Zinc therapy (5 mg/day) improves sexual competence by increasing penile thrusting and prolonging ejaculatory latency without disturbing arousability and motivation of male rats. Increase in the T levels observed with zinc supplementation is beneficial in this regard. However, increase in PRL is responsible for the reduced libido index. Further studies on pigs and monkeys are needed to evaluate the possible therapeutic use of zinc in sexual dysfunction.
The improvements in IIEF-erectile function domain (IIEF-EF) score for moderate and severe ED patients in the niacin group were 3.31 and 5.28 and in the placebo group were 2.74 and 2.65, respectively. In the lower range of mild and mild-to-moderate ED, there was no significant improvement in erectile function. Of the 160 patients in the study, 32 were using statins; 18 in the niacin group and 14 in the placebo group. For patients not receiving statin treatment, there was a significant improvement in IIEF-Q3 scores (0.47) for the niacin group, but not for the placebo group. To summarize, niacin alone can improve the erectile function in patients suffering from moderate to severe ED and dyslipidemia.
They found that men who exercised the most were also the most likely to have higher scores in sexual function. Specifically, those who expended 18 METS, or metabolic equivalents, per week were most likely to enjoy sex. METS is a physiological measurement that denotes the amount of energy a person spends on a specific activity, as well as the intensity of it. According to the researchers, 18 METS was equal to about two hours of strenuous exercise like running or swimming, 3.5 hours of moderate-intensity exercise, or six hours of light exercise.   

Many studies have been conducted on this topic; their results have been challenged by lack of controlled groups and non-randomization. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are generally accepted as the most valid method for determining the efficacy of a therapeutic intervention, because the biases associated with other experimental designs can be avoided.Non-randomized controlled trials, can detect associations between an intervention and an outcome. But they cannot rule out the possibility that the association was caused by a third factor linked to both intervention and outcome. Random allocation ensures no systematic differences between intervention groups in factors, known and unknown, that may affect outcome. Randomized controlled trials are the most rigorous way of determining whether a cause-effect relation exists between treatment and outcome and for assessing the cost effectiveness of a treatment (45, 22).
Scientists have found a consistent link between maintaining a healthy weight and avoiding erectile problems. In one Italian study, researchers followed 110 obese men experiencing ED over the course of two years. Of the participants that lost the most weight, 31% ceased to suffer from ED. In the group that lost the least weight, only 5% of the men saw an improvement.
The number of animals ejaculating within 15 minutes was significantly reduced in 5 mg zinc treated group (one out of eight). However, all intromitted rats ejaculated between 20-30 minutes when observation was continued. Ejaculatory latency was significantly high in this group compared to controls; 711.60 Sec (SEM 85.47) vs. 489.50 Sec (SEM 67.66), P < 0.05. Similarly, they showed a significantly higher frequency of penile thrusting compared to controls; 26.50 (SEM 6.17) vs. 52.80 (SEM 11.28), P < 0.05 [Table 1].
Psychosexual Relationship Specialist at End the Problem, Jacqui Olliver is a published author who renews relationships by solving people's emotional and sexual issues. In the past 7 years, she has helped over 1,000 men, women, and couples restore a relaxed, happy, and fulfilling sex life and enhance their overall connection. Click here to check out her programs or to book a complimentary strategy session and start getting real answers to solve the real problems.

There’s much evidence to suggest that Yohimbine does have a positive effect in men who have erectile dysfunction. Initially, it was considered a failure as a treatment because it doesn’t increase levels of testosterone in the body, the hormone needed for erections. However, recent trials have shown that it works well to increase arousal, help blood flow to the penis, and as a general stimulant.

