Niacin -- with or without the addition of drugs to treat impotence -- poses serious health risks, including stomach ulcers and liver damage. If you have Type 2 diabetes, taking niacin could cause drastic elevations in your blood sugar levels. Less serious side effects include stomach upset and skin flushes -- your face and chest turn red and your skin itches, tingles or burns. You can purchase niacin without a prescription, but some over-the-counter formulas -- no-flush varieties that contain niacinamide -- will unlikely help lower your cholesterol.
"Erectile dysfunction can be a very serious issue because it's a marker of underlying cardiovascular disease, and it often occurs before heart conditions become apparent. Therefore, men should consider improving their weight and overall nutrition, exercise more, drink less alcohol and have a better night's sleep, as well as address risk factors such as diabetes, high blood pressure and cholesterol.
Esposito et al (18), in their randomized study investigated the effect of physical activities on 110 obese subjects. They reported significant effect of physical activities on both body mass index and EF. The physiological rationales underlying this hypothesis are that healthy lifestyle factors are associated with maintenance of good erectile function in men (19); obesity has been positively associated with endothelial dysfunction and increased serum concentrations of vascular inflammatory markers (34, 35); and both endothelial and erectile dysfunction may share some common metabolic and vascular pathways that may be influenced by behavioral-related pathways (19, 36). Obese men with erectile dysfunction had evidence of abnormal endothelial function, which was indicated by reduced blood pressure and platelet aggregation responses to L-arginine and elevated serum concentrations of markers of low-grade inflammation, such as IL-6, IL-8, and CRP. It has been shown that there are significant associations between IEEF score and proxy indicators of elevated body fat, the vascular response to L-arginine, and circulating IL-8 and CRP levels. The association we found between IEEF score and indices of endothelial dysfunction supports the presence of common vascular pathways underlying both conditions in obese men. A disturbance in nitric oxide activity linked to reduced nitric oxide availability could provide a unifying explanation for this association. In particular, in isolated corpus cavernosum strips from patients with erectile dysfunction both neurogenic and endothelium-dependent relaxation is impaired (37).
Several studies have shown that erectile dysfunction is somehow linked to problems with cardiovascular health — which one comes first has been the question. It makes sense; the penis becomes erect through a complex system of blood vessels and spongy tissue called the corpora cavernosa — this is where the blood gets trapped, causing the erection. When problems arise through this system, whether they’re caused in the brain or through problems with the blood vessels, the penis can’t get erect.

Yohimbe is usually taken orally, but it may also be administered intravenously for certain cases. Weight is also sometimes used as a guide to determine the dosage of this supplement. A 150-pound (lb.) person should take roughly 14 mg of yohimbe per day, while those who weigh 200 lbs. and 250 lbs. should take around 18 mg and 22 mg yohimbe, respectively.
Over the years, myriad treatments and gadgets have been invented to assist with issues related to erections. They run the gamut from vacuum pumps to constriction bands, surgical implants, male hormone therapy, herbal supplements (ginkgo biloba, saw palmetto,  L- arginine, and yohimbe), and even shock-wave therapy. Lifestyle changes include: increasing exercise, decrease smoking, losing weight, and eating healthier. More natural alternative treatments include acupuncture and watermelon juice. In her hilarious and informative book entitled Bonk, researcher Mary Roach explores coupling of science and sex, and dedicates a couple of chapters to in-depth analysis of erectile dysfunction treatments.

The human body only contains 2 or 3 grams of zinc at any given time. Zinc is distributed throughout the body in organs, blood, and bones. It can be difficult to diagnose zinc deficiency. While a low blood zinc level does indicate a deficiency, a normal blood level does not necessarily indicate the absence of a deficiency. And examination of the hair for zinc or a zinc taste test (ZTT) may also be used for supportive evidence in the diagnosis of zinc deficiency.
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