Men, aged 40–80 y, were recruited from new consultations seen for erectile dysfunction at the Lahey Clinic Center for Sexual Function. Patients were screened by history and physical examination and by evaluation of nocturnal penile tumescence and rigidity with the RigiScan™ (Timm Medical Technologies, Inc., Minneapolis, USA). Candidates completed a sexual questionnaire and had morning blood tests for luteinizing hormone (LH), free testosterone, cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and androstenedione. Inclusion criteria included normal initial serum testosterone and prolactin levels and the presence of an organic cause of erectile dysfunction manifested by abnormal nocturnal tumescence and rigidity testing with the RigiScan™ monitor. Active smokers and men with concurrent major psychiatric problems were excluded. No other treatment for erectile dysfunction was permitted during the study. Yohimbine hydrochloride (supplied by Palisades Pharmaceuticals, Palisades, NJ, USA) was started at a dose of 5.4 mg three times a day (tid) for 4 weeks, after which the sex questionnaire was administered again and blood tests, nocturnal penile tumescence and rigidity testing were repeated. The dose of yohimbine then was increased to 10.8 mg tid for 4 additional weeks followed by a third administration of the sex questionnaire and final measurements of hormone levels and nocturnal penile tumescence and rigidity monitoring.
There are two things that need to be looked at in recommending a supplement for a medical condition: what is the physiology of the medical condition and what is the pharmacology of the supplement you are using.  There then is a search for a link between the two that leads to a tie in with a therapeutic approach.  In some ways this is like a logic course that says A causes B, B causes C therefor A causes C.  We then must apply this to the scientific method and finally the ultimate test: clinical response and safety.  This is often made out to be the gold standard for our typical Rx meds that I dispense every day, but often ridiculed when it crosses the barbed wired “nutraceutical” boarder.  If it is a nutrient then we must be getting the right amount in our food after all right?  Regardless of 1)what the real amount is in the food we eat, not to mention 2)the depletion that may be taking place of that nutrient due to a prescription drug we are taking (an absolute science based cause and effect) – we blindly accept what our food has in it and the level our bodies maintain – this is an incorrect assumption.  In fact it is quite ironic that the anti-nutraceutical court is still hanging onto this assumption when both are established by science.
That’s no joke. Like every part of the body, the male repro system needs the right nutrients for optimal health, from function to fertility. Studies have isolated several nutrients that are particularly beneficial. You can get them through these best foods for your penis, or these best proteins for your penis, but we’ve broken them down here by nutrient in case you want to ensure you’re getting enough. (And if you do decide to go the supplement route, as always, talk to your doctor and never exceed recommended dosages.)
After two hours of zinc treatment, male rats were individually caged and kept for 15 minutes for adaptation. One estrous (receptive) and one diestrous (nonreceptive) female were introduced to each cage and the duration of physical contact with each female was recorded for 15 minutes. Partner preference index (PPI) was calculated as the difference between the time spent with estrous female and diestrous female. Positive indices indicate their positive sexual interest.[12]

They found that men who exercised the most were also the most likely to have higher scores in sexual function. Specifically, those who expended 18 METS, or metabolic equivalents, per week were most likely to enjoy sex. METS is a physiological measurement that denotes the amount of energy a person spends on a specific activity, as well as the intensity of it. According to the researchers, 18 METS was equal to about two hours of strenuous exercise like running or swimming, 3.5 hours of moderate-intensity exercise, or six hours of light exercise.   
E.D. may just be that early warning sign. Erections depend on blood flow, and blood flow depends on nice, wide-open arteries. Atherosclerosis doesn’t just affect the arteries around your heart; if you have plaque build-up, you are likely to have it all around the arterial system — and the penile artery is one of the smallest arteries you have (no matter what you claim about your size). So if you have atherosclerosis, then the plaque there will be one of the first places where you would notice a decline in blood flow.

One of the main actions of yohimbe bark is alpha-2 antagonism (this is why it’s also sometimes called an “alpha-2 blocker”). This means that it can impact sympathetic nervous system activity and increase the release of adrenaline (or noradrenaline). This is because it blocks alpha-2 receptors in the brain stem. (4) Other types of alpha-2 agonists medications work in a similar way. They affect the central nervous system by altering release of certain neurotransmitters and dilating blood vessels. This increases alertness, circulation and other physiological processes.
Move a muscle, but we're not talking about your biceps. A strong pelvic floor enhances rigidity during erections and helps keep blood from leaving the penis by pressing on a key vein. In a British trial, three months of twice-daily sets of Kegel exercises (which strengthen these muscles), combined with biofeedback and advice on lifestyle changes — quitting smoking, losing weight, limiting alcohol — worked far better than just advice on lifestyle changes.
Yohimbe bark (pronounced yoh-heem-buh) is an herbal supplement associated with anti-aging effects. It is used to naturally treat erectile dysfunction, low libido, hormonal imbalances and symptoms like low energy. Yohimbe has a long history of use in Western Africa, where the plant originates. It’s still grown there today, especially for its apparent aphrodisiac abilities.
Zinc distributes all over the body, so it’s difficult to test through a blood test. If you have problems with erectile dysfunction or suspect that you might have a zinc deficiency, talk with your doctor. A medical professional will be able to check your testosterone level and determine if using zinc supplements to treat your ED is an appropriate course of action.
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