Three types of medications to treat erectile dysfunction -- sildenafil, vardenafil and tadalafil -- may cause low blood pressure. Niacin, used to treat conditions such as high cholesterol and hardening of the arteries, can also lower your blood pressure. If you take medications to treat male impotence, ask your doctor before combining it with niacin.
The improvements in IIEF-erectile function domain (IIEF-EF) score for moderate and severe ED patients in the niacin group were 3.31 and 5.28 and in the placebo group were 2.74 and 2.65, respectively. In the lower range of mild and mild-to-moderate ED, there was no significant improvement in erectile function. Of the 160 patients in the study, 32 were using statins; 18 in the niacin group and 14 in the placebo group. For patients not receiving statin treatment, there was a significant improvement in IIEF-Q3 scores (0.47) for the niacin group, but not for the placebo group. To summarize, niacin alone can improve the erectile function in patients suffering from moderate to severe ED and dyslipidemia.

Researchers at Johns Hopkins University last year looked at 3,400 healthy Americans and found that men who were vitamin D deficient were 32% more likely to have trouble getting it up than those with sufficient levels, even after adjusting for other ED risk factors. In fact, the connection is so common, Walker says D levels are something he always checks in ED patients. Why? The sunshine vitamin is crucial for keeping the endothelial cells that line blood vessels healthy. Without enough of the stuff, blood flow is inhibited, affecting everything from your heart to your hard-on.
Twenty-one men were screened. Two were rejected because they had normal results on nocturnal penile study, and one man was excluded from the study because of a protocol violation. Eighteen men completed the study. The mean age of the men was 60.2 y (range, 34–69 y). The mean duration of erectile dysfunction was 3.1 y (range, 1–10 y). All men were in stable heterosexual relationships. The listed medical risk factors for erectile dysfunction were hypertension in nine men, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in seven, single offending medication in seven (mostly beta-blockers), multiple medications in five, diabetes mellitus in four (one with neuropathy), venous leakage in two, and peripheral vascular insufficiency in one.
Many studies have been conducted on this topic; their results have been challenged by lack of controlled groups and non-randomization. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are generally accepted as the most valid method for determining the efficacy of a therapeutic intervention, because the biases associated with other experimental designs can be avoided.Non-randomized controlled trials, can detect associations between an intervention and an outcome. But they cannot rule out the possibility that the association was caused by a third factor linked to both intervention and outcome. Random allocation ensures no systematic differences between intervention groups in factors, known and unknown, that may affect outcome. Randomized controlled trials are the most rigorous way of determining whether a cause-effect relation exists between treatment and outcome and for assessing the cost effectiveness of a treatment (45, 22).

Lastly, it should be remembered that many individuals without dyslipidemia take niacin as a preventative measure. If you plan to take more than about 800 mg of niacin a day, it is a good idea to have your liver tested periodically just to make sure that your liver has no problem with high-dose niacin. These liver tests are the same used to check for liver toxicity in people taking statins, from which there is a higher likelihood of liver toxicity compared to taking niacin. The principal problem from taking statins is muscle damage which is serious enough to be life-threatening. This problem does not occur with those who take niacin. Not to be forgotten, niacin has been found to prolong orgasm.

Can one of the B vitamins actually improve erectile dysfunction?  The research makes a strong case that Niacin, a.k.a. Vitamin B3, does indeed do just that for a big percentage of men. Of course, this is a inexpensive help to erectile issues, as high niacin foods and supplements are cheap and readily available.  Below I summarize the most prominent human evidence to date that shows which men will likely benefit and why:
When stimulated by the nerves, the spongy tissue arranges itself in such a way that more blood can be stored in the penis. The veins running through the outer sheath of the penis then compress which stops the blood from leaving the penis. As the blood is stopped from flowing out, the penis fills with blood and stretches within the outer casing, giving an erection.
Are you reading article after article wondering how to put a stop to erectile dysfunction? There is no shame in suffering from erectile dysfunction, being as common condition as it is, erectile dysfunction is one of the leading health problems in men. The researchers suggest that every man will suffer from erectile dysfunction at some point of their life. So, if you have been wandering the Internet with the hope of finding out about the ways you could use to cure your condition, or if you want to get informed about the topic of erectile dysfunction, you are in the right place.
We have presented objective evidence that yohimbine has a positive effect in men with organic erectile dysfunction. This is contrary to the blanket statement of the American Urological Association in their clinical guidelines for erectile dysfunction, which states: ‘Based on the data to date, yohimbine does not appear to be effective for erectile dysfunction and, thus, it should not be recommended as treatment for the standard patient.’17 Our data strongly suggest that yohimbine treatment should be revisited. Our study was observational with dose-escalation just to see if there was any rationale to expect any effect in men with organic erectile dysfunction, especially in men who do not have the risk factor of tobacco abuse. The next step would be a double-blind, placebo-controlled study using yohimbine in smokers vs non-smokers to verify the current observation. We believe that our data justify such a trial. Yohimbine will never be a first-line drug for erectile dysfunction, but may be useful in subsets of men with mild disease or few risk factors. Yohimbine might also be useful in combination therapy with other treatment modalities such as sildenafil and intraurethral alprostadil, when they do not produce adequate effects alone, as has already been shown with naloxone39 or trazedone.40

