Erectile problems can sometimes be linked to cardiovascular issues. If your heart isn't in full health, your sex life maybe suffering as result. Men who suffer with moderate to severe erection problems have significantly lower levels of folic acid than guys without the issue. The B vitamin has been shown to work with nitric oxide which would explain why an absence of it would lead to problems in the manhood. This seems to help with erectile dysfunction more than some medications. Treatment with folic acid resulted in men having an increase in their erectile strength.
Besides, niacin’s beneficial effects became more evident when the Hong Kong study researchers excluded those already using statin therapy. If there is an overlapping effect of these two groups of lipid-lowering agents on endothelial function, this would make sense. Also, chronic statin use could lessen the effect of niacin on endothelial function and hence affect improvement in erectile function.
Energy-boosting goji berries have been used for thousands of years in Chinese medicine to help increase energy and enhance the release of hormones.”Goji is also beneficial for increasing blood flow, which helps to oxygenate all of the cells and tissues of the body, including the sex organs,” says celebrity nutritionist Dr. Lindsey Duncan. “Which increases libido—that’s why they call goji the ‘Viagra of China.'”

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Several studies (15–17) have shown an inverse relationship between physical activity levels and biomarkers of inflammation in both the healthy individuals and subjects with cardiovascular condition. Studies (18–21) have also reported the role of exercise in the management of erectile dysfunction. The majority of these studies are subjective, retrospective case series and non randomized non controlled studies. However, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are generally accepted as the most valid method for determining the efficacy of a therapeutic intervention, because the biases associated with other experimental designs can be avoided (22). Therefore, the purpose of the present Meta analysis study was to determine the role and effect of aerobic exercise in the management of erectile dysfunction in randomized controlled trials.
The following parameters were computed using the observed behavioral measures. Copulatory efficiency (proportion of mounts resulting in vaginal penetration relative to the total number of mounts), intromission ratio (number of intromissions/number of intromissions + number of mounts) and intercopulatory intervals (average time between intromissions).[8]
We have presented objective evidence that yohimbine has a positive effect in men with organic erectile dysfunction. This is contrary to the blanket statement of the American Urological Association in their clinical guidelines for erectile dysfunction, which states: ‘Based on the data to date, yohimbine does not appear to be effective for erectile dysfunction and, thus, it should not be recommended as treatment for the standard patient.’17 Our data strongly suggest that yohimbine treatment should be revisited. Our study was observational with dose-escalation just to see if there was any rationale to expect any effect in men with organic erectile dysfunction, especially in men who do not have the risk factor of tobacco abuse. The next step would be a double-blind, placebo-controlled study using yohimbine in smokers vs non-smokers to verify the current observation. We believe that our data justify such a trial. Yohimbine will never be a first-line drug for erectile dysfunction, but may be useful in subsets of men with mild disease or few risk factors. Yohimbine might also be useful in combination therapy with other treatment modalities such as sildenafil and intraurethral alprostadil, when they do not produce adequate effects alone, as has already been shown with naloxone39 or trazedone.40
These results are remarkable, because it appears that not only can niacin improve short term erectile function in many men, but also can likely help to reverse arterial plaque if a comprehensive program is undertaken.  Of course, neither I nor anyone else knows how safe megadosed niacin is long term, but many experts consider it safe when used under the care of a knowledgeable physician.  You'll have to do your own due diligence.
So, in establishing physiology, pharmacology, clinical results and safety, zinc is a good choice when you look at cost and side effect profile as well as ease of availability and interaction profile with other meds and other medical conditions.  Having said all of this, there is no bulletproof evidence out there guaranteeing that increasing your zinc consumption either in food or via a supplement will improve ED or increase libido.  Even if a patient experiences an increase in testosterone from such a supplementation, this is not a certain gateway to resolution of theses symptoms as there is more to it than just one hormone level.  However for those that are experiencing problems in these areas, it is certainly worth a try for them.  The patient should be mindful however that supplements should be treated like any other medication and trying to increase your testosterone shouldn’t be done without consultation with your doctor and pharmacist.  You should also check for any interactions with any meds or medical conditions before trying any supplement as well.
Andrew McCullough, MD, associate professor of clinical urology and director, male sexual health program, New York University Langone Medical Center. Lecturer: Auxillium. Research grant: Pfizer. Data safety monitoring board: Pfizer. Consultant: Slate Pharmaceuticals. Clinical trials: Warner Chilcott, Vivus, Lilly, Bayer-GSK, ICOS, Timm, Schering Plough, Aeterna.

