If you’ve been to the health food store lately, you’ve seen shelves lined with vitamins and “organic” supplements, each claiming to boost immunity, revitalize organ function, or “promote health.” And it’s working. Supplements are currently a $30 billion industry in the US, with more than 90,000 products on the market, and vitamin use is on the rise. In fact, a recent survey in Journal of American Medicine Association showed that “52% of US adults reported use of at least 1 supplement product.”

Three of the randomized studies (25–27) that contributed to the present study data indicated the positive role of both interval and continuous aerobic training in the dual management of both ED and cardiovascular disorders (hypertension and ischemic heart disease ,respectively); this is not surprising because of the arterogenic interrelationship between ED and several cardiovascular disorders. The physiological basis for the therapeutic role of continuous exercise in the management of both ED and some cardiovascular disorders as reported in the present study, could be related to the biochemical, neural and hormonal changes in the blood vessel walls that induce an acute and long-term blood vessel relaxation. The blood vessels might relax after each exercise session because of body warming effects; local production of certain chemicals, such lactic acid and NO; decreases in nerve activity; and changes in certain hormones and their receptors (32, 33). Over time, as the exercise is repeated, there appears to be a growing evidence of a prolonged effect. Thus, chronic (regular, longterm) physical training might reduce basal concentrations of inflammatory markers.
The problem with this though is that there are a lot of websites that are claiming to have a specific exercise technique or perhaps very effective male enhancement products that can guarantee erectile dysfunction. Be careful not to fall for a male enhancement scam. Even though erectile dysfunction may be stressful or difficult to discuss about, there are proven and safe methods that can help you in dealing with it.
The content that appears on this page is presented as an overview vs. comparative marketing. The provided information includes product information, overviews, buying guides, and product specifications. All trademarks, registered trademarks and service-marks mentioned on this site are the property of their respective owners. If something is factually inaccurate please contact us and let us know. By contributing your product facts helps to better serve our readers and the accuracy of the content. 

In the 18th century, Spain embraced the Age of Enlightenment, directing the beacons of thought to all endeavors. But while Spain was not as advanced as France, Britain, Germany, or America, its new political thinking led to the revocation of most of the historical rights and privileges of the sub-kingdoms that comprised the Spanish Crown. Those changes, in turn, allowed for the freedom of inquiry that was so needed for medical discovery, among others.

Much of the evidence shows high rates of vitamin D deficiency in patients with erectile dysfunction. In fact, one study of 3,400 participants found that men with vitamin D deficiency were 32% more likely to have trouble with erections when all other risk factors were controlled for. It’s a little on the nose that you need vitamin D for your “D,” but hey—science can be funny too.
Taking one of these tablets will not automatically produce an erection. Sexual stimulation is needed first to cause the release of nitric oxide from your penile nerves. These medications amplify that signal, allowing some men to function normally. Oral erectile dysfunction medications are not aphrodisiacs, will not cause excitement and are not needed in men who get normal erections.

Zinc therapy (5 mg/day) improves sexual competence by increasing penile thrusting and prolonging ejaculatory latency without disturbing arousability and motivation of male rats. Increase in the T levels observed with zinc supplementation is beneficial in this regard. However, increase in PRL is responsible for the reduced libido index. Further studies on pigs and monkeys are needed to evaluate the possible therapeutic use of zinc in sexual dysfunction.
Carlo Adrian Cañon is a graduate of Bachelor of Secondary Education major in English from Southern Leyte State University-Tomas Oppus in the Philippines. He has written numerous articles on a variety of topics on men’s health, fitness, and product reviews. He is contributing to consumerhealthdigest.com for men sexual health category. You can follow him on: LinkedIn.

L-arginine, or arginine, is an amino acid found in red meat, poultry, fish, and dairy products that helps expand blood vessels and increase blood flow. “The body uses this semi-essential amino acid as the primary building block for nitric oxide,” explains Harry Fisch, M.D., clinical professor of urology and reproductive medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College/New York Presbyterian Hospital.

A mineral involved in muscle development, muscle is essential for reproductive function in men of every age and activity level. One study that compared athletes to non-active individuals found that supplementing with 22 mg magnesium per pound of body weight of the course of four weeks raised testosterone levels in both groups. And two separate studies, one on a group of men over the age of 65 and a second on a younger 18-30-year-old cohort, present the same conclusion: levels of testosterone (and muscle strength) are directly correlated to the levels of magnesium in the body. These are the best foods for magnesium!
Data from the Florida Sexual History Questionnaire collected at each time period (baseline, 5.4 mg tid and 10.8 mg tid) are presented in Table 6. Three patients (two responders and one nonresponder) did not complete the entire questionnaire for each study period and were excluded from the analyses. Thus, data in the table and statistical analyses are based on the responses of seven responders and eight nonresponders.
ED can be caused by a handful of things, but one thing’s for sure: You need a healthy supply of the neurotransmitter nitric oxide (NO) to get and maintain an erection. NO is produced in nerve tissue and helps jolt your Johnson by relaxing the smooth muscle so blood can fill the penis. After the initial release of NO, your body releases a cascade of chemicals—including more of the neurotransmitter—to help keep you hard and happy, according to a study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Some men say certain alternative medicines taken by mouth can help them get and maintain an erection. However, not all “natural” medicines or supplements are safe. Combinations of certain prescribed and alternative medicines could cause major health problems. To help ensure coordinated and safe care, discuss your use of alternative medicines, including use of vitamin and mineral supplements, with a health care professional. Also, never order a medicine online without talking with your doctor.
Shindel, A. W., Xin, Z.-C., Lin, G., Fandel, T. M., Huang, Y.-C., Banie, L., … Lue, T. F. (2010, February 5). Erectogenic and neurotrophic effects of icariin, a purified extract of horny goat weed (Epimedium spp.) in vitro and in vivo. The Journal of Sexual Medicine, 7(4), 1518-1528. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1743-6109.2009.01699.x/full
Yes, niacin is good for erectile dysfunction. Vitamin B3 or Niacin acts as a powerful agent to improve the condition of erectile dysfunction and a research study conducted in a medical center of Hong Kong confirmed that Niacin supplementation has resulted in the increase of blood flow across the pelvic region in men. In addition, researchers have further confirmed that the Vitamin comes with the ability to unclog various harmful fats collected in the artery region.
Much of the evidence shows high rates of vitamin D deficiency in patients with erectile dysfunction. In fact, one study of 3,400 participants found that men with vitamin D deficiency were 32% more likely to have trouble with erections when all other risk factors were controlled for. It’s a little on the nose that you need vitamin D for your “D,” but hey—science can be funny too.
×