One study that evaluated the effects of yohimbine supplementation on body composition (muscle mass, body mass, etc.) and exercise performance in professional soccer players found that body fat percentage/fat mass significantly decreased in the yohimbine group compared to the placebo group. However, supplementation with yohimbine did not significantly alter overall body mass, muscle mass, or performance indicators. (10) Other studies, however, have found that people do tend to experience increases in energy and alertness when taking yohimbe, sometimes even so much that it causes symptoms of anxiety or restlessness (much like caffeine does).
Although there have been sufficient data on the relationship between ED and several wellrecognized risk factors which including aging, coronary artery disease, atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, high blood pressure, and pelvic surgeries, little attention has been paid by the urologists to the role of lifestyle factors in ED. However, accumulating data from basic science and clinical studies have determined a link between the occurrence of ED and a number of lifestyle factors, such as smoking, obesity, alcohol consumption, and lack of physical activity. The application of findings from animal and human studies to the clinical practice regarding the modification of lifestyle factors could help to improve ED as well as reducing the risks of developing cardiovascular diseases (14).
Athletes or dieters sometimes use products containing yohimbe to help promote easier weight loss, especially from body fat, and to increase energy expenditure. Some have speculated that it may help increase muscle mass and endurance while cutting fat. But there’s not much evidence from studies that this is necessarily true. Yohimbe does seem to have potential to increase energy expenditure by acting as a stimulant, increasing adrenaline levels in the body and potentially preventing fatigue during or following exercise.
There’s much evidence to suggest that Yohimbine does have a positive effect in men who have erectile dysfunction. Initially, it was considered a failure as a treatment because it doesn’t increase levels of testosterone in the body, the hormone needed for erections. However, recent trials have shown that it works well to increase arousal, help blood flow to the penis, and as a general stimulant.

Counselling or sex therapy (58% of people find this works for them) –mind-related causes of erectile dysfunction can affect anyone. They are more likely if you experience erectile dysfunction at a younger age. Talking to a counsellor or therapist can help some people overcome erectile dysfunction related to these problems, possibly for good. They can also help you if your erectile dysfunction is causing you stress, as this can make matters worse.

A study in the Journal of Sexual Medicine found that a large percentage of men with ED also have low levels of vitamin D. If you’re experiencing ED, you may want to have your level of vitamin D checked. Other symptoms of a low vitamin D level may be too subtle to notice. However, if you have serious vitamin D deficiency, you may have bone pain or muscle weakness. Vitamin D levels can be checked with a simple blood test and for most people corrected with a supplement.


We studied the involvement of zinc in the sexual behavioral response of male rats. The study design employed a rat model to predict the human sexual response to elemental zinc supplementation. Rats were used because they are very social and copulate under a variety of circumstances, regardless of the presence of a human experimenter. They are practical (small and easy to handle) and certain tissues and neuroendocrine systems are strikingly similar to humans.[13]
Niacin, prescribed for more than 50 years, has been successful in treating all three types of lipids in your bloodstream. It can reduce levels of low-density lipoprotein -- LDL, or “bad,” cholesterol -- and triglycerides, as well as elevate your levels of protective high-density lipoprotein -- HDL, or “good,” cholesterol. But other medications, as well as diet and lifestyle changes, can restore your cholesterol to heart-healthy levels. If you currently take niacin and want to start taking medication to treat erectile dysfunction, ask your doctor about switching to a different type of cholesterol medication.
Several studies (15–17) have shown an inverse relationship between physical activity levels and biomarkers of inflammation in both the healthy individuals and subjects with cardiovascular condition. Studies (18–21) have also reported the role of exercise in the management of erectile dysfunction. The majority of these studies are subjective, retrospective case series and non randomized non controlled studies. However, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are generally accepted as the most valid method for determining the efficacy of a therapeutic intervention, because the biases associated with other experimental designs can be avoided (22). Therefore, the purpose of the present Meta analysis study was to determine the role and effect of aerobic exercise in the management of erectile dysfunction in randomized controlled trials.
Shindel, A. W., Xin, Z.-C., Lin, G., Fandel, T. M., Huang, Y.-C., Banie, L., … Lue, T. F. (2010, February 5). Erectogenic and neurotrophic effects of icariin, a purified extract of horny goat weed (Epimedium spp.) in vitro and in vivo. The Journal of Sexual Medicine, 7(4), 1518-1528. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1743-6109.2009.01699.x/full
However, the case is entirely different for Niacin, as it is not only relatively more convenient, but also it allows men to enjoy sex any time when they want even when they take Niacin for only one time in a day for erectile dysfunction. Niacin formulates in the form of various slow-release pills designed primarily to seep in a slow way within the human bloodstream during the course of one day.
People who do not have any contra-indications (see below) generally tolerate it well. However, taking yohimbe can sometimes cause side effects including: high blood pressure, headaches, anxiety, restlessness/nervousness, dizziness or shakiness. These side effects seem to affect people with a history of mental illness or mood-related problems most often. But it’s possible for them to develop in anybody.