When men are given supplemental testosterone it can have positive effects on erectile dysfunction as well as the “grumpy old men” syndrome of low energy, loss of drive, low libido, and loss of endurance as well as “man boobs”.  Zinc has a direct effect on the two main enzyme systems that act on testosterone: conversion of testosterone to estrogen via aromatase and the conversion of testosterone to DHT by 5 alpha reductase.   Zinc blocks the testosterone to estrogen pathway leading to more testosterone.  It turns out that only at really high zinc levels does zinc inhibit the 5 alpha reductase enzyme so when we give mild to moderate zinc supplements, DHT actually increases because there is more testosterone to feed into this pathway.   This actually benefits things because DHT has 2-3 times the times the androgen receptor affinity than testosterone.  In any case, we see an increase of testosterone and androgenic activity from DHT with zinc supplements and whether a guy has low or normal T to begin with, there is a positive change in erectile dysfunction and libido in some men due to the increased androgenic activity and less estrogen pulling in the opposite direction.  Conversely we see testosterone levels drop when a diet is low in Zinc as well as a drop in DHT.  It is important to note that this effect of increased testosterone with zinc supplementation, while well established, does not always lead to an improvement of ED and increased Libido.


How it works: Rhodiola works in supporting our adrenal glands by preventing the breakdown of too much dopamine and serotonin during stressful times, leaving enough for us to remain buoyant and energized. What’s extra fun about Rhodiola is that it works fast – in 30 minutes – to change your energy levels and focus – so pop one before you think you want to get frisky.
However, the case is entirely different for Niacin, as it is not only relatively more convenient, but also it allows men to enjoy sex any time when they want even when they take Niacin for only one time in a day for erectile dysfunction. Niacin formulates in the form of various slow-release pills designed primarily to seep in a slow way within the human bloodstream during the course of one day.
As we mentioned before, there are a lot of treatment options that you could use to treat a condition as erectile dysfunction. A lot of the men diagnosed with erectile dysfunction decide to try some of the natural remedies before they refer to some of the top men enhancement pills. Exercise is one of the most commonly recommended ways as a natural remedy for erectile dysfunction. We all know that exercising has a lot of different beneficial effects on our bodies so why not use it as a part of the treatment for this condition? 
Cavallini, G., Modenini, F., Vitali, G., & Koverech, A. (2005, November). Acetyl-L-carnitine plus propionyl-L-carnitine improve efficacy of sildenafil in treatment of erectile dysfunction after bilateral nerve-sparing radical retropubic prostatectomy. Urology, 66(5), 1080-5. Retrieved from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0090429505006515

Lifestyle changes like getting more exercise and adjusting your diet can help. In a study of obese men with E.D. who restricted calories for two years and were advised to be more active, participants not only lost weight but also experienced decreased severity of their E.D. Research also shows aerobic exercise can significantly lower your risk of erectile dysfunction thanks to its ability to boost blood flow and circulation. Eating certain foods can also reduce incidence of E.D.
If you’ve been to the health food store lately, you’ve seen shelves lined with vitamins and “organic” supplements, each claiming to boost immunity, revitalize organ function, or “promote health.” And it’s working. Supplements are currently a $30 billion industry in the US, with more than 90,000 products on the market, and vitamin use is on the rise. In fact, a recent survey in Journal of American Medicine Association showed that “52% of US adults reported use of at least 1 supplement product.”
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