Data from the Florida Sexual History Questionnaire collected at each time period (baseline, 5.4 mg tid and 10.8 mg tid) are presented in Table 6. Three patients (two responders and one nonresponder) did not complete the entire questionnaire for each study period and were excluded from the analyses. Thus, data in the table and statistical analyses are based on the responses of seven responders and eight nonresponders.


Erection is a complex physiological process in which vascular factors play a pre-eminent role. Therapeutic options for men with arteriogenic erectile dysfunction (ED) are mainly administration of phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, intracavernous injections of vasoactive agents (for example, prostaglandin El, papaverine/phentolamine, or triple drug), intraurethral administration of prostaglandin El, and administration of centrally acting drugs (11, 12). However, all of these methods circumvent the patient's problem temporarily, and patients are not cured of impotence, they will remain dependent on these treatments for the remainder of their sexually active lives. An effective treatment that cures the problem permanently is needed where penile revascularization and exercise remain treatment options for such patients. However, due to the complexity of penile revascularization such as cost ineffectiveness, unavailability of experts, side effects of surgery and high failure rates among the elderly (13) have left people with ED at the mercy of exercise.

This study was designed to test the hypothesis that hydrochlorothiazide a diuretic used to treat hypertension depletes body zinc and thereby cause sexual dysfunction. Serum zinc and sexual dysfunction were measured in 39 middle aged hypertensive men who had been taking hydrochlorothiazide in average daily doses of between 25 and 50 mg daily for at least six months, and a control group of 27 unmedicated middle aged normotensive men. The medicated group had a higher incidence of sexual dysfunction (56 pc) as compared to 11 pc in the control group. The use of hydrochlorothiazide did affect serum zinc levels significantly in 20 patients. Sexual dysfunction occurred more often in older and overweight patients (p < 0.004). Three of the normotensive men experienced sexual dysfunction probably related to old age. Twenty two of the 39 on hydrochlorothiazide and experiencing sexual dysfunction were divided into two groups of 11 patients. Bloods were taken from the 27 normotensive and 22 hypertensive men receiving hydrochlorothiazide for the analyses of zinc. Subsequently one group of the patients were supplemented with zinc 500 mg daily for 30 days while the other group was supplemented with magnesium chloride 1 g daily for 30 days. The normotensive men were not treated. After 30 days, bloods were again taken from the three groups of analyses for zinc and magnesium. Serum zinc was significantly decreased (p < 0.05) by hydrochlorothiazide and a non significant decrease in serum magnesium (p = ns) was observed. After supplementation with zinc, the serum zinc levels returned to normal only in eight patients. There was improvement in the symptoms of sexual dysfunction in five patients. Two patients gained weight. Hydrochlorothiazide decreased serum zinc levels (p < 0.05) and was unchanged with magnesium supplementation but the serum magnesium returned to normal values. Improvement of symptoms of sexual dysfunction was positive in one patient. This study shows that low serum zinc levels may be associated with sexual dysfunction but the definitive role of zinc in the pathogenesis of sexual dysfunction will remain controversial.
One of the keys to addressing erectile dysfunction is improving the functioning of the endothelium, which is the inner lining of blood vessels. Wayne Hellstrom, MD, urology professor at Tulane University School of Medicine says keeping endothelium healthy can help you improve erectile functioning. Cardio training helps with this, as does resistance training. Adding weight training to cardio training increases muscle mass and bone strength helps your balance and stability (which can help prevent injuries) and can help lower blood pressure as well. Improved muscle definition can also be great for self-esteem, and that can’t hurt.
*all photos are models and not actual patients.If you are interested in a prescription product, Hims will assist in setting up a visit for you with an independent physician who will evaluate whether or not you are an appropriate candidate for the prescription product and if appropriate, may write you a prescription for the product which you can fill at the pharmacy of your choice.
Stress is another main cause of impotence in men. Psychological stress lowers libido in general and may suppress a man’s ability to become aroused, causing impotence. This is usually temporary and is easier to reverse than cases of physiological impotence. Nonetheless it is extremely important to manage stress levels when working to reverse impotence. Whether a man is experiencing impotence due to physiological reasons or psychological reasons, stress plays a key role. Any man that is experiencing erectile dysfunction will experience higher levels of stress because of the condition itself. Stress management skills need to be in place when working to reverse impotence.
Just because a product claims to be natural doesn't mean it's safe. Many herbal remedies and dietary supplements can cause side effects and dangerous interactions when taken with certain medications. Talk to your doctor before you try an alternative treatment for erectile dysfunction — especially if you're taking medications or you have a chronic health problem such as heart disease or diabetes.

