Niacin -- with or without the addition of drugs to treat impotence -- poses serious health risks, including stomach ulcers and liver damage. If you have Type 2 diabetes, taking niacin could cause drastic elevations in your blood sugar levels. Less serious side effects include stomach upset and skin flushes -- your face and chest turn red and your skin itches, tingles or burns. You can purchase niacin without a prescription, but some over-the-counter formulas -- no-flush varieties that contain niacinamide -- will unlikely help lower your cholesterol.
A study published in The American Journal of Cardiology confirmed that aerobic exercises will help you to cure your erectile dysfunction. Erectile dysfunction is most commonly caused by obesity, hypertension, and diabetes, which decrease the blood flow in the penis. Aerobic exercises can and will help you to improve your health in general, improve your blood flow, and ultimately treat your condition.
If you’ve been to the health food store lately, you’ve seen shelves lined with vitamins and “organic” supplements, each claiming to boost immunity, revitalize organ function, or “promote health.” And it’s working. Supplements are currently a $30 billion industry in the US, with more than 90,000 products on the market, and vitamin use is on the rise. In fact, a recent survey in Journal of American Medicine Association showed that “52% of US adults reported use of at least 1 supplement product.”
Twenty-one men were screened. Two were rejected because they had normal results on nocturnal penile study, and one man was excluded from the study because of a protocol violation. Eighteen men completed the study. The mean age of the men was 60.2 y (range, 34–69 y). The mean duration of erectile dysfunction was 3.1 y (range, 1–10 y). All men were in stable heterosexual relationships. The listed medical risk factors for erectile dysfunction were hypertension in nine men, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in seven, single offending medication in seven (mostly beta-blockers), multiple medications in five, diabetes mellitus in four (one with neuropathy), venous leakage in two, and peripheral vascular insufficiency in one.
Having your current medication checked – if you are taking medication already, it could be that your erection problems are a side effect. Have a doctor check whether this is the cause of your problems and if it is, you might be able to switch medications and then find that your erectile dysfunction goes away completely – or at least improves. Medications that can cause erection problems include:

In the analysis of the study, the niacin group showed a significant increase in both IIEF-Q3 scores and IIEF-Q4 scores compared to the initial baseline values. While the placebo group also showed a significant increase in IIEF-Q3 scores (high hopes, no doubt), it did not for IIEF-Q4 scores. In other words, the “placebo effect” did not extend to maintaining erections. Also, when patients were stratified according to the baseline severity of ED, the patients with moderate and severe ED who received niacin showed a significant improvement in IIEF-Q3 scores (0.56 and 1.03, respectively) and IIEF-Q4 scores (0.56 and 0.84, respectively) compared with baseline values. These results were not significantly increased for the placebo group.


In fact, one common reason many younger men visit their doctor is to get erectile dysfunction medication. Often, men with erectile dysfunction suffer with diabetes or heart disease, or may be sedentary or obese, but they don’t realize the impact of these health conditions on sexual function. Along with erectile dysfunction treatment, the doctor may recommend managing the illness, being more physically active, or losing weight.

I am so grateful Jacqui, I am seeing my girlfriend tomorrow and feel like the problem is pretty much gone! I can't believe it I thought I was broken!!! I have searched on sooo many sites and got so much bad advice and feel like posting the link of your site on all of those others. As this is a horrible problem and your method will work for me - so guys need to know this! Many, many thanks for the help.
The group treated with the lower concentration of zinc (1 mg/day) did not show an alteration in any of the observed parameters. However, supplementation with a dose of 5 mg/day per rat caused substantial prolonged ejaculatory latency and increased in number of penile thrusting. The other parameters studied remained unchanged indicating uninterrupted libido, sex vigor and performance. Majority of male rats (75 %) showed the prominent actions of sexual behaviour (mount, intromission and penile thrusting) and did not ejaculate within the 15-minute observation period.
Some studies suggest that alpha 2-antagonists may help improve patients’ response to antidepressant medications. (5) Yohimbe has a chemical structure that is similar to several medications, and even recreational drugs, that are used to manage conditions like like mood-related disorders such as depression or schizophrenia, low libido, dizziness due to low blood pressure, and others. One such medication is called Reserpine, a type of indole alkaloid that is prescribed as an antipsychotic and antihypertensive drug. Another is lysergic acid (also known as LSD), which has much stronger psychological/psychedelic effects. While yohimbine doesn’t actually have psychedelic effects, according to research findings, it impacts neurotransmitters including dopamine, adrenaline and serotonin. It also seems to help some people suffering from symptoms due to mental illness.

Various hormone levels were monitored during therapy, and it did not appear that there were major changes in the group as a whole (Table 2). Cortisol levels rose significantly from baseline to the first dose of yohimbine. When the hormone levels were evaluated in responders vs nonresponders (Table 3), slight differences were noted. Free testosterone levels were higher at baseline in the responders but did not increase significantly with the higher doses of yohimbine. Dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels were not significantly higher at baseline in the responders, and they did not change with the higher dose of yohimbine. Cortisol levels appeared to increase in both groups with increased doses of yohimbine, significantly more so in responders than in nonresponders (P=0.03).


