If ED continues to be a problem even after making certain lifestyle changes, talk with your doctor. ED is an uncomfortable subject for many men to discuss, but it’s treatable in most cases, so there’s no reason to avoid getting help. Doctors see patients every day about ED, so you’re simply one of millions of men dealing with this common condition.

A 2011 study of 160 men with moderate or severe erectile dysfunction divided the group in two—80 men were given niacin supplements, and 80 a placebo. The group given niacin reported improved ability to “maintain an erection versus the control group.” It’s not exhaustive research, but still promising. The best part about niacin is that it’s naturally found in foods like turkey, avocado, and peanuts (yum). If you’re not a turkey sandwich fan, you can supplement with a vitamin B complex.

Wistar rats (From Medical Research Institute, Colombo) were obtained and kept in a well ventilated animal house under natural dark light cycle (temperature 28-30°C, humidity; 50-55%). Animals were housed in groups (four per group) until they reached sexual maturity (150-200 g). They were provided with pelleted food and water. Male rats were permitted access to receptive females on three separate occasions and then screened for sexual proficiency. Male rats who displayed consistently vigorous sexual activity were selected for the study.


It promotes the formation of red blood cells, enhances cellular metabolism, supports brain function, improves sexual function in men, and contributes to the healthy sperm production. This is because vitamin B12 is required for the formation and duplication of DNA which, in turn, is responsible for the healthy sperm production. And vitamin B12 deficiency affects genetic material the sperm carries.
Penile erection is a hemodynamic process involving increased arterial inflow and restricted venous outflow, coordinated with corpus cavernosum and penile arterial smooth muscle relaxation. Any problem in this mechanism results in Erectile Dysfunction and its etiology is generally multifactorial. This study is aimed at determining the objective outcome of aerobic training in the management of Erectile Dysfunction of arterogenic origin using Meta analysis.
Although not proven, it is likely that erectile dysfunction can be prevented by good general health, paying particular attention to body weight, exercise, and cigarette smoking. For example, heart disease and diabetes are problems that can cause erectile dysfunction, and both are preventable through lifestyle changes such as sensible eating and regular exercise. Furthermore, early diagnosis and treatment of associated conditions like diabetes, hypertension and high cholesterol may prevent or delay erectile dysfunction, or stop the erectile dysfunction from getting more serious.
What it’ll do for you: “Yohimbe dilates the blood vessels and can lower blood pressure,” says Dr. Patrick M. Fratellone, an integrated physician with a practice in Manhattan. “So experts figured, if it can do that, it must give you an erection and treat erectile dysfunction.” Some proponents say that yohimbe extracts are powerful antioxidants that can prevent heart attacks, act as a stimulant and an anti-depressant, and an aid to weight loss. Here, a closer look at the key benefits:
Various hormone levels were monitored during therapy, and it did not appear that there were major changes in the group as a whole (Table 2). Cortisol levels rose significantly from baseline to the first dose of yohimbine. When the hormone levels were evaluated in responders vs nonresponders (Table 3), slight differences were noted. Free testosterone levels were higher at baseline in the responders but did not increase significantly with the higher doses of yohimbine. Dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels were not significantly higher at baseline in the responders, and they did not change with the higher dose of yohimbine. Cortisol levels appeared to increase in both groups with increased doses of yohimbine, significantly more so in responders than in nonresponders (P=0.03).

Yohimbe goes by many names depending on how it’s sold. These include Yohimbehe, Yocon, Yohimex, Johime, Aphrodien and Corynine. Do any yohimbe supplements actually work to help treat sexual problems like impotence, or other conditions? Study results have been somewhat mixed. But there’s some evidence that they may help these conditions. It’s especially helpful when combined with other substances that promote better flow and higher energy levels, such as L-arginine. (3)
Unfortunately, many of the same factors that brought the Italian Renaissance to an end—among them corruption, wars, and a widespread backlash over secularism and indulgence (leading to the “Bonfire of the Vanities”)—also terminated the “rebirth” in Spain. Chasing heresies became a sport that led to the resurrection of the Inquisition, which unlike its prior appearances operated completely under royal authority, rather than the aegis of the church.
Erectile dysfunction can occur as a side effect of medication taken for another health condition. Common culprits are high blood pressure meds, antidepressants, some diuretics, beta-blockers, heart medication, cholesterol meds, antipsychotic drugs, hormone drugs, corticosteroids, chemotherapy, and medication for male pattern baldness, among others.

