating, and it has been recommended to treat ED caused by an enlarged prostate. However, several recent clinical trials did not show that saw palmetto works any better on an enlarged prostate than a placebo does. "There is no evidence that saw palmetto should be used to treat erectile dysfunction," says Dr. Gilbert. Like ginkgo biloba, saw palmetto can interact with some prescription medications.
Ginkgo biloba. Ginkgo is an herb that is used in Chinese medicine that’s thought to improve blood flow. "Any ED treatment that improves blood flow may help," explains Dr. Harris. "An erection is just blood in and blood out." However, the evidence that ginkgo can improve blood flow in ED is limited, and most experts say the jury is still out. In addition, ginkgo can increase the risk for bleeding problems if combined with certain medications, such as warfarin (Coumadin).
Eggs a supplement? Yup. Testosterone is derived from cholesterol, and eggs are the healthiest way to ensure you’re getting enough of the good kind (LDL cholesterol). Plus, eggs are rich in choline, a powerful natural chemical that not only burns fat but can help set your pants afire. Choline triggers the production of nitric oxide (NO), which relaxes arteries in the penis and enables blood flow to do its thing. Choline is a precursor to acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter which controls sexual behavior through its activity in the brain; having a higher level of AcH has been associated with more frequent sex and more intense, longer orgasms. And that’s not all: Check out these things that happen to your body when you eat eggs!
Aerobic exercises and pelvic floor exercises are two of the best methods to start with. As a matter of fact, you can see improvements on your condition without having to witness the side effects of other male enhancement products. For one, there are certain male enhancement products which should not be taken if you are suffering from other types of medical condition. For instance, if the product contains substances that may react to the male enhancement ingredients of a product, you may suffer from certain consequences.
The human body only contains 2 or 3 grams of zinc at any given time. Zinc is distributed throughout the body in organs, blood, and bones. It can be difficult to diagnose zinc deficiency. While a low blood zinc level does indicate a deficiency, a normal blood level does not necessarily indicate the absence of a deficiency. And examination of the hair for zinc or a zinc taste test (ZTT) may also be used for supportive evidence in the diagnosis of zinc deficiency.
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