According to the FDA (Food and Drug Administration), many of these products sold on the internet contain potentially harmful compounds. And they aren’t listed on the label. In an investigation, the FDA found that one-third of these online supplements were laced with undisclosed ingredients. This includes sildenafil—the active ingredient in Viagra. Doctors prescribe Viagra to some patients, but it’s not safe for everyone. The drug could interact with other medications and lower your blood pressure to dangerous levels. This makes ordering supplements online risky. You don’t know whether they contain sildenafil or other ingredients that could harm your health. 
Having your current medication checked – if you are taking medication already, it could be that your erection problems are a side effect. Have a doctor check whether this is the cause of your problems and if it is, you might be able to switch medications and then find that your erectile dysfunction goes away completely – or at least improves. Medications that can cause erection problems include:
Stimulant drugs speed up the nervous system. By speeding up the nervous system, stimulant medications can make you feel jittery and speed up your heartbeat. Yohimbe might also speed up the nervous system. Taking yohimbe along with stimulant drugs might cause serious problems including increased heart rate and high blood pressure. Avoid taking stimulant drugs along with yohimbe.
Yohimbe has been found to increase circulation to the erectile tissues; aiding in the resolution of physiological and psychogenic (mental/emotional) impotence. Impotence, the inability to sustain erection, is the most common sexual disorder among men. Yohimbine is the active component found in yohimbe bark. Yohimbine has been shown to dilate the blood vessels and lower blood pressure, which enlarges the vessels in the sexual organs and increases reflex excitability in the lower spinal cord. In many cases, yohimbe has shown to make erections firmer. It is thought to help sustain an erection by causing compression and preventing blood to flow back out of the penis while sexually aroused.
Suggested intake: “The problem with yohimbine is that you can’t regulate the amount in a dosage,” says Fratellone. “It all depends on what part of the tree it comes from, how it’s cultivated, how it’s exported, and so on. The amount of extract you get will vary.” FDA researchers analyzed a number of over-the-counter yohimbe bark products. They found that the supplements contained only seven percent or less of the amount of yohimbine that would be found in actual yohimbe bark, which suggests that they contained little or no yohimbe. However, the prescription form of yohimbine is strictly regulated by the FDA. It is approved only for the treatment of impotence, and is available in tablets and capsules. For erectile dysfunction, 5.4 to 10 milligrams three times daily has been studied and regarded as generally safe.
Few men want to talk about their inability to get or maintain an erection, however, erectile dysfunction can have a profound impact on relationships and self-esteem. Fortunately, trouble in the bedroom doesn't necessarily mean you're dealing with erectile dysfunction. Most men will have problems with an erection at some point in their sexual history. But one bad day in the bedroom doesn't mean major sexual health problems. So how can you know if you're dealing with erectile dysfunction?
In the human body, folic acid interacts with vitamin B12, pantothenic acid, and vitamin B7 (also called vitamin H or biotin). The signs of biotin deficiency can be hair loss, skin inflammation, skin pallor, mucous membrane inflammation, depression, drowsiness, anemia, blood sugar disorders, muscle pain, poor appetite, nausea, and insomnia. Besides, a person feels tired, irritable and depressed. Consequently, male libido and sexual activity reduce. In turn, this negatively affects sexual performance.
Physical exercises are only one part of overcoming sexual dysfunctions. If you're serious about restoring full control sexually then you need to understand which of your current thoughts and actions are causing your failure. After you understand how your problem works, THEN you can apply the correct thought and action sequence to stay in control sexually!

Yohimbine has had questionable effects in men with organic erectile dysfunction. We conducted this study to better define the population of men responsive to yohimbine, because tobacco was thought to affect a regimen of yohimbine more than other risk factors. We measured nocturnal penile tumescence with the RigiScan™ monitor, hormone profiles, answers to the Florida Sexual Health Questionnaire, and clinical responses at baseline and after two different doses of yohimbine in 18 nonsmoking men with erectile dysfunction. Of the 18 men, nine (50%) were successful in completing intercourse in more than 75% of attempts. The yohimbine responders were men with less severe erectile dysfunction as manifested by improved increased rigidity on RigiScan™ testing, higher Florida Sexual Health Questionnaire scores, and slightly higher levels of serum testosterone. Yohimbine is an effective therapy to treat organic erectile dysfunction in some men with erectile dysfunction.
