Reiter, W. J., Pycha, A., Schatzl, G., Pokorny, A., Gruber, D. M., Huber, J. C., & Marberger, M. (1999, March). Dehydroepiandrostone in the treatment of erectile dysfunction: A prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study [Abstract]. Urology, 53(3), 590-594. Retrieved from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0090429598005718
Poor sleep patterns can be a contributing factor for erectile dysfunction, Mucher says. One review published in the journal Brain Research emphasized the intricate relationship between the level of sex hormones like testosterone, sexual function, and sleep, noting that testosterone levels increase with improved sleep, and lower levels are associated with sexual dysfunction. Hormone secretion is controlled by the body’s internal clock, and sleep patterns likely help the body determine when to release certain hormones. 

Past research has suggested that living a healthier life full of exercise and a good diet can bring men back to sexual health. But according to researchers at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, most of these studies underrepresented African-American men. “This study is the first to link the benefits of exercise in relation to improved erectile and sexual function in a racially diverse group of patients,” said senior author of the study Dr. Adriana Vidal, of Cedars-Sinai Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute and Department of Surgery, in a press release.
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Handful of things can cause erectile dysfunction, but healthy vitamins supply for erection will make your sex life very soothing and romantic. Healthy blood vessels are necessary for good circulation, as blood is pumped around the body to carry nutrients to the cells. Vitamins can help the blood vessels to dilate or open so blood can fill the manhood. 
Several studies have shown that erectile dysfunction is somehow linked to problems with cardiovascular health — which one comes first has been the question. It makes sense; the penis becomes erect through a complex system of blood vessels and spongy tissue called the corpora cavernosa — this is where the blood gets trapped, causing the erection. When problems arise through this system, whether they’re caused in the brain or through problems with the blood vessels, the penis can’t get erect.
There are many different reasons a man’s ability to sustain or maintain an erection may be impaired. Impotence is the most common sexual disorder among men. It is thought that most men should be able to achieve and maintain an erection well into their 80s, but about 25 percent of all men over the age of 50 are thought to experience some form of impotence. By the age of 75, half of all men will be impotent. Impotence may come and go, depending on the state of their physical health as well as their stress levels. One of the number one causes of impotence is cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease may restrict blood flow to the penile tissues, which greatly affects a man’s ability to achieve and maintain an erection during sexual arousal.

There’s much evidence to suggest that Yohimbine does have a positive effect in men who have erectile dysfunction. Initially, it was considered a failure as a treatment because it doesn’t increase levels of testosterone in the body, the hormone needed for erections. However, recent trials have shown that it works well to increase arousal, help blood flow to the penis, and as a general stimulant.
In addition to getting helpful nutrients from your diet, you can also consider supplementing. Many of these are also on my list of top five supplements to increase sex drive, so they’re helpful for overall sexual health. It’s a good idea to check in with a practitioner, particularly one with knowledge of your individual health issues and medications, before taking anything. Here are some I recommend:
When it comes to maintaining your libido, the B vitamins, found in beef, liver, and fish, are all your wingmen, but niacin (a.k.a. Vitamin B3) is especially helpful. In a study published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine, men suffering from impotence who took a niacin supplement reported a significant improvement in their bedroom performance than men who took a placebo. Stock up on these best foods to eat for niacin!
So, in establishing physiology, pharmacology, clinical results and safety, zinc is a good choice when you look at cost and side effect profile as well as ease of availability and interaction profile with other meds and other medical conditions.  Having said all of this, there is no bulletproof evidence out there guaranteeing that increasing your zinc consumption either in food or via a supplement will improve ED or increase libido.  Even if a patient experiences an increase in testosterone from such a supplementation, this is not a certain gateway to resolution of theses symptoms as there is more to it than just one hormone level.  However for those that are experiencing problems in these areas, it is certainly worth a try for them.  The patient should be mindful however that supplements should be treated like any other medication and trying to increase your testosterone shouldn’t be done without consultation with your doctor and pharmacist.  You should also check for any interactions with any meds or medical conditions before trying any supplement as well.

