[notice color=’#ebebeb’]Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) takes an active part in the production of certain hormones and erythrocytes and in the synthesis of ATP, a so-called life fuel. In addition, it protects the human retina from excessive exposure to UV radiation, ensures the dark adaptation of the human eye, increases visual acuity and perception of colour and light. Riboflavin is needed for tissue growth and tissue regeneration.[/notice]

Are you reading article after article wondering how to put a stop to erectile dysfunction? There is no shame in suffering from erectile dysfunction, being as common condition as it is, erectile dysfunction is one of the leading health problems in men. The researchers suggest that every man will suffer from erectile dysfunction at some point of their life. So, if you have been wandering the Internet with the hope of finding out about the ways you could use to cure your condition, or if you want to get informed about the topic of erectile dysfunction, you are in the right place.
This study was designed to test the hypothesis that hydrochlorothiazide a diuretic used to treat hypertension depletes body zinc and thereby cause sexual dysfunction. Serum zinc and sexual dysfunction were measured in 39 middle aged hypertensive men who had been taking hydrochlorothiazide in average daily doses of between 25 and 50 mg daily for at least six months, and a control group of 27 unmedicated middle aged normotensive men. The medicated group had a higher incidence of sexual dysfunction (56 pc) as compared to 11 pc in the control group. The use of hydrochlorothiazide did affect serum zinc levels significantly in 20 patients. Sexual dysfunction occurred more often in older and overweight patients (p < 0.004). Three of the normotensive men experienced sexual dysfunction probably related to old age. Twenty two of the 39 on hydrochlorothiazide and experiencing sexual dysfunction were divided into two groups of 11 patients. Bloods were taken from the 27 normotensive and 22 hypertensive men receiving hydrochlorothiazide for the analyses of zinc. Subsequently one group of the patients were supplemented with zinc 500 mg daily for 30 days while the other group was supplemented with magnesium chloride 1 g daily for 30 days. The normotensive men were not treated. After 30 days, bloods were again taken from the three groups of analyses for zinc and magnesium. Serum zinc was significantly decreased (p < 0.05) by hydrochlorothiazide and a non significant decrease in serum magnesium (p = ns) was observed. After supplementation with zinc, the serum zinc levels returned to normal only in eight patients. There was improvement in the symptoms of sexual dysfunction in five patients. Two patients gained weight. Hydrochlorothiazide decreased serum zinc levels (p < 0.05) and was unchanged with magnesium supplementation but the serum magnesium returned to normal values. Improvement of symptoms of sexual dysfunction was positive in one patient. This study shows that low serum zinc levels may be associated with sexual dysfunction but the definitive role of zinc in the pathogenesis of sexual dysfunction will remain controversial.
What it’ll do for you: “Yohimbe dilates the blood vessels and can lower blood pressure,” says Dr. Patrick M. Fratellone, an integrated physician with a practice in Manhattan. “So experts figured, if it can do that, it must give you an erection and treat erectile dysfunction.” Some proponents say that yohimbe extracts are powerful antioxidants that can prevent heart attacks, act as a stimulant and an anti-depressant, and an aid to weight loss. Here, a closer look at the key benefits:

In the statistical analysis, the difference between the pre-test and post-test values (changed score) for IIEF score was computed. Student t-test was used to compare the mean changed score values of IIEF. All statistical analysis was performed on an IBM compatible micro computer using SPSS for window version 15.0, (Chicago IL, USA). The probability level for all the above tests was set at 0.05 to indicate significance.


These results are remarkable, because it appears that not only can niacin improve short term erectile function in many men, but also can likely help to reverse arterial plaque if a comprehensive program is undertaken.  Of course, neither I nor anyone else knows how safe megadosed niacin is long term, but many experts consider it safe when used under the care of a knowledgeable physician.  You'll have to do your own due diligence.
Research suggests that drinking alcohol may play a part in erectile problems. One study that considered the prevalence of ED among people diagnosed with alcohol dependence syndrome found that heavy drinkers were more likely to experience sexual dysfunction. Experts also believe that the depressant effect of alcohol can inhibit sexual response and even suppress libido in some people.
None of the parameters showed a significant difference between controls and the group treated with 1 mg of zinc. The percentage of males who engaged in intromission (% intromitted), was significantly reduced in 10 mg/day zinc group; only three animals showed the particular behavior. Similarly percentage of rats which ended up with ejaculation significantly decreased with the high dose (two out of eight). Libido index of the highest zinc treated group was significantly low compared to controls; (38 % vs. 88 %, P < 0.05). Number of mounts and intromissions was also significantly decreased in the same group; Number of mounts: 1.58 (SEM 3.16) vs. 11.0 (SEM 1.59) and number of intromissions 2.13 (SEM 4.27) vs. 11.0 (SEM 1.59), P < 0.05).
Some people experience symptoms of sexual dysfunction, including ED or loss of interest in sex, when taking medications for depression or anxiety disorders called selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). (9) Yohimbine-containing medications are not intended to treat these symptoms. However, some doctors use yohimbine to offset negative effects of treating mental illnesses. It can also decrease lethargy or low pressure since it acts as a mild stimulant. Additionally it may help to prevent complications in diabetic patients including diabetic neuropathy.
This study was designed to test the hypothesis that hydrochlorothiazide a diuretic used to treat hypertension depletes body zinc and thereby cause sexual dysfunction. Serum zinc and sexual dysfunction were measured in 39 middle aged hypertensive men who had been taking hydrochlorothiazide in average daily doses of between 25 and 50 mg daily for at least six months, and a control group of 27 unmedicated middle aged normotensive men. The medicated group had a higher incidence of sexual dysfunction (56 pc) as compared to 11 pc in the control group. The use of hydrochlorothiazide did affect serum zinc levels significantly in 20 patients. Sexual dysfunction occurred more often in older and overweight patients (p < 0.004). Three of the normotensive men experienced sexual dysfunction probably related to old age. Twenty two of the 39 on hydrochlorothiazide and experiencing sexual dysfunction were divided into two groups of 11 patients. Bloods were taken from the 27 normotensive and 22 hypertensive men receiving hydrochlorothiazide for the analyses of zinc. Subsequently one group of the patients were supplemented with zinc 500 mg daily for 30 days while the other group was supplemented with magnesium chloride 1 g daily for 30 days. The normotensive men were not treated. After 30 days, bloods were again taken from the three groups of analyses for zinc and magnesium. Serum zinc was significantly decreased (p < 0.05) by hydrochlorothiazide and a non significant decrease in serum magnesium (p = ns) was observed. After supplementation with zinc, the serum zinc levels returned to normal only in eight patients. There was improvement in the symptoms of sexual dysfunction in five patients. Two patients gained weight. Hydrochlorothiazide decreased serum zinc levels (p < 0.05) and was unchanged with magnesium supplementation but the serum magnesium returned to normal values. Improvement of symptoms of sexual dysfunction was positive in one patient. This study shows that low serum zinc levels may be associated with sexual dysfunction but the definitive role of zinc in the pathogenesis of sexual dysfunction will remain controversial.
Low levels of zinc can be the cause for a variety of health-related problems. Zinc is a key mineral that cells use to metabolize nutrients. Immune function, DNA and protein production, and cell division are all related to zinc levels in the body. Zinc also enables the male body to produce testosterone. Because of this, your levels of zinc may affect erectile dysfunction.
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