Kegel exercises benefits a lot of men. In particular, they also help in strengthening the bulbocavernosus muscle. This very important muscle performs three types of roles. One it allows the penis to grow and be engorged with blood during erection. Second, it pumps while ejaculation, and third, it helps in emptying the urethra right after urination.

A study published in the journal Fertility and Sterility that analyzed the effect of various fruit and vegetables on sperm quality discovered carrots had the best all-around results on sperm count and motility—a term used to describe the ability of sperm to swim towards an egg. Men who ate the most carrots saw improved sperm performance by 6.5 to 8 percent. The Harvard researchers attribute the boost to carotenoids, powerful antioxidative compounds in carrots that help the body make vitamin A.
It’s easy to see how erectile dysfunction subsides with exercise. Not only does it help reduce cardiovascular risk factors, but it’s also been shown to reduce stress, another cause of the condition. The best part is that it doesn’t take much effort to get started on an exercise routine. “When it comes to exercise, there is no one-size-fits-all approach,” co-author Dr. Stephen Freedland said in the release. “However, we are confident that even some degree of exercise, even if it’s less intense, is better than no exercise at all.”
When men are given supplemental testosterone it can have positive effects on erectile dysfunction as well as the “grumpy old men” syndrome of low energy, loss of drive, low libido, and loss of endurance as well as “man boobs”.  Zinc has a direct effect on the two main enzyme systems that act on testosterone: conversion of testosterone to estrogen via aromatase and the conversion of testosterone to DHT by 5 alpha reductase.   Zinc blocks the testosterone to estrogen pathway leading to more testosterone.  It turns out that only at really high zinc levels does zinc inhibit the 5 alpha reductase enzyme so when we give mild to moderate zinc supplements, DHT actually increases because there is more testosterone to feed into this pathway.   This actually benefits things because DHT has 2-3 times the times the androgen receptor affinity than testosterone.  In any case, we see an increase of testosterone and androgenic activity from DHT with zinc supplements and whether a guy has low or normal T to begin with, there is a positive change in erectile dysfunction and libido in some men due to the increased androgenic activity and less estrogen pulling in the opposite direction.  Conversely we see testosterone levels drop when a diet is low in Zinc as well as a drop in DHT.  It is important to note that this effect of increased testosterone with zinc supplementation, while well established, does not always lead to an improvement of ED and increased Libido.
Two years ago I took regular Niacine for about a year to lower LDL and increase HDL. I did not want to take Statins because of its side effects. I was being monitored by my Dr. because of the effect on liver enzymes. I took 1.5 gr together with Phytosterols. The treatment was effective and the only side effect were the flushes which I found could be eliminated by having 500 mg at the end of each of the 3 main meals. I stopped treatment for a year or so, but now the Dr. suggested I start taking Niacine. or Statins. I chose Niacine (Nicotine Acid) and started with 500 mgs for 3 days; increased it to 1000 mgs. for 4 more days, until I increased it to 500 mgs x 3 for a total of 1.5 grms/day taking 500 mgms/meal. I started noticing my gradual decrease in libido this time almost inmediately. I do not take any other medicines as such I'm definitely inclined to blame Niacine because I have taken Phytosterols for 3 years and my libido was fine. I'm a senior. Hope this will help!

Over the years, myriad treatments and gadgets have been invented to assist with issues related to erections. They run the gamut from vacuum pumps to constriction bands, surgical implants, male hormone therapy, herbal supplements (ginkgo biloba, saw palmetto,  L- arginine, and yohimbe), and even shock-wave therapy. Lifestyle changes include: increasing exercise, decrease smoking, losing weight, and eating healthier. More natural alternative treatments include acupuncture and watermelon juice. In her hilarious and informative book entitled Bonk, researcher Mary Roach explores coupling of science and sex, and dedicates a couple of chapters to in-depth analysis of erectile dysfunction treatments.

Participants in this study gradually increased their daily intake of niacin from 250 mg to 3,000 mg over 36 weeks. Nine of the 23 people who were taking immediate-release niacin withdrew from the study early because of facial flushing, fatigue, or skin discoloration. Eighteen of the 23 who were taking 3,000 mg daily of sustained-release niacin dropped out due to upset stomachs, fatigue, or abnormal liver function tests. All of these side effects disappeared once the participants stopped taking the vitamin. Additional cause for concern comes from other reports suggesting that high doses of sustained-release niacin can cause jaundice and liver failure.
What if we look at erectile dysfunction as something that can be addressed as a condition other than a “pill for every ill”.   What if we actually look at a nutrient level that directly correlates to a medical condition and follow the science to give a directive on its recommendation?  Well it turns out taking a simple zinc supplement won’t help 100% of the time, but it certainly helps some of the time.
Besides, niacin’s beneficial effects became more evident when the Hong Kong study researchers excluded those already using statin therapy. If there is an overlapping effect of these two groups of lipid-lowering agents on endothelial function, this would make sense. Also, chronic statin use could lessen the effect of niacin on endothelial function and hence affect improvement in erectile function.
Health benefits and risks of copper Copper is an essential trace mineral that occurs in all body tissues. It is vital for a range of body functions including the production of red blood cells and energy, and the maintenance of nerve cells and the immune system. A copper deficiency can be harmful, but too much can be toxic. Learn more about copper here. Read now
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