This African tree bark extract sends blood flow to the genitals, said herbalist Ed Smith, a founding member of the American Herbalists Guild, who adds a warning that Yohimbe can cause nervousness and raise already-existing high blood pressure (so avoid taking it if you have heart or kidney disease), and can also negatively interact with antidepressants.
It’s traditionally used by Pygmies and Bushmen as an aphrodisiac and stimulant. In the 19th century, German missionaries brought this herbal plant to Europe, where it became known as the “love tree.” The extract of this herb is clear and odorless with a bitter taste, and is traditionally prepared and consumed as a tea. Nowadays, medicines and supplements that contain yohimbe bark are available in capsule and tablet form.
Yohimbe is commonly taken to increase sexual excitement and to reduce sexual problems such as symptoms of erectile dysfunction (ED), also called impotence. Research shows that yohimbe may be capable of increasing blood flow to the penis or vagina. It also increases nerve impulses that play a role in orgasm. Due to how yohimbine affects blood vessels, it can cause relaxation of the penile tissue and engorgement of blood. This helps a man to maintain an erection. These effects are beneficial for both sexes when it comes to experiencing sexual satisfaction.
These are not currently approved by the FDA for ED management, but they may be offered through research studies (clinical trials). Patients who are interested should discuss the risks and benefits (informed consent) of each, as well as costs before starting any clinical trials. Most therapies not approved by the FDA are not covered by government or private insurance benefits.
For many men, stopping smoking is an erectile dysfunction remedy, particularly when ED is the result of vascular disease, which occurs when blood supply to the penis becomes restricted because of blockage or narrowing of the arteries. Smoking and even smokeless tobacco can also cause the narrowing of important blood vessels and have the same negative impact. 

Twenty-one men were screened. Two were rejected because they had normal results on nocturnal penile study, and one man was excluded from the study because of a protocol violation. Eighteen men completed the study. The mean age of the men was 60.2 y (range, 34–69 y). The mean duration of erectile dysfunction was 3.1 y (range, 1–10 y). All men were in stable heterosexual relationships. The listed medical risk factors for erectile dysfunction were hypertension in nine men, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in seven, single offending medication in seven (mostly beta-blockers), multiple medications in five, diabetes mellitus in four (one with neuropathy), venous leakage in two, and peripheral vascular insufficiency in one.
This content is strictly the opinion of Dr. Josh Axe and is for informational and educational purposes only. It is not intended to provide medical advice or to take the place of medical advice or treatment from a personal physician. All readers/viewers of this content are advised to consult their doctors or qualified health professionals regarding specific health questions. Neither Dr. Axe nor the publisher of this content takes responsibility for possible health consequences of any person or persons reading or following the information in this educational content. All viewers of this content, especially those taking prescription or over-the-counter medications, should consult their physicians before beginning any nutrition, supplement or lifestyle program.
Besides, niacin’s beneficial effects became more evident when the Hong Kong study researchers excluded those already using statin therapy. If there is an overlapping effect of these two groups of lipid-lowering agents on endothelial function, this would make sense. Also, chronic statin use could lessen the effect of niacin on endothelial function and hence affect improvement in erectile function.
Researchers found that this compound, delivering 6mg of yohimbine HCL and 3.25g of L-arginine, significantly improved erectile function in those with mild-to-moderate ED. [15] L-arginine is an amino acid that acts as a precursor to and plays a critical role in nitric oxide production. Yohimbine paired with a compound encouraging nitric oxide production may be the perfect combination for significantly decreasing or eliminating symptoms of erectile dysfunction.
Taking one of these tablets will not automatically produce an erection. Sexual stimulation is needed first to cause the release of nitric oxide from your penile nerves. These medications amplify that signal, allowing some men to function normally. Oral erectile dysfunction medications are not aphrodisiacs, will not cause excitement and are not needed in men who get normal erections.
A noticing fact is that each of these men had problems of lipid levels and high levels of cholesterol. According to the author Dr. Chi-Fai in Hong Kong, "Niacin or Vitamin B3 is one among the old erectile dysfunction drugs and medical experts have documented its safety in well manner. Because of this, we should consider it as a simple and an easy way to bring improvements in the men's erectile function."
Also to be considered, patients were not using PDE5 inhibitors during the study period. Therefore it wasn’t determined whether the combined use with niacin can enhance the response of PDE5 inhibitors. Another limitation on the study results was the exclusion of the partner’s assessments. This would help to provide a more comprehensive assessment of the efficacy of niacin.
So, in establishing physiology, pharmacology, clinical results and safety, zinc is a good choice when you look at cost and side effect profile as well as ease of availability and interaction profile with other meds and other medical conditions.  Having said all of this, there is no bulletproof evidence out there guaranteeing that increasing your zinc consumption either in food or via a supplement will improve ED or increase libido.  Even if a patient experiences an increase in testosterone from such a supplementation, this is not a certain gateway to resolution of theses symptoms as there is more to it than just one hormone level.  However for those that are experiencing problems in these areas, it is certainly worth a try for them.  The patient should be mindful however that supplements should be treated like any other medication and trying to increase your testosterone shouldn’t be done without consultation with your doctor and pharmacist.  You should also check for any interactions with any meds or medical conditions before trying any supplement as well.
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Shape up. ED is often linked with restricted blood flow to the penis. Keep your heart and arteries in good condition by maintaining a healthy weight, and following a diet high in fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Avoid saturated fats and trans-fats. Regular aerobic exercise can improve blood flow to the genitals and reduce the stress that can contribute to ED.


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Erectile dysfunction can occur as a side effect of medication taken for another health condition. Common culprits are high blood pressure meds, antidepressants, some diuretics, beta-blockers, heart medication, cholesterol meds, antipsychotic drugs, hormone drugs, corticosteroids, chemotherapy, and medication for male pattern baldness, among others.
Once you get checked out for artery blockage and low T, there are things you can do to help treat ED besides taking medications. Yes, Viagra is now available generically (it’s called sildenafil), but it is still expensive, and many men experience side effects, like heart palpitations or blue-ish vision. Here are a few proven natural ways to help improve E.D.
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