In a 2005 study, three months of twice-daily sets of kegel exercises combined with biofeedback and advice on lifestyle changes, such as quitting smoking, losing weight, and limiting alcohol, worked far better than just giving the participants advice. “Wearing tight pants will affect impotence along with some other medical conditions like diabetes and heart disease,” which can also affect a man’s degree of impotence, Dr. Jennifer Burns, specializing in family practice with an emphasis on gastrointestinal health at the BienEtre Center, told Medical Daily.
A double-blind, partial crossover study on the therapeutic effect of yohimbine hydrochloride on erectile dysfunction was done in 82 sexually impotent patients. All patients underwent a multifactorial evaluation, including determination of penile brachial blood pressure index, cavernosography, sacral evoked response, testosterone and prolactin determination, Derogatis sexual dysfunction inventory and daytime arousal test. After 1 month of treatment with a maximum of 42.0 mg. oral yohimbine hydrochloride daily 14 per cent of the patients experienced restoration of full and sustained erections, 20 per cent reported a partial response to the therapy and 65 per cent reported no improvement. Three patients reported a positive placebo effect. Maximum effect takes 2 to 3 weeks to manifest itself. Yohimbine was active in some patients with arterial insufficiency and a unilateral sacral reflex arc lesion, and in 1 with low serum testosterone levels. The 34 per cent response is encouraging, particularly in a Veterans Administration population presenting with a high incidence of diabetes and vascular pathological conditions not found in regular office patients. Only few and benign side effects were recorded, which makes this medication worth an attempt, often as a first line of treatment even at a dose of 8 tablets.
The paired t-test was used to assess differences in responses using various doses of yohimbine in responders and nonresponders. Responder and nonresponder changes in tumescence, rigidity, and other physiologic responses over the entire study period were compared using independent t-tests (assuming equal variances). Independent t-tests were repeated to determine whether significant differences existed in the mean numbers of risk factors, age, or side effects among groups. Matched pairs t-tests were used to compare Florida Sexual History Questionnaire responses at each dose. Finally, χ2 analysis (or Fisher's exact test when appropriate) was used to compare the two groups on dichotomous sexual satisfaction ratings at the end of the trial; 95% confidence intervals were consistently examined to determine the magnitudes of differences detected. Two-tailed P-levels were used in reporting all results. SPSS 9.0 statistical software (SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL, USA) was used for analysis.
This is one B team you want to get on pronto: A recent report from Harvard University highlighted a study that has linked low levels of B12 to erectile dysfunction. A causal link hasn’t been nailed down, but the B vitamin is used by every system in the body, particularly in cell metabolism and the production of blood — two essential factors in getting and keeping a quality erection.
Research in the medical journal Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine found that supplementing with the mineral zinc, along with the vitamins folic acid and biotin, as well as the herb Rhodiola rosea improved ejaculatory control in males suffering from premature ejaculation. Premature ejaculation is a common type of sexual dysfunction that affects 20 to 30 percent of men between the ages of 18 and 55. The low incidence of any side-effects of these natural treatments may also make it preferable to drug treatments by many men.
One study found that sticking to a Mediterranean diet rich in virgin olive oil, vegetables, fruits, whole grains, nuts, and fish was associated with a lower risk of ED development and improvement in people who already suffered from ED. There is also some evidence that vegetarian and vegan diets may lower the risk of some types of heart disease, which in turn decreases the likelihood of developing ED.

What if we look at erectile dysfunction as something that can be addressed as a condition other than a “pill for every ill”.   What if we actually look at a nutrient level that directly correlates to a medical condition and follow the science to give a directive on its recommendation?  Well it turns out taking a simple zinc supplement won’t help 100% of the time, but it certainly helps some of the time.
If other options sound boring, maybe you should consider a fun, revved-up option like salsa dancing. You and your partner can lose yourself in the music, and it’s an intense exercise that engages the senses, combining cardio, balance, and coordination. Plus salsa dancing is great for keeping weight under control because it burns a lot of calories. Furthermore, it’s an activity that can build self-confidence, and if you’re single, the classes can be terrific for meeting new people. Regular exercise doesn’t have to be drudgery, and there are many types of dance classes that can seriously improve fitness and help you address erectile dysfunction.
In conclusion, aerobic training can successfully treat ED in selected patients with arterogenic ED. However, there are very few high-quality randomized trials regarding aerobic training and ED. Practitioners should bear in mind that aerobic training and other risk factors modification is associated with higher rates of ED management success.Since these results are based on small studies, the evidence would be stronger if confirmed by large trials. Effectiveness data were limited; however