Suggested intake: “The problem with yohimbine is that you can’t regulate the amount in a dosage,” says Fratellone. “It all depends on what part of the tree it comes from, how it’s cultivated, how it’s exported, and so on. The amount of extract you get will vary.” FDA researchers analyzed a number of over-the-counter yohimbe bark products. They found that the supplements contained only seven percent or less of the amount of yohimbine that would be found in actual yohimbe bark, which suggests that they contained little or no yohimbe. However, the prescription form of yohimbine is strictly regulated by the FDA. It is approved only for the treatment of impotence, and is available in tablets and capsules. For erectile dysfunction, 5.4 to 10 milligrams three times daily has been studied and regarded as generally safe.

Vitamins and minerals are used in systems all over the body. Everywhere from your cardiovascular to your nervous system. It’s a lot to understand. So to help dispel some of the myths and outlandish claims, we’ll take a look at how five common vitamins and nutrients affect one very specific aspect of men’s health—erections. Turns out, vitamins can do more than just ward off the common cold.


Due to its ability to inhibit actions of the sympathetic nervous system, yohimbe can help to bring blood pressure levels back to balance. This is is why it’s used to sometimes increase blood flow, such as to tissues of the reproductive organs.  Or, also why it’s used to treat hypotension (abnormally low blood pressure). It may also be helpful for stimulating nerves and treating fatigue or symptoms of depression.


Because cholesterol is a building block for testosterone, drugs that interfere with cholesterol production can lower levels of this hormone (Journal of Sexual Medicine, April, 2010). French and Dutch researchers have reported that decreased libido and erectile dysfunction may be associated with statin-type drugs (British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, Sept. 2004; Drug Safety, July, 2009).
What if we look at erectile dysfunction as something that can be addressed as a condition other than a “pill for every ill”.   What if we actually look at a nutrient level that directly correlates to a medical condition and follow the science to give a directive on its recommendation?  Well it turns out taking a simple zinc supplement won’t help 100% of the time, but it certainly helps some of the time.
There’s a reason why Casanova developed his reputation: He was alleged to scarf two dozen oysters a day, which is the food highest in zinc. In the modern era, people with higher levels of zinc in their system have been shown to have a higher sex drive than those with lower levels. That’s because the mineral is essential for testosterone production. In one Nutrition study, zinc-deficient men who supplemented with zinc for six months doubled their T levels. And another eight-week trial published results in the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition found that college football players who took a nightly zinc supplement showed increased testosterone levels as well.
There have been some studies to suggest that a placebo effect that improves ED may work for some men. One study found that men taking an oral placebo pill showed as much improvement in ED symptoms as men who took actual medication to improve ED. Conversely, men who were given therapeutic suggestions to improve ED did not see signs of symptom improvement.
In the present study zinc caused an elevation of T. This showed an increase from 2.39 to 8.21 ng/dl after two weeks of zinc treatment. This elevated T level may have contributed to the increase in number of penile thrusting (from 26.5 to 52.8) observed. Supplementation with 459 μmol/day of zinc for three months, in marginally zinc deficient healthy elderly men, has been shown to increase the levels of serum T from 8.3 to 16 ng/dl.[25] Laboratory experiments indicate that the nitric oxide erectile pathway is T dependent.[26] Many studies using animal models have confirmed that T is important in modulating the central and peripheral regulation of erectile dysfunction. T deprivation has a negative impact on the structure of penile tissues and erectile nerves.[27] Thus, elevated T levels subsequent to zinc supplementation may increase the sexual competence via rigid and sustained erection. This may promote greater tactile stimulation of the penis due to increased contact with vagina.[25]
Often when we start to look outside of mainstream medicine for alternative protocols to heal our health issues we replace one pill-taking protocol with another. The prescription drugs are replaced with a long list of supplements. Supplements alone, without any other lifestyle changes, will have some impact, but it will be nowhere near what they can achieve when working in a body supported with a healthy way of life.
If you have symptoms of ED, it’s important to check with your doctor before trying any treatments on your own. This is because ED can be a sign of other health problems. For instance, heart disease or high cholesterol could cause ED symptoms. With a diagnosis, your doctor could recommend a number of steps that would likely improve both your heart health and your ED. These steps include lowering your cholesterol, reducing your weight, or taking medications to unclog your blood vessels.
Antioxidants  boost nitric oxide production and prevent NO breakdown. Ascorbic acid has direct effects on the bioactivity of NO, and augments NO production in a variety of body processes. The effects are actually synergistic with Vitamin E. Both vitamins are not usually measured, and a reasonable dose of Vitamin C is 500 to 1,000 mg daily. Vitamin E supplementation should be limited to <400 IU per day because of potential adverse long-term health effects of higher doses.
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