Weak erection is one of the most embarrassing problems in this world because i was always shy to meet new partners due to the fact that i already know that i cannot perform at all and even when i did i was so weak. I could only last 45 seconds and this this made me to ask myself many a times if i am a man, four of my girlfriends left me due to this problem. In my search for a cure and a solution i told an old friend all i have been facing and he told me about Dr. MACK how he helped him save his marriage using his very effective ED medicine which restored back his erection. I contacted him and he sent me the medicine and that is one of the best decision i have ever made in my entire life. I think this will help someone out there if you have any ED related problem do not hesitate to contact [email protected] com i know he can help you.
When men are given supplemental testosterone it can have positive effects on erectile dysfunction as well as the “grumpy old men” syndrome of low energy, loss of drive, low libido, and loss of endurance as well as “man boobs”.  Zinc has a direct effect on the two main enzyme systems that act on testosterone: conversion of testosterone to estrogen via aromatase and the conversion of testosterone to DHT by 5 alpha reductase.   Zinc blocks the testosterone to estrogen pathway leading to more testosterone.  It turns out that only at really high zinc levels does zinc inhibit the 5 alpha reductase enzyme so when we give mild to moderate zinc supplements, DHT actually increases because there is more testosterone to feed into this pathway.   This actually benefits things because DHT has 2-3 times the times the androgen receptor affinity than testosterone.  In any case, we see an increase of testosterone and androgenic activity from DHT with zinc supplements and whether a guy has low or normal T to begin with, there is a positive change in erectile dysfunction and libido in some men due to the increased androgenic activity and less estrogen pulling in the opposite direction.  Conversely we see testosterone levels drop when a diet is low in Zinc as well as a drop in DHT.  It is important to note that this effect of increased testosterone with zinc supplementation, while well established, does not always lead to an improvement of ED and increased Libido.
Yohimbe supplements often list yohimbe bark extract or yohimbine as the active ingredient. However, some of these products might not provide accurate information about the amount of yohimbine in the supplement. Also, some yohimbe supplements list yohimbine hydrochloride as an active ingredient. Yohimbe products containing man-made yohimbine hydrochloride as an ingredient are not legal to sell as a dietary supplement in the US.
Minor side effects associated with erectile dysfunction medications include indigestion, runny nose and skin flushes. Sildenafil may cause temporary changes in your vision, and vardenafil may cause muscle aches and back pain. More serious side effects include hearing loss and erections that last longer than four hours. If you have cardiovascular problems, including a history of heart attacks or strokes, high or low blood pressure or vision problems such as retinitis pigmentosa, it may prove unsafe for you to take sildenafil, vardenafil or tadalafil. These medications may also interact poorly with some antibiotics, blood thinners and medications to prevent seizures and heart rhythm disorders.

