Researchers in London set out to find out if the claims about Yohimbe were true. Could the bark of a tree actually increase libido and improve impotence? They performed a double-blind trial using yohimbine for the treatment of erection inadequacy. Men, aged 18-70 years, seeking help for the secondary erection inadequacy for 6 months or longer, took part in the trial. None of the participants had any serious psychiatric disease, hypertension or liver insufficiency. Half of the men were given 5.4mg of yohimbine, the other half a placebo, for 8 weeks. Patients were assessed in 4-week intervals. After 8 weeks of treatment, 37 percent said they had good erections, as compared to only 13% in the placebo group. After the 8-week treatment, the placebo group was given the yohimbine as well, results for improved stimulated erection after the second 8-week trial increased to a total of 42 percent overall.
Test was terminated after 15 minutes of observation or after ejaculation (whichever occurred first). Ejaculatory latencies were taken as 15 minutes when animals showed intromissions but failed to ejaculate during the test period. After analyzing the results, the following tests were performed with the group that indicated significantly positive effects compared to the controls:
Size matters, so get slim and stay slim. A trim waistline is one good defense — a man with a 42-inch waist is 50% more likely to have ED than one with a 32-inch waist. Losing weight can help fight erectile dysfunction, so getting to a healthy weight and staying there is another good strategy for avoiding or fixing ED. Obesity raises risks for vascular disease and diabetes, two major causes of ED. And excess fat interferes with several hormones that may be part of the problem as well.

The improvements in IIEF-erectile function domain (IIEF-EF) score for moderate and severe ED patients in the niacin group were 3.31 and 5.28 and in the placebo group were 2.74 and 2.65, respectively. In the lower range of mild and mild-to-moderate ED, there was no significant improvement in erectile function. Of the 160 patients in the study, 32 were using statins; 18 in the niacin group and 14 in the placebo group. For patients not receiving statin treatment, there was a significant improvement in IIEF-Q3 scores (0.47) for the niacin group, but not for the placebo group. To summarize, niacin alone can improve the erectile function in patients suffering from moderate to severe ED and dyslipidemia.
Knowing about your history of ED will help your health provider learn if your problems are because of your desire for sex, erection function, ejaculation, or orgasm (climax). Some of these questions may seem private or even embarrassing. However, be assured that your doctor is a professional and your honest answers will help find the cause and best treatment for you.
*all photos are models and not actual patients.If you are interested in a prescription product, Hims will assist in setting up a visit for you with an independent physician who will evaluate whether or not you are an appropriate candidate for the prescription product and if appropriate, may write you a prescription for the product which you can fill at the pharmacy of your choice.
Thirty two male rats were randomly assigned to four groups and submitted to one of the following daily treatment regimens: (a) 1 mg of ZnSO4 dissolved in 1 ml of distilled water. (b) 5 mg of ZnSO4 dissolved in 1 ml of distilled water (c) 10 mg of ZnSO4 dissolved in 1 ml of distilled water. Controls were provided with 1 ml of distilled water. Supplementation was done orally using a feeding tube. These daily regimens were continued for two weeks (daily at 17.00 hours) and housed two per cage.
Yohimbine has had questionable effects in men with organic erectile dysfunction. We conducted this study to better define the population of men responsive to yohimbine, because tobacco was thought to affect a regimen of yohimbine more than other risk factors. We measured nocturnal penile tumescence with the RigiScan™ monitor, hormone profiles, answers to the Florida Sexual Health Questionnaire, and clinical responses at baseline and after two different doses of yohimbine in 18 nonsmoking men with erectile dysfunction. Of the 18 men, nine (50%) were successful in completing intercourse in more than 75% of attempts. The yohimbine responders were men with less severe erectile dysfunction as manifested by improved increased rigidity on RigiScan™ testing, higher Florida Sexual Health Questionnaire scores, and slightly higher levels of serum testosterone. Yohimbine is an effective therapy to treat organic erectile dysfunction in some men with erectile dysfunction.
While eating magnesium-rich foods or taking a magnesium supplement at the proper dosage is safe for most men, the mineral can interfere or interact with some medications. Discuss the benefits and risks of altering your daily magnesium intake with your doctor, particularly if you take blood pressure medications, diuretics, diabetes medications or antibiotics. Men diagnosed with erectile dysfunction often require changes in other minerals and vitamins or even prescription medication. Ensuring a proper daily intake of magnesium may help maintain healthy erectile function, but magnesium alone is unlikely to cause a significant reduction in ED symptoms. Magnesium levels can also be affected by excess weight, chronic stress and excessive amounts of alcohol. These factors may also be partially responsible for erectile problems.
Vitamin C has been associated with higher sperm counts. You can get it naturally from strawberries, raspberries and blueberries, which are anthocyanins, colorful plant chemicals which help keep your arteries unclogged, boosting circulation and erection quality. In supplement stores, you’ll find all manner of megadoses — steer clear of those; they might do more harm than good.
In the United States, certain prescription drugs containing yohimbine have been approved since the 1980s. They are labeled Yohimbine hydrochloride (which go by the brand names Aphrodyne or Yocon). Yohimbine medications are prescribed most commonly to treat sexual dysfunction in both men and women caused by a number of factors like aging, hormonal imbalances or side effects of medications.
Guay and Spark observed independently (unpublished data) that yohimbine was associated with a very poor response in cigarette smokers. This is believed to be relevant, because studies several decades ago may have included a large percentage of smokers, which only recently has been recognized as a risk factor for erectile dysfunction. We tested this hypothesis by studying nonsmoking men with documented organic impotence and by judging whether any possible effect might be related to adrenal or testicular hormones, which, to our knowledge, has not been studied.
Vitamin B6 deficiency leads to irritability, numbness in the extremities, muscle weakness, fatigue, drowsiness, impaired mental activity, peripheral neuritis, seborrheic dermatitis, stomatitis, conjunctivitis, and, of course, impairment of sexual potency. Lack of this vitamin can be a result of long-term use of anti-tuberculosis drugs and chronic diseases of the gastrointestinal tract.
To locate the muscles these exercises engage, try to stop and restart the flow of urine mid-stream. Just do this once, because if you do it too much it can affect the passage of urine. Once you’ve located these muscles, you can tighten and draw the muscles in, feeling them lift upward. Hold for a count of five, then release. It’s recommended that men do 8 to 10 repetitions, resting in between. Ideally, each series of 8 to 10 should be followed by 5 to 10 quick squeezes and releases, and men should work up to doing the whole process four or five times per day for best results.

