Men can judge themselves pretty harshly when it comes to their performance in between the sheets. The unsettling fear of not being able to rise to the occasion becomes a reccurring nightmare for men that is often equated with failure, loss of dignity, and masculinity. If you suffer from erectile dysfunction (ED), don’t be so hard on yourself, since impotence can almost always be improved with treatment, without having to rely on Viagra or other medications. Whether you suffer from ED, or hope to prevent the condition, here are six tips to overcome impotence without the side effects of the little blue pill.
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, ingesting levels of zinc in excess of the recommended dietary amount will result in diarrhea, vomiting, and stomach cramps. The maximum amount of daily zinc consumption recommended is 40 milligrams per day. Symptoms of too much zinc intake include nausea and headaches. If you have reason to suspect you have ingested too much zinc, contact a medical professional.
The mind and body are intricately connected, and exploring this connection can help you combat stress and fatigue, both of which can contribute to erectile dysfunction. Adding mind-body exercise to your life helps lower stress, improve breathing, and reduce general tension. Yoga can also be terrific for improving your sense of well-being, and it’s great for helping keep you limber so you reduce the risk of sports-related injuries. Partnered yoga classes and routines let men engage in relaxing and beneficial exercise with their partners, and there are even specific yoga postures designed to improve blood circulation to the pelvic region.
Yohimbine also helps to increase levels of the coenzyme NAD (or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide). This affects metabolism, cognitive processes, and detoxification of drugs in the body. NAD is not currently used to treat cognitive or mood-related disorders on its own, but has been shown in some studies to potentially have uses for preventing neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson’s disease or Alzheimer’s. However on the other hand, studies have found that because it can increase anxiety in some patients, yohimbine may actually worsen mental illness in some patients, including those with Parkinson’s. (15) For this reason, it’s important for anyone taking mood-altering medications, or who has a history of any cognitive or mood disorder, to work with a professional while taking or starting any new herbal treatments.
Ginkgo biloba. Ginkgo is an herb that is used in Chinese medicine that’s thought to improve blood flow. "Any ED treatment that improves blood flow may help," explains Dr. Harris. "An erection is just blood in and blood out." However, the evidence that ginkgo can improve blood flow in ED is limited, and most experts say the jury is still out. In addition, ginkgo can increase the risk for bleeding problems if combined with certain medications, such as warfarin (Coumadin).
Before taking any medication for erectile dysfunction, including over-the-counter supplements and herbal remedies, get your doctor's OK. Medications for erectile dysfunction do not work in all men and might be less effective in certain conditions, such as after prostate surgery or if you have diabetes. Some medications might also be dangerous if you:
With the erectile dysfunction (ED) market expected to reach 3.4 billion dollars (USD) by 2019, this is a lucrative area to invest in, and not much grabs the attention of a guy watching a commercial during a Monday night football game than the promise to easily cure this problem with one pill as needed.  But is this the answer for everyone?  What causes ED?  For the guy with no apparent risk factors like depression or diabetes, hypothyroidism, injury or stress issues, erectile dysfunction or loss of libido (which don’t necessarily go hand in hand) can be confusing and frustrating for a guy as well as his partner.
However, the case is entirely different for Niacin, as it is not only relatively more convenient, but also it allows men to enjoy sex any time when they want even when they take Niacin for only one time in a day for erectile dysfunction. Niacin formulates in the form of various slow-release pills designed primarily to seep in a slow way within the human bloodstream during the course of one day.

