Some medical self-help books make niacin sound like a panacea for health-conscious people with rising cholesterol levels and shrinking budgets. Because this B vitamin is cheap and sold over-the-counter at drug and health food stores, people see no reason to check with the doctor before tossing back a handful of pills. What they may not know is that the high doses (1,500-3,000 mg) needed to lower cholesterol levels can cause serious complications. (As a dietary supplement, 10-20 mg is usually recommended). To add to the confusion, niacin comes in two forms: immediate- and sustained-release preparations.
A study published in the journal Fertility and Sterility that analyzed the effect of various fruit and vegetables on sperm quality discovered carrots had the best all-around results on sperm count and motility—a term used to describe the ability of sperm to swim towards an egg. Men who ate the most carrots saw improved sperm performance by 6.5 to 8 percent. The Harvard researchers attribute the boost to carotenoids, powerful antioxidative compounds in carrots that help the body make vitamin A.
Supplements are popular and often cheaper than prescription drugs for ED. However, supplements have not been tested to see how well they work or if they are a safe treatment for ED. Patients should know that many over-the-counter drugs have been found on drug testing to have ‘bootlegged' PDE 5 Inhibitors as their main ingredient. The amounts of Viagra, Cialis, Levitra or Stendra that may be in these supplements is not under quality control and may differ from pill to pill. The FDA has issued consumer warnings and alerts.
For men who do find themselves suffering from ED, the knee-jerk reaction can be to reach for the Viagra but – while ED tablets are an excellent solution in the short term – there are other treatment options to consider incorporating into your lifestyle on a long-term basis, one of the most straightforward being exercise. Below you’ll find four great ways that exercise may help to treat erectile dysfunction.
Three types of medications to treat erectile dysfunction -- sildenafil, vardenafil and tadalafil -- may cause low blood pressure. Niacin, used to treat conditions such as high cholesterol and hardening of the arteries, can also lower your blood pressure. If you take medications to treat male impotence, ask your doctor before combining it with niacin.
There is no evidence that mild or even moderate alcohol consumption is bad for erectile function, says Ira Sharlip, MD, a urology professor at the University of California San Francisco School of Medicine. But chronic heavy drinking can cause liver damage, nerve damage, and other conditions -- such as interfering with the normal balance of male sex hormone levels -- that can lead to ED.
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DHEA. DHEA, or dehydroepiandrosterone, is a natural hormone that the body uses to make the male hormone testosterone. DHEA and testosterone decrease with age, just as ED increases with age, so it seems that taking DHEA might protect against ED. But Harris says that "it is unlikely that taking DHEA would raise your testosterone enough to make much difference." DHEA should not be used by people with liver problems; it also has many side effects.

b) Men With Digestive Disorders.  There are many, many GI disorders that plague modern, urban dwellers:  atrophic gastritis, Crohn's, diverticulitis, enzyme deficiencies, IBS, ulcerative colities and on and on.  All of these can lower vitamin and mineral absoprtion.  Men struggling with these issues may very well benefit from increased amounts of niacin in the diet or possibly with supplementation.
Pelvic floor exercises are actually good as they can enhance the strength of the pelvic floor muscles. These exercises are commonly called Kegel exercises. These are the types of exercises that women usually perform in order to regain their muscle tone right after childbirth. They are also known to enhance urinary continence and overall male sexual health.
The paired t-test was used to assess differences in responses using various doses of yohimbine in responders and nonresponders. Responder and nonresponder changes in tumescence, rigidity, and other physiologic responses over the entire study period were compared using independent t-tests (assuming equal variances). Independent t-tests were repeated to determine whether significant differences existed in the mean numbers of risk factors, age, or side effects among groups. Matched pairs t-tests were used to compare Florida Sexual History Questionnaire responses at each dose. Finally, χ2 analysis (or Fisher's exact test when appropriate) was used to compare the two groups on dichotomous sexual satisfaction ratings at the end of the trial; 95% confidence intervals were consistently examined to determine the magnitudes of differences detected. Two-tailed P-levels were used in reporting all results. SPSS 9.0 statistical software (SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL, USA) was used for analysis.
Kegel exercises benefits a lot of men. In particular, they also help in strengthening the bulbocavernosus muscle. This very important muscle performs three types of roles. One it allows the penis to grow and be engorged with blood during erection. Second, it pumps while ejaculation, and third, it helps in emptying the urethra right after urination.

Yohimbine has had questionable effects in men with organic erectile dysfunction. We conducted this study to better define the population of men responsive to yohimbine, because tobacco was thought to affect a regimen of yohimbine more than other risk factors. We measured nocturnal penile tumescence with the RigiScan™ monitor, hormone profiles, answers to the Florida Sexual Health Questionnaire, and clinical responses at baseline and after two different doses of yohimbine in 18 nonsmoking men with erectile dysfunction. Of the 18 men, nine (50%) were successful in completing intercourse in more than 75% of attempts. The yohimbine responders were men with less severe erectile dysfunction as manifested by improved increased rigidity on RigiScan™ testing, higher Florida Sexual Health Questionnaire scores, and slightly higher levels of serum testosterone. Yohimbine is an effective therapy to treat organic erectile dysfunction in some men with erectile dysfunction.
The truth is medication or psychosexual counselling are the first treatments a doctor will suggest because they’ve been proven to work. If a doctor has approved a medication for you then it’s safe. If you would still like to see if herbal supplements work for you, then there is a list below of supplements thought to work for erectile dysfunction. Just before you invest your money in them, remember they aren’t proven to work:
Athletes or dieters sometimes use products containing yohimbe to help promote easier weight loss, especially from body fat, and to increase energy expenditure. Some have speculated that it may help increase muscle mass and endurance while cutting fat. But there’s not much evidence from studies that this is necessarily true. Yohimbe does seem to have potential to increase energy expenditure by acting as a stimulant, increasing adrenaline levels in the body and potentially preventing fatigue during or following exercise.
Dealing with erection problems can be a challenge. However, there are lots of treatments and lifestyle changes which can help. While medications such as Viagra improve symptoms in the short term, pelvic floor exercises can help you improve your sexual function in the long term. Find out why pelvic floor, also known as Kegel exercises, can be used to treat ED and how to perform the exercises correctly.

Zinc distributes all over the body, so it’s difficult to test through a blood test. If you have problems with erectile dysfunction or suspect that you might have a zinc deficiency, talk with your doctor. A medical professional will be able to check your testosterone level and determine if using zinc supplements to treat your ED is an appropriate course of action.
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