3. Men With Bad Lipid Readings.  One study examined men with both erectile dysfunction and "dyslipidemia."  Dyslipidemia is medical speak for bad HDL, LDL, triglyceride or some combination of the three.  They gave these men 1.5 grams of niacin, which is a megadosed amount, and is a favorite of Dr. Davis.  (See my  Review of Track Your Plaque for Dr. Davis' approach to plaque regression.) Besides the above listed benefits, niacin will also a) lower triglycerides, b) boost HDL, c) increase particle size and d) decrease LDL particle counts.  All of these are very anti-atherosclerosis and great for your arteries. 
Antioxidants  boost nitric oxide production and prevent NO breakdown. Ascorbic acid has direct effects on the bioactivity of NO, and augments NO production in a variety of body processes. The effects are actually synergistic with Vitamin E. Both vitamins are not usually measured, and a reasonable dose of Vitamin C is 500 to 1,000 mg daily. Vitamin E supplementation should be limited to <400 IU per day because of potential adverse long-term health effects of higher doses.

The results, published earlier this month, show that the 80 men in the study with moderate or severe erectile dysfunction (ED) and high cholesterol reported an improvement in their ability to maintain an erection after supplementing their diet with niacin. The 80 men who took a placebo pill, who also began the study with only mild ED, did not experience a change in their symptoms, the researchers said.
Consequently, this negatively affects sexual function. Finally, if you frequently suffer from stress, then Vitamin B2 deficiency surely takes place. And the symptoms of this deficiency include peeling lips, cracked lips, stomatitis, tongue inflammation, skin lesions resembling eczema, conjunctivitis, photophobia, lacrimation, and decrement in visual acuity.

1. Increased Blood Flow in Men with Lower Niacin Levels.  Of course, there is a lot to an erection, but I think just about everyone would agree that the #1 goal is to increase something called endothelial function.  The endothelium is the delicate lining of the arteries that pumps out nitric oxide and relaxes the arteries.  And, of course, a relaxed, i.e. more open artery is one that allows more blood to flow into your arm, your leg or your brain.  And I'm sure I don't need to explain why increased blood flow into your penile arteries is critical for erectile strength.
There’s a reason why Casanova developed his reputation: He was alleged to scarf two dozen oysters a day, which is the food highest in zinc. In the modern era, people with higher levels of zinc in their system have been shown to have a higher sex drive than those with lower levels. That’s because the mineral is essential for testosterone production. In one Nutrition study, zinc-deficient men who supplemented with zinc for six months doubled their T levels. And another eight-week trial published results in the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition found that college football players who took a nightly zinc supplement showed increased testosterone levels as well.

Intermountain Healthcare is a Utah-based, not-for-profit system of 23 hospitals, a Medical Group with more than 1,600 physicians and advanced practice clinicians at about 180 clinics, a health plans division called SelectHealth, and other health services. Helping people live the healthiest lives possible, Intermountain is widely recognized as a leader in clinical quality improvement and in efficient healthcare delivery.

Ginseng, specifically “red ginseng,” is known as the “herbal Viagra” that helps puts to rest men’s bedroom woes. Red ginseng is when the root has been steamed and then dried. The ginseng root is the part of the plant that is mostly used as a natural remedy when in its supplement form. However, the plant must be grown for a minimum of five years before it can be used. In a 2008 review, seven studies on red ginseng and ED, ranging in dosages from 600 to 1,000 milligrams three times a day, were found to provide evidence for the effectiveness of the herb in ED treatment.
Yohimbine's powerful effects on blood flow explain why it's been used in traditional African medicine to increase sexual desire in both genders as well as improve the strength of erections in males. [1] Yohimbine's powerful stimulant properties may also benefit athletic performance on and off the field. The body absorbs and expels yohimbine rapidly.
Testosterone levels did not differ statistically in the treatment groups and did not change during treatment with yohimbine. The levels of dehydroepiandrosterone and free testosterone tended to be higher in the responder group, but the levels in both groups were well into the age-adjusted normal ranges. Androgens play a part in peripheral erectile activity, but they are not necessary for the central arousal stimulation of yohimbine,36 in which norepinephrine release acts as an inhibitor antagonist.2 Peripheral sympathetic stimulation also occurs37 but less than its adrenergic antagonistic activity. These peripheral effects are prompting the search for new alpha-2 adrenergic antagonists38