Testosterone levels did not differ statistically in the treatment groups and did not change during treatment with yohimbine. The levels of dehydroepiandrosterone and free testosterone tended to be higher in the responder group, but the levels in both groups were well into the age-adjusted normal ranges. Androgens play a part in peripheral erectile activity, but they are not necessary for the central arousal stimulation of yohimbine,36 in which norepinephrine release acts as an inhibitor antagonist.2 Peripheral sympathetic stimulation also occurs37 but less than its adrenergic antagonistic activity. These peripheral effects are prompting the search for new alpha-2 adrenergic antagonists38
In the human body, folic acid interacts with vitamin B12, pantothenic acid, and vitamin B7 (also called vitamin H or biotin). The signs of biotin deficiency can be hair loss, skin inflammation, skin pallor, mucous membrane inflammation, depression, drowsiness, anemia, blood sugar disorders, muscle pain, poor appetite, nausea, and insomnia. Besides, a person feels tired, irritable and depressed. Consequently, male libido and sexual activity reduce. In turn, this negatively affects sexual performance.
Some medications that are changed by the liver include amitriptyline (Elavil), clozapine (Clozaril), codeine, desipramine (Norpramin), dextromethorphan, donepezil (Aricept), fentanyl (Duragesic), flecainide (Tambocor), fluoxetine (Prozac), meperidine (Demerol), methadone (Dolophine), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL), olanzapine (Zyprexa), ondansetron (Zofran), tramadol (Ultram), trazodone (Desyrel), and others.
Andrew McCullough, MD, associate professor of clinical urology and director, male sexual health program, New York University Langone Medical Center. Lecturer: Auxillium. Research grant: Pfizer. Data safety monitoring board: Pfizer. Consultant: Slate Pharmaceuticals. Clinical trials: Warner Chilcott, Vivus, Lilly, Bayer-GSK, ICOS, Timm, Schering Plough, Aeterna.

Much of the evidence shows high rates of vitamin D deficiency in patients with erectile dysfunction. In fact, one study of 3,400 participants found that men with vitamin D deficiency were 32% more likely to have trouble with erections when all other risk factors were controlled for. It’s a little on the nose that you need vitamin D for your “D,” but hey—science can be funny too.


Andrew McCullough, MD, associate professor of clinical urology and director, male sexual health program, New York University Langone Medical Center. Lecturer: Auxillium. Research grant: Pfizer. Data safety monitoring board: Pfizer. Consultant: Slate Pharmaceuticals. Clinical trials: Warner Chilcott, Vivus, Lilly, Bayer-GSK, ICOS, Timm, Schering Plough, Aeterna.
Vitamin C has been associated with higher sperm counts. You can get it naturally from strawberries, raspberries and blueberries, which are anthocyanins, colorful plant chemicals which help keep your arteries unclogged, boosting circulation and erection quality. In supplement stores, you’ll find all manner of megadoses — steer clear of those; they might do more harm than good.
Dr. Niket Sonpal is the Associate Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency at Brookdale Hospital Medical Center in Brooklyn and an Associate Professor at Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine. He's a practicing Gastroenterologist and Hepatologist with a focus on Men's and Women's Health, and a regular contributor to Women's health, Shape and Prevention Magazine.
Selenium, found in Brazil nuts, liver and oysters, is a trace mineral that plays an important role in hormone health. You only need a tiny bit for healthy sperm, but a tiny deficiency can be catastrophic for reproductive health. In one study, men who had lower testosterone and were infertile also had significantly lower selenium levels than the fertile group. Supplementing with the mineral improved chances of successful conception by 56 percent. And a second British Journal of Urology study that included 69 infertile men with low levels of the mineral, found selenium supplementation could significantly improve sub-par sperm motility associated with testosterone deficiency. Check out these 7 Testosterone-Boosting Foods!
This mineral is needed for a healthy sex life and a deficiency is linked to low testosterone levels which contributes to weaker erections. Zinc supplements can significantly improve matters in the bedroom. Food items loaded with Zinc can include oysters, shellfish, nuts and seeds. Erectile dysfunction and loss of interest in sex life can be caused by many physical and psychological reasons. Keep yourself healthy by consuming these vitamins and a healthy diet that is high in fibre and nutrients. Try to ignore OTC medicines like I-Arginine and other pills, and start including these fresh vegetables, apples, oats and whole grains in your daily life. 
The main surgical treatment of ED involves insertion of a penile implant (also called penile prostheses). Because penile vascular surgery is not recommended for aging males who have failed oral PDE5 inhibitors, ICI or IU therapies, implants are the next step for these patients. Although placement of a penile implant is a surgery which carries risks, they have the highest rates of success and satisfaction among ED treatment options.
When given orally, yohimbine reaches peak levels in 10–15 min, and the half-life is 0.6 h. The efficacy of yohimbine in sexual function has been questioned, perhaps because of early questionable multidrug preparations.10,11 Yohimbine has been shown to have some effect on psychologic erectile dysfunction12,13 and in reversing fluoxetine-induced sexual dysfunction.14
This African tree bark extract sends blood flow to the genitals, said herbalist Ed Smith, a founding member of the American Herbalists Guild, who adds a warning that Yohimbe can cause nervousness and raise already-existing high blood pressure (so avoid taking it if you have heart or kidney disease), and can also negatively interact with antidepressants.
Several studies have shown that erectile dysfunction is somehow linked to problems with cardiovascular health — which one comes first has been the question. It makes sense; the penis becomes erect through a complex system of blood vessels and spongy tissue called the corpora cavernosa — this is where the blood gets trapped, causing the erection. When problems arise through this system, whether they’re caused in the brain or through problems with the blood vessels, the penis can’t get erect.