Using the protocol of a clinical randomized placebo-controlled parallel-group trial, the study also took place at the University of Hong Kong. One hundred sixty male patients with ED and dyslipidemia were randomized into two groups receiving either up to 1,500 mg of oral niacin daily or placebo for 12 weeks. Using questions from the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF, particularly questions Q3 and Q4), the primary outcome was improvement in erectile function. Q3 ranked “frequency of penetration,” while Q4 ranked “frequency of maintained erections after penetration.” Other outcome measurements included the total IIEF score, IIEF-erectile function domain, and Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM) score.
ICI Alprostadil may be used as a mixture with two other drugs to treat ED. This combination therapy called "bimix or trimix" is stronger than alprostadil alone and has become standard treatment for ED. Only the Alprostadil ingredient is FDA approved for ED. The amount of each drug used can be changed based on the severity of your ED, by an experienced health professional. You will be trained by your health professional on how to inject, how much to inject and how to safely raise the drug's dosage if necessary.
3. Men With Bad Lipid Readings.  One study examined men with both erectile dysfunction and "dyslipidemia."  Dyslipidemia is medical speak for bad HDL, LDL, triglyceride or some combination of the three.  They gave these men 1.5 grams of niacin, which is a megadosed amount, and is a favorite of Dr. Davis.  (See my  Review of Track Your Plaque for Dr. Davis' approach to plaque regression.) Besides the above listed benefits, niacin will also a) lower triglycerides, b) boost HDL, c) increase particle size and d) decrease LDL particle counts.  All of these are very anti-atherosclerosis and great for your arteries. 
Pelvic floor PT is a proven and effective treatment for erectile dysfunction. A study in 2006 involved 146 men with mean age of 42 with pelvic pain; 92% of these men had sexual dysfunction.  Treatment consisted of trigger point release and relaxation training, which led to improvement in symptoms by 77-87% – it’s notable that kegels were not part of this study.
A study of 23 individuals found that a dose of 0.4mg/kg of yohimbine not only increased norepinephrine in the blood, blood pressure, and heart rate, but it also increases impulsive response rates. These response rates are measured by the number of impulsive errors, response biases, and reaction times on an immediate memory task. [10] While yohimbine may improve your reaction time it may also encourage you to act irrationally.

Yohimbe is an herbal remedy that comes from the bark of an African tree, Pausinystalia yohimbe. Before Viagra, drugs containing yohimbine hydrochloride, the active ingredient in yohimbe bark extract, were used to treat erectile dysfunction (ED). However, levels of yohimbine in yohimbe bark extract vary considerably and are often very low. Yohimbe bark extract, by itself, never has been shown to work as effectively as drugs containing yohimbine hydrochloride. What’s more, yohimbe can have serious side effects including paralysis, fatigue, stomach disorders, even death. I don’t recommend it, and harvesting of its bark is driving the yohimbe species to extinction.
Penile implants - are generally used if physical damage (like an accident) makes the anatomical parts needed for an erection not work. These are inserted by surgery and can provide a permanent treatment choice if others fail to work. The implants can be semi-rigid or inflatable. They can be pretty expensive and are not usually available on the NHS.
"The problem with alternative treatments for any medical problem, including erectile dysfunction, is that until you have about 20 well-controlled studies over several years, you really don't know what you are working with," cautions Richard Harris, MD, a urologist at Gottlieb Memorial Hospital, part of the Loyola University Health System in Chicago.
How it works: Magnesium makes it harder for your testosterone to bind onto proteins and allows for more of it to remain “free” in your bloodstream – which is exactly how you want it to be for a higher sex drive. Higher levels of free testosterone makes for more desire. Magnesium also combats anxiety and prevents depressive feelings, helping you enjoy yourself more.
MEDLINE is the U.S. National Library of Medicine's (NLM) premier bibliographic database that contains over 18 million references to journal articles in life sciences with a concentration on biomedicine. A distinctive feature of MEDLINE is that the records are indexed with NLM Medical Subject Headings (MeSH).The great majority of journals are selected for MEDLINE based on the recommendation of the Literature Selection Technical Review Committee (LSTRC), a National Institute of Health (NIH)-chartered advisory committee of external experts analogous to the committees that review NIH grant applications. MEDLINE is the primary component of PubMed, part of the entry series of databases provided by the NLM National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). MEDLINE may also be searched via the NLM Gateway (23).
The men started with a daily dose of 500 mg, to make sure they had no adverse side effects, then increased to 1,000 mg and then 1,500 mg. However, Men's Health warns that according to the US's Baylor College of Medicine urologist Larry Lipschultz, not only do niacin supplements often contain less of what the bottle says, "but ED can also be a precursor to heart disease -- a condition you should treat with your doctor's advice."

Much of the evidence shows high rates of vitamin D deficiency in patients with erectile dysfunction. In fact, one study of 3,400 participants found that men with vitamin D deficiency were 32% more likely to have trouble with erections when all other risk factors were controlled for. It’s a little on the nose that you need vitamin D for your “D,” but hey—science can be funny too.
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