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Adequate daily magnesium intake is slightly lower for younger men than for those in their 30s and older. The University of Maryland Medical Center recommends 400 mg daily for men between the ages of 19 and 30, and 420 mg per day for men 31 and older. While these levels are a good general guideline, you should check with your doctor to determine the proper dosage for a daily magnesium supplement, particularly if you’re using magnesium to help treat or prevent erectile problems.
A 2011 study of 160 men with moderate or severe erectile dysfunction divided the group in two—80 men were given niacin supplements, and 80 a placebo. The group given niacin reported improved ability to “maintain an erection versus the control group.” It’s not exhaustive research, but still promising. The best part about niacin is that it’s naturally found in foods like turkey, avocado, and peanuts (yum). If you’re not a turkey sandwich fan, you can supplement with a vitamin B complex.
medicines called alpha-blockers such as Hytrin (terazosin
HCl), Flomax (tamsulosin HCl), Cardura (doxazosin
mesylate), Minipress (prazosin HCl), Uroxatral (alfuzosin HCl),
 Jalyn (dutasteride and tamsulosin HCl), or Rapaflo (silodosin).
Alpha-blockers are sometimes prescribed for prostate
problems or high blood pressure. In some patients, the use
of Sildenafil with alpha-blockers can lead to a drop in blood pressure or to fainting
Niacin, prescribed for more than 50 years, has been successful in treating all three types of lipids in your bloodstream. It can reduce levels of low-density lipoprotein -- LDL, or “bad,” cholesterol -- and triglycerides, as well as elevate your levels of protective high-density lipoprotein -- HDL, or “good,” cholesterol. But other medications, as well as diet and lifestyle changes, can restore your cholesterol to heart-healthy levels. If you currently take niacin and want to start taking medication to treat erectile dysfunction, ask your doctor about switching to a different type of cholesterol medication.
To evaluate the patients' response clinically in the office, a simple grading system was used.27 The patients were asked about the quality of their erections, which were graded as follows: grade 1, tumescence but no rigidity; grade 2, tumescence with minimal rigidity; grade 3, rigidity sufficient for sexual intercourse; and grade 4, fully rigid erection. At the end of the study, patients were graded as to whether they thought they had improved enough to have satisfactory regular intercourse, which is defined as success in 75% of attempts. The degree of subjective improvement in intercourse was used to classify patients as ‘responders’ vs ‘nonresponders’ in subsequent analyses. A log was kept by the couple of their sexual activity, and it was taken to the clinic for review by the clinical investigator.

This content is strictly the opinion of Dr. Josh Axe and is for informational and educational purposes only. It is not intended to provide medical advice or to take the place of medical advice or treatment from a personal physician. All readers/viewers of this content are advised to consult their doctors or qualified health professionals regarding specific health questions. Neither Dr. Axe nor the publisher of this content takes responsibility for possible health consequences of any person or persons reading or following the information in this educational content. All viewers of this content, especially those taking prescription or over-the-counter medications, should consult their physicians before beginning any nutrition, supplement or lifestyle program.
Dr. Traxler is a University-trained obstetrician/gynecologist, working with patients in Minnesota for over 20 years. She is a professional medical writer; having authored multiple books on pregnancy and childbirth; textbooks and coursework for medical students and other healthcare providers; and has written over 1000 articles on medical, health, and wellness topics.  Dr. Traxler attended the University of Minnesota College of Biological Sciences and University of Minnesota Medical School,  earning a degree in biochemistry with summa cum laude honors in 1981,  and receiving her Medical Doctorate degree (MD) in 1986.

Taking zinc in supplement form is just one of many treatments for those looking for help with ED. Many men use supplements either to replace prescription medications like Viagra and Cialis, or to enhance the effectiveness of these medications. Some other natural supplements aimed at relieving ED symptoms include Korean red ginseng, L-Arginine, carnitine, and DHEA.
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