It’s hard to concentrate on what’s happening in the bedroom when you’re thinking about problems at work. For many men, it’s psychological issues like anxiety rather than physical ones that contribute to E.D. Chronic stress has also been linked to heart disease, high blood pressure, depression, and more. Find a way of blowing off steam that works for you (I like exercise and meditation) and stick to it.


A variety of personal habits and lifestyle choices have been linked to ED. In some ways, this is a good thing, since habits can be broken and choices reconsidered. What's more, many of the lifestyle factors that contribute to sexual problems are ones that affect overall health and well-being, both physical and mental. Addressing these factors, therefore, can have benefits beyond improving erectile dysfunction.
Clinical trials were included if they met all of the following inclusion criteria: study population defined; Men with arteriogenic ED were considered; the present review was concerned with studies that used aerobic exercise on ED; only randomized controlled trials on this topic were selected for review; The main outcome measure was satisfactory intercourse without additional therapy using the International Index of Erectile Dysfunction (IIED) scores. The present review utilized studies that had successfully undergone rigorous peer review (i.e., published peerreviewed journals), were included.
Erectile dysfunction obviously can be frustrating, but it can also be an important warning sign of potential heart disease risk. Once you rule that out, there are natural things you can do to improve it. For more information on how to take control of ED, contact Tack180 for a free consultation. Our experts in nutrition, stress management, behavioral psychology, and fitness go beyond the usual counsel to address your particular vulnerabilities.
DHEA. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is a hormone produced in your body’s adrenal gland that aids in the production of testosterone and other hormones. Since testosterone is critical for healthy male sexuality, supplementing with DHEA may help with issues like sluggish libido and impotence. One double-blind, placebo-controlled study found subjects given 50 milligrams of DHEA every day for six months experienced improvement in symptoms of E.D.
Several studies have shown that erectile dysfunction is somehow linked to problems with cardiovascular health — which one comes first has been the question. It makes sense; the penis becomes erect through a complex system of blood vessels and spongy tissue called the corpora cavernosa — this is where the blood gets trapped, causing the erection. When problems arise through this system, whether they’re caused in the brain or through problems with the blood vessels, the penis can’t get erect.
ED can be caused by a handful of things, but one thing’s for sure: You need a healthy supply of the neurotransmitter nitric oxide (NO) to get and maintain an erection. NO is produced in nerve tissue and helps jolt your Johnson by relaxing the smooth muscle so blood can fill the penis. After the initial release of NO, your body releases a cascade of chemicals—including more of the neurotransmitter—to help keep you hard and happy, according to a study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

However, for most men who experience erectile dysfunction, their overall experience can be improved even further through regular exercise. There are many reasons why exercise improves sexual satisfaction. For one thing, regular, sustained exercise can lead to the release of chemicals called endorphins that are responsible for the so-called runner’s high, and which stimulate the release of sex hormones. Exercise also generally improves mood and imparts a sense of calm afterward, with lower heart rate, lower blood pressure, better digestion, and lower levels of stress hormones.
Psychosexual Relationship Specialist at End the Problem, Jacqui Olliver is a published author who renews relationships by solving people's emotional and sexual issues. In the past 7 years, she has helped over 1,000 men, women, and couples restore a relaxed, happy, and fulfilling sex life and enhance their overall connection. Click here to check out her programs or to book a complimentary strategy session and start getting real answers to solve the real problems.
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Low-intensity extracorporeal shock wave therapy has been proposed as a new non-invasive treatment for erectile dysfunction caused by problems with blood vessels. Shock wave therapy machines are now available in some medical practices in Australia. Although there is some evidence that it may help a proportion of men with erectile dysfunction, more research is needed before clear recommendations on its use can be made.
Prostate problems are most common in older men, but it’s never too early to start looking after your prostate! Problems such as BPH (enlarged prostate) and prostatitis can cause unpleasant symptoms such as frequent urination, weak urine stream, difficulty urinating and sudden urges to urinate, which can really get in the way of daily life and interrupt sleep.
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