Two years ago I took regular Niacine for about a year to lower LDL and increase HDL. I did not want to take Statins because of its side effects. I was being monitored by my Dr. because of the effect on liver enzymes. I took 1.5 gr together with Phytosterols. The treatment was effective and the only side effect were the flushes which I found could be eliminated by having 500 mg at the end of each of the 3 main meals. I stopped treatment for a year or so, but now the Dr. suggested I start taking Niacine. or Statins. I chose Niacine (Nicotine Acid) and started with 500 mgs for 3 days; increased it to 1000 mgs. for 4 more days, until I increased it to 500 mgs x 3 for a total of 1.5 grms/day taking 500 mgms/meal. I started noticing my gradual decrease in libido this time almost inmediately. I do not take any other medicines as such I'm definitely inclined to blame Niacine because I have taken Phytosterols for 3 years and my libido was fine. I'm a senior. Hope this will help!
Researchers in London set out to find out if the claims about Yohimbe were true. Could the bark of a tree actually increase libido and improve impotence? They performed a double-blind trial using yohimbine for the treatment of erection inadequacy. Men, aged 18-70 years, seeking help for the secondary erection inadequacy for 6 months or longer, took part in the trial. None of the participants had any serious psychiatric disease, hypertension or liver insufficiency. Half of the men were given 5.4mg of yohimbine, the other half a placebo, for 8 weeks. Patients were assessed in 4-week intervals. After 8 weeks of treatment, 37 percent said they had good erections, as compared to only 13% in the placebo group. After the 8-week treatment, the placebo group was given the yohimbine as well, results for improved stimulated erection after the second 8-week trial increased to a total of 42 percent overall.
So, in establishing physiology, pharmacology, clinical results and safety, zinc is a good choice when you look at cost and side effect profile as well as ease of availability and interaction profile with other meds and other medical conditions.  Having said all of this, there is no bulletproof evidence out there guaranteeing that increasing your zinc consumption either in food or via a supplement will improve ED or increase libido.  Even if a patient experiences an increase in testosterone from such a supplementation, this is not a certain gateway to resolution of theses symptoms as there is more to it than just one hormone level.  However for those that are experiencing problems in these areas, it is certainly worth a try for them.  The patient should be mindful however that supplements should be treated like any other medication and trying to increase your testosterone shouldn’t be done without consultation with your doctor and pharmacist.  You should also check for any interactions with any meds or medical conditions before trying any supplement as well.
Minor side effects associated with erectile dysfunction medications include indigestion, runny nose and skin flushes. Sildenafil may cause temporary changes in your vision, and vardenafil may cause muscle aches and back pain. More serious side effects include hearing loss and erections that last longer than four hours. If you have cardiovascular problems, including a history of heart attacks or strokes, high or low blood pressure or vision problems such as retinitis pigmentosa, it may prove unsafe for you to take sildenafil, vardenafil or tadalafil. These medications may also interact poorly with some antibiotics, blood thinners and medications to prevent seizures and heart rhythm disorders.

Zinc affects different aspects of mammalian reproduction. Testicular disruption, impaired spermatogenesis and subsequent poor semen parameters are found in males with zinc deficiency. Testicular concentration of zinc was lower in male sheep fed with zinc deficient diets. The same animals showed smaller seminiferous tubules and less lumen development than the controls.[1] Similarly variable degrees of maturation arrest in different stages of spermatogenesis with reduced diameter of seminiferous tubules were noted when rats were fed with zinc deficient diets.[2] Zinc deficiency causes a reduction in the structural parameters of seminiferous tubules influences serum levels of testosterone (T) and prolactin (PRL) in rats.[3,4]

In a 2005 study, three months of twice-daily sets of kegel exercises combined with biofeedback and advice on lifestyle changes, such as quitting smoking, losing weight, and limiting alcohol, worked far better than just giving the participants advice. “Wearing tight pants will affect impotence along with some other medical conditions like diabetes and heart disease,” which can also affect a man’s degree of impotence, Dr. Jennifer Burns, specializing in family practice with an emphasis on gastrointestinal health at the BienEtre Center, told Medical Daily.
Certain drugs can also deplete zinc levels, including: ACE inhibitors, thiazide diuretics and acid-reducing drugs like Prliosec and Pepcid. Eating a high grain diet in which the grains have not been pre-soaked or sprouted, can also inhibit the uptake of zinc in the body, due to the phytic acid content. Soaking or sprouting grains and rinsing off the soak-water prior to cooking significantly reduces the phytic acid content in grains.
Besides, niacin’s beneficial effects became more evident when the Hong Kong study researchers excluded those already using statin therapy. If there is an overlapping effect of these two groups of lipid-lowering agents on endothelial function, this would make sense. Also, chronic statin use could lessen the effect of niacin on endothelial function and hence affect improvement in erectile function.
But researchers emphasize that immediate-release niacin should remain as a treatment option for high cholesterol. "The point of our study is not that niacin should be avoided, but that the immediate-release preparation is the preferred form, and that medical supervision and evaluation are necessary for people taking this drug," said James McKenney, professor and chairman of the division of clinical pharmacy at the Medical College of Virginia.

If you’re experiencing psychological ED, you may benefit from talk therapy. Therapy can help you manage your mental health. You’ll likely work with your therapist over several sessions, and your therapist will address things like major stress or anxiety factors, feelings around sex, or subconscious conflicts that could be affecting your sexual well-being.
b) Men With Digestive Disorders.  There are many, many GI disorders that plague modern, urban dwellers:  atrophic gastritis, Crohn's, diverticulitis, enzyme deficiencies, IBS, ulcerative colities and on and on.  All of these can lower vitamin and mineral absoprtion.  Men struggling with these issues may very well benefit from increased amounts of niacin in the diet or possibly with supplementation.
How it works: Rhodiola works in supporting our adrenal glands by preventing the breakdown of too much dopamine and serotonin during stressful times, leaving enough for us to remain buoyant and energized. What’s extra fun about Rhodiola is that it works fast – in 30 minutes – to change your energy levels and focus – so pop one before you think you want to get frisky.

If you’ve been to the health food store lately, you’ve seen shelves lined with vitamins and “organic” supplements, each claiming to boost immunity, revitalize organ function, or “promote health.” And it’s working. Supplements are currently a $30 billion industry in the US, with more than 90,000 products on the market, and vitamin use is on the rise. In fact, a recent survey in Journal of American Medicine Association showed that “52% of US adults reported use of at least 1 supplement product.”
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