In the human body, folic acid interacts with vitamin B12, pantothenic acid, and vitamin B7 (also called vitamin H or biotin). The signs of biotin deficiency can be hair loss, skin inflammation, skin pallor, mucous membrane inflammation, depression, drowsiness, anemia, blood sugar disorders, muscle pain, poor appetite, nausea, and insomnia. Besides, a person feels tired, irritable and depressed. Consequently, male libido and sexual activity reduce. In turn, this negatively affects sexual performance.
I use magnesium and zinc. I don’t find any difference with zinc but about 10 minutes after I pop a magnesium I’m all ready to go! But diet comes first! I went vegan about 10 weeks ago (and I’ll never look back) but I also quit my hormonal birth control about 3 weeks ago so my sex drive is at a big fat ZERO. But like I said, when I take a magnesium it still manages to come back. Mine you, I have a boyfriend who I’ve been with for 4 and a half years and I have so much love for him! But I wanna feel sexy everyday! I am losing weight so that will help and I’ve heard amazing things about Pine Pollen (tinture for men and powder for women) check it out! 🙂

But in this case, zinc is much harder to absorb. This explains a decrease in testosterone levels in vegetarians. Slippery jack mushrooms, button mushrooms, beef liver, and fish are also rich in zinc. They are followed by breadstuffs, egg yolk, rabbit, chicken, beans, tea, and cocoa. In addition, zinc is found in onions, garlic, and rice. And a very small amount of zinc is available in fruits, vegetables, and milk.

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The researchers noted that "when patients were stratified according to the baseline severity of ED, the patients with moderate and severe ED who received niacin showed a significant improvement in IIEF-Q3 scores (0.56 0.96 [P = 0.037] and 1.03 1.20 [P < 0.001], respectively) and IIEF-Q4 scores (0.56 1.03 [P = 0.048] and 0.84 1.05 [P < 0.001], respectively] compared with baseline values, but not for the placebo group...For patients not receiving statins treatment, there was a significant improvement in IIEF-Q3 scores (0.47 1.16 [P = 0.004]) for the niacin group, but not for the placebo group. Niacin alone can improve the erectile function in patients suffering from moderate to severe ED and dyslipidemia." [3]
Niacin or Vitamin B3 has proved to be helpful in improving both lipid levels and cholesterol among patients suffering from the problem of atherosclerosis i.e. accumulation of waste fats across the walls of the human blood vessel. Because of this, Niacin is helpful in the treatment of erectile dysfunction, as ED and atherosclerosis have more or less similar causes.
Responders tended to have consistently higher scores compared with nonresponders. For nonresponders, none of the scores was significantly different when comparing baseline scores with either of the yohimbine doses. However, a trend toward an improved total questionnaire score was noted from baseline to the 5.4 mg tid dose (P=0.083). For responders, a significant increase in the Florida Sexual History Questionnaire total score was observed from baseline to the time the 5.4-mg tid dose was administered (P=0.021). A trend closely approaching statistical significance (P=0.055) was noted from baseline to the administration of the 10.8 mg tid dose of yohimbine. Inspection of changes in the individual items revealed that responders reported significantly greater frequency of vaginal penetration with both the 5.4- and 10.8-mg doses of yohimbine tid compared with baseline (P=0.010 and P=0.010, respectively). Participants also noted less difficulty obtaining an erection for sexual intercourse while taking 10.8 mg of the drug compared with baseline (P=0.011). Responders reported having significantly less difficulty maintaining an erection for sexual intercourse compared with baseline with both the 5.4-mg tid dose (P=0.049) and the 10.8-mg tid dose (P<0.001). Responders also reported significantly greater penile firmness and rigidity before intercourse or masturbation in both treatment conditions compared with baseline (P=0.02 for the 5.4-mg tid dose and P=0.013 for the 10.8-mg tid dose).

Most human studies completed thus-far examine the impact of oral yohimbine consumption on erectile dysfunction (ED) in males. A meta-analysis of seven randomized, placebo-controlled trials found that yohimbine is significantly more effective in treating ED compared to placebo. [11] These findings did not compare yohimbine to prescription medications like Viagra®, which are designed to treat ED.
While the rationale behind why it would work is airtight, the research on arginine’s actual effect on erectile dysfunction is slim, points out Charles Walker, M.D., assistant professor of urology and cofounder of the Cardiovascular and Sexual Health clinic at Yale University. But given its solid safety profile, minimal side effects, and potential benefit on heart disease, it’s worth a try, he adds, especially when taken in conjunction with other herbs on this list, which studies have shown can be more effective.
[notice color=’#ebebeb’]Folic acid is very crucial for men since it stimulates the sperm production and improves the function of the cardiovascular system. And this, in turn, contributes to the improvement of sexual function in men. Therefore, if you use vitamin B9 for erectile dysfunction treatment, you will improve your male potency as well.[/notice]
This is one B team you want to get on pronto: A recent report from Harvard University highlighted a study that has linked low levels of B12 to erectile dysfunction. A causal link hasn’t been nailed down, but the B vitamin is used by every system in the body, particularly in cell metabolism and the production of blood — two essential factors in getting and keeping a quality erection.
DHEA. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is a hormone produced in your body’s adrenal gland that aids in the production of testosterone and other hormones. Since testosterone is critical for healthy male sexuality, supplementing with DHEA may help with issues like sluggish libido and impotence. One double-blind, placebo-controlled study found subjects given 50 milligrams of DHEA every day for six months experienced improvement in symptoms of E.D.
Controlling stress, having a healthy diet, and getting enough sleep to create a good foundation for sexual satisfaction. But sometimes the basics aren’t quite enough. Millions of men experience erectile dysfunction (ED), but ED can usually be successfully treated with prescription medications like Viagra, Levitra, Staxyn, and Cialis. These drugs have helped men understand that ED isn’t all in their mind, have opened up the topic to a more honest discussion, and have transformed many men’s sex lives.
In fact, one common reason many younger men visit their doctor is to get erectile dysfunction medication. Often, men with erectile dysfunction suffer with diabetes or heart disease, or may be sedentary or obese, but they don’t realize the impact of these health conditions on sexual function. Along with erectile dysfunction treatment, the doctor may recommend managing the illness, being more physically active, or losing weight.
It promotes the formation of red blood cells, enhances cellular metabolism, supports brain function, improves sexual function in men, and contributes to the healthy sperm production. This is because vitamin B12 is required for the formation and duplication of DNA which, in turn, is responsible for the healthy sperm production. And vitamin B12 deficiency affects genetic material the sperm carries.

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The appropriate dose of yohimbe depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for yohimbe. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

"Sexual relations are not only an important part of people's wellbeing. From a clinical point of view, the inability of some men to perform sexually can also be linked to a range of other health problems, many of which can be debilitating or potentially fatal," says Professor Gary Wittert, Head of the Discipline of Medicine at the University of Adelaide and Director of the University's Freemasons Foundation Centre for Men's Health.
If you’ve been to the health food store lately, you’ve seen shelves lined with vitamins and “organic” supplements, each claiming to boost immunity, revitalize organ function, or “promote health.” And it’s working. Supplements are currently a $30 billion industry in the US, with more than 90,000 products on the market, and vitamin use is on the rise. In fact, a recent survey in Journal of American Medicine Association showed that “52% of US adults reported use of at least 1 supplement product.”
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