Nocturnal penile tumescence and rigidity monitoring using tumescence and rigidity activity units measure the area under the curve of activity divided by the time slept so that varying sleep times may be compared. All four parameters of base and tip tumescence and rigidity rose more in responders than in nonresponders (Table 5). Most changes showed either a trend toward significance or achieved statistical significance. Baseline tip rigidity activity units and tip tumescence activity unit scores differed significantly between groups (P=0.038 and P=0.026, respectively). In fact, nearly all of the baseline values were higher in the responders compared with the nonresponders. Responder tip tumescence activity unit scores increased steadily, whereas nonresponder scores dropped negligibly with the 10.8 mg tid dose. Responders had a significantly higher final score while taking the 10.8-mg dose (P=0.010). Responder tip rigidity activity unit scores also increased steadily, whereas nonresponder scores increased at the second dose, then fell again at the final dose. The mean tip rigidity activity unit score of the responders was significantly higher than that of the nonresponders with the 5.4-mg tid dose (P=0.011). The final scores of the responders were almost twice those of the nonresponders as well (significant where P=0.041). Base rigidity activity unit scores did not differ significantly between the two groups, although the increased responder scores with the initial dose of yohimbine was greater than that of the nonresponders (trend where P=0.065). Finally, base tumescence activity unit scores of the responders who were taking high doses of yohimbine were significantly higher (P=0.009).
You may know horny goat weed from its omnipresence behind the counter at your local convenience store, but this traditional Chinese formula is less sketchy than it sounds. Used for centuries to treat low libido and erectile dysfunction, the herb’s potential efficacy was show in a 2010 study published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine. Researchers who fed the supplement to rats found they had improved erectile function; another study showed that the supplement can block a natural chemical that wilts erections. (Just be warned: Viagra was found to be 80 times more powerful.)
The lack of strong scientific proof that vitamin supplementation can improve erectile function doesn’t stop companies from selling vitamins, herbal supplements, and other products with the promise that they will do the job. ED is often treatable with prescription medications or medical procedures, so be careful not to get taken by a manufacturer’s empty promises.

An Italian study in 1994 on 63 patients with psychogenic impotence showed that yohimbine, the active ingredient in the inner bark of the Yohimbe tree, improves libido and sexual stimulation. Half of the patients were given 15mg orally of yohimbine and the antidepressant trazodone 50mg orally per day, the other half a placebo, over an 8-week period. Of the half that received the yohimbine, 71 percent had an increase in sexual desire, erectile function, and ejaculation, as compared with only 22 percent in the placebo group. Patients receiving the placebo then were given the yohimbine tablets over a new 8-week course and of that group, 74 percent showed improvement. After a 3- and 6-month follow-up, positive results were maintained in 58 percent of the patients. To me this is very notable, as the antidepressant trazodone is known to cause sexual dysfunction as a side effect.
A conflicting study of 22 subjects found that a 100mg daily dose of yohimbine for 30 days did not significantly improve penile rigidity. Three subjects experienced a notable increase in penile rigidity and twelve subject experience a partial increase in rigidity. [13] These findings do not completely discount the use of yohimbine to treat erectile dysfunction, but do suggest the compound's effects, even at very high dosages, will cause varying responses across a similar population.
They found that men who exercised the most were also the most likely to have higher scores in sexual function. Specifically, those who expended 18 METS, or metabolic equivalents, per week were most likely to enjoy sex. METS is a physiological measurement that denotes the amount of energy a person spends on a specific activity, as well as the intensity of it. According to the researchers, 18 METS was equal to about two hours of strenuous exercise like running or swimming, 3.5 hours of moderate-intensity exercise, or six hours of light exercise.   
Cai, T., Verze, P., Massenio, P., Tiscione, D., Malossini, G., Cormio, L. ... Mirone, V. (2016, August 12). Rhodiola rosea, folic acid, zinc and biotin (EndEP®) is able to improve ejaculatory control in patients affected by lifelong premature ejaculation: Results from a phase I II study. Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine, 12(4), 2083-2087. Retrieved from https://www.spandidos-publications.com/10.3892/etm.2016.3595
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