For Men: Soy is terrible for the male sex drive as the phytoestrogens build up to unnatural levels much too quickly. In fact, an ex boyfriend and I experimented with this when he decided to become vegan. He ate and drank soy products for a month and by the end of that time he had zero libido. Within two weeks of stopping all soy, he was back to normal.

Esposito et al (18), in their randomized study investigated the effect of physical activities on 110 obese subjects. They reported significant effect of physical activities on both body mass index and EF. The physiological rationales underlying this hypothesis are that healthy lifestyle factors are associated with maintenance of good erectile function in men (19); obesity has been positively associated with endothelial dysfunction and increased serum concentrations of vascular inflammatory markers (34, 35); and both endothelial and erectile dysfunction may share some common metabolic and vascular pathways that may be influenced by behavioral-related pathways (19, 36). Obese men with erectile dysfunction had evidence of abnormal endothelial function, which was indicated by reduced blood pressure and platelet aggregation responses to L-arginine and elevated serum concentrations of markers of low-grade inflammation, such as IL-6, IL-8, and CRP. It has been shown that there are significant associations between IEEF score and proxy indicators of elevated body fat, the vascular response to L-arginine, and circulating IL-8 and CRP levels. The association we found between IEEF score and indices of endothelial dysfunction supports the presence of common vascular pathways underlying both conditions in obese men. A disturbance in nitric oxide activity linked to reduced nitric oxide availability could provide a unifying explanation for this association. In particular, in isolated corpus cavernosum strips from patients with erectile dysfunction both neurogenic and endothelium-dependent relaxation is impaired (37).
Prostate problems are most common in older men, but it’s never too early to start looking after your prostate! Problems such as BPH (enlarged prostate) and prostatitis can cause unpleasant symptoms such as frequent urination, weak urine stream, difficulty urinating and sudden urges to urinate, which can really get in the way of daily life and interrupt sleep.
There’s evidence to show that Yohimbine may have some small effect in helping aid weight loss. In 1991, there was a study of 20 overweight women on diet of 1,000 calories per day. Each was given 20 mg of Yohimbine a day, and lost 3 pounds more than those who weren’t taking any. Any weight loss drug should, however, always be taken alongside a healthy diet and exercise.

Those looking to crank up their body's fat-burning to the next level may stack yohimbine HCL with ephedrine HCL and caffeine, creating the ECY stack. Yohimbine is a powerful stimulant that acts on different metabolic pathways compared to caffeine and ephedrine. The most common dosage for each compound in this stack is 5mg of yohimbine HCL, 200mg caffeine, and 25mg ephedrine HCL two to three times per day.

While the rationale behind why it would work is airtight, the research on arginine’s actual effect on erectile dysfunction is slim, points out Charles Walker, M.D., assistant professor of urology and cofounder of the Cardiovascular and Sexual Health clinic at Yale University. But given its solid safety profile, minimal side effects, and potential benefit on heart disease, it’s worth a try, he adds, especially when taken in conjunction with other herbs on this list, which studies have shown can be more effective.
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There are two things that need to be looked at in recommending a supplement for a medical condition: what is the physiology of the medical condition and what is the pharmacology of the supplement you are using.  There then is a search for a link between the two that leads to a tie in with a therapeutic approach.  In some ways this is like a logic course that says A causes B, B causes C therefor A causes C.  We then must apply this to the scientific method and finally the ultimate test: clinical response and safety.  This is often made out to be the gold standard for our typical Rx meds that I dispense every day, but often ridiculed when it crosses the barbed wired “nutraceutical” boarder.  If it is a nutrient then we must be getting the right amount in our food after all right?  Regardless of 1)what the real amount is in the food we eat, not to mention 2)the depletion that may be taking place of that nutrient due to a prescription drug we are taking (an absolute science based cause and effect) – we blindly accept what our food has in it and the level our bodies maintain – this is an incorrect assumption.  In fact it is quite ironic that the anti-nutraceutical court is still hanging onto this assumption when both are established by science.
Much of the evidence shows high rates of vitamin D deficiency in patients with erectile dysfunction. In fact, one study of 3,400 participants found that men with vitamin D deficiency were 32% more likely to have trouble with erections when all other risk factors were controlled for. It’s a little on the nose that you need vitamin D for your “D,” but hey—science can be funny too.
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