The final study we will be examining in this article took a novel approach to by dosing 16 healthy male subjects with 7.7 milligrams of yohimbine tartrate and 6 grams of L-arginine glutamate and comparing it to a placebo. Depending on their group each subject was randomly assigned to consume the placebo one week and the novel compound the other week.
This study was designed to test the hypothesis that hydrochlorothiazide a diuretic used to treat hypertension depletes body zinc and thereby cause sexual dysfunction. Serum zinc and sexual dysfunction were measured in 39 middle aged hypertensive men who had been taking hydrochlorothiazide in average daily doses of between 25 and 50 mg daily for at least six months, and a control group of 27 unmedicated middle aged normotensive men. The medicated group had a higher incidence of sexual dysfunction (56 pc) as compared to 11 pc in the control group. The use of hydrochlorothiazide did affect serum zinc levels significantly in 20 patients. Sexual dysfunction occurred more often in older and overweight patients (p < 0.004). Three of the normotensive men experienced sexual dysfunction probably related to old age. Twenty two of the 39 on hydrochlorothiazide and experiencing sexual dysfunction were divided into two groups of 11 patients. Bloods were taken from the 27 normotensive and 22 hypertensive men receiving hydrochlorothiazide for the analyses of zinc. Subsequently one group of the patients were supplemented with zinc 500 mg daily for 30 days while the other group was supplemented with magnesium chloride 1 g daily for 30 days. The normotensive men were not treated. After 30 days, bloods were again taken from the three groups of analyses for zinc and magnesium. Serum zinc was significantly decreased (p < 0.05) by hydrochlorothiazide and a non significant decrease in serum magnesium (p = ns) was observed. After supplementation with zinc, the serum zinc levels returned to normal only in eight patients. There was improvement in the symptoms of sexual dysfunction in five patients. Two patients gained weight. Hydrochlorothiazide decreased serum zinc levels (p < 0.05) and was unchanged with magnesium supplementation but the serum magnesium returned to normal values. Improvement of symptoms of sexual dysfunction was positive in one patient. This study shows that low serum zinc levels may be associated with sexual dysfunction but the definitive role of zinc in the pathogenesis of sexual dysfunction will remain controversial.
However, a recent study that involves yohimbe supplementation to athletes ended with an unsatisfactory result. According to this study, yohimbe did not have any significant effects on body mass, muscle mass and exercise performance even after it was taken for 21 days. Even though it helped burn body fat, it may not be a useful supplement for boosting endurance.9

The mind and body are intricately connected, and exploring this connection can help you combat stress and fatigue, both of which can contribute to erectile dysfunction. Adding mind-body exercise to your life helps lower stress, improve breathing, and reduce general tension. Yoga can also be terrific for improving your sense of well-being, and it’s great for helping keep you limber so you reduce the risk of sports-related injuries. Partnered yoga classes and routines let men engage in relaxing and beneficial exercise with their partners, and there are even specific yoga postures designed to improve blood circulation to the pelvic region.
Yes, niacin is good for erectile dysfunction. Vitamin B3 or Niacin acts as a powerful agent to improve the condition of erectile dysfunction and a research study conducted in a medical center of Hong Kong confirmed that Niacin supplementation has resulted in the increase of blood flow across the pelvic region in men. In addition, researchers have further confirmed that the Vitamin comes with the ability to unclog various harmful fats collected in the artery region.

The researchers reasoned from other studies that when the degree of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis are more severe, the effects of niacin and statins as lipid-lowering agents are also more apparent. Their current study seemed to bear this out. Also, in another study assessing the effect of a PDE5 inhibitor in patients using a statin, patients with higher baseline serum LDL-C had better improvement in erectile function after the use of a PDE5 inhibitor. This supports the researchers’ hypothesis that patients with potentially more serious endothelial dysfunction, such as those with higher LDL-C levels, may have better response to the combination usage of a PDE5 inhibitor and niacin.
When it comes to maintaining your libido, the B vitamins, found in beef, liver, and fish, are all your wingmen, but niacin (a.k.a. Vitamin B3) is especially helpful. In a study published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine, men suffering from impotence who took a niacin supplement reported a significant improvement in their bedroom performance than men who took a placebo. Stock up on these best foods to eat for niacin!

The mind and body are intricately connected, and exploring this connection can help you combat stress and fatigue, both of which can contribute to erectile dysfunction. Adding mind-body exercise to your life helps lower stress, improve breathing, and reduce general tension. Yoga can also be terrific for improving your sense of well-being, and it’s great for helping keep you limber so you reduce the risk of sports-related injuries. Partnered yoga classes and routines let men engage in relaxing and beneficial exercise with their partners, and there are even specific yoga postures designed to improve blood circulation to the pelvic region.

DHEA. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is a hormone produced in your body’s adrenal gland that aids in the production of testosterone and other hormones. Since testosterone is critical for healthy male sexuality, supplementing with DHEA may help with issues like sluggish libido and impotence. One double-blind, placebo-controlled study found subjects given 50 milligrams of DHEA every day for six months experienced improvement in symptoms of E.D.
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