This study was designed to test the hypothesis that hydrochlorothiazide a diuretic used to treat hypertension depletes body zinc and thereby cause sexual dysfunction. Serum zinc and sexual dysfunction were measured in 39 middle aged hypertensive men who had been taking hydrochlorothiazide in average daily doses of between 25 and 50 mg daily for at least six months, and a control group of 27 unmedicated middle aged normotensive men. The medicated group had a higher incidence of sexual dysfunction (56 pc) as compared to 11 pc in the control group. The use of hydrochlorothiazide did affect serum zinc levels significantly in 20 patients. Sexual dysfunction occurred more often in older and overweight patients (p < 0.004). Three of the normotensive men experienced sexual dysfunction probably related to old age. Twenty two of the 39 on hydrochlorothiazide and experiencing sexual dysfunction were divided into two groups of 11 patients. Bloods were taken from the 27 normotensive and 22 hypertensive men receiving hydrochlorothiazide for the analyses of zinc. Subsequently one group of the patients were supplemented with zinc 500 mg daily for 30 days while the other group was supplemented with magnesium chloride 1 g daily for 30 days. The normotensive men were not treated. After 30 days, bloods were again taken from the three groups of analyses for zinc and magnesium. Serum zinc was significantly decreased (p < 0.05) by hydrochlorothiazide and a non significant decrease in serum magnesium (p = ns) was observed. After supplementation with zinc, the serum zinc levels returned to normal only in eight patients. There was improvement in the symptoms of sexual dysfunction in five patients. Two patients gained weight. Hydrochlorothiazide decreased serum zinc levels (p < 0.05) and was unchanged with magnesium supplementation but the serum magnesium returned to normal values. Improvement of symptoms of sexual dysfunction was positive in one patient. This study shows that low serum zinc levels may be associated with sexual dysfunction but the definitive role of zinc in the pathogenesis of sexual dysfunction will remain controversial.
Good information. However, be sure you are using yohimbine and not yohimbe. Reasons is that I had not realized this difference in the various products I was purchasing and I found out the hard way . Yohimbine can be sold at up to 2% at health food stores legally or you may ask your doctor and it can or is I believe prescribed at 8% yohimbine. I personally love yohimbine for helping me with depression and yes social anxiety. The form yohimbe is much cheaper but the alcoloids can include other stimulate ingredients and the active ingredient the yohimbine is not standardized leaving the user at risk of an uncertain but generally unpleasant overstimulation similar to to much coffee only worse and can last a rather long time up to 10 or more hours. So please just use Yohimbine 2percent and you should be safe . As always consult your medical doctor before taking any new supplements.
The sunshine vitamin will brighten things up in the bedroom. In a recent study published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine, Italian researchers found that of 143 men with erectile dysfunction, 80% had less-than-optimal levels of D, and the men with severe ED had, on average, a 24% lower level of D than with a milder condition. They theorize that low levels of D damage blood vessels and lead to a shortage of nitric oxide.
The search criteria identified 210 studies from 1972 to 2010; on inserting randomized controlled trials only 26 studies were identified out of which only 5 met the inclusion criteria and 21 studies did not meet the inclusion criteria, hence, were excluded. Five (18, 24–27) randomized controlled trials (RCTs) met the inclusion criteria; studies involved the use of aerobic exercise in the management of ED, the IIEF was the assessment tool for ED and also involved control groups. A total of 385 subjects were involved: Lamina et al (25), n=43; Lamina et al (26), n=43; Esposito et al (18), n= 110; Kalka et al (27), n= 129; Maio, Saraed and Marchiori (24), n= 60.
These are not currently approved by the FDA for ED management, but they may be offered through research studies (clinical trials). Patients who are interested should discuss the risks and benefits (informed consent) of each, as well as costs before starting any clinical trials. Most therapies not approved by the FDA are not covered by government or private insurance benefits.
Partner preference index in both 5 mg zinc treated group and controls was positive. In the control group, time spent by males, with estrous and diestrous females, was 21.75 sec. (SEM 2.26) and 13.62 sec. (SEM 1.05) respectively. In the zinc treated group they spent 20.87 sec. (2.09 SEM) with estrous and 14.37 sec. (SEM 0.70) with diestrous females. The PPI of controls and zinc treated group was 8.12 Sec. (SEM 2.32) and 6.50 Sec. (SEM 1.76) respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups, P > 0.05.
Zinc is a trace metallic element that occurs naturally in the earth. Certain vegetables, meats, and seafood have more zinc content than others. This makes it fairly easy to obtain zinc through a varied diet. An extreme zinc deficiency is rare in the United States, as most people get some zinc through the foods that they eat. However, when levels of zinc fall below the recommended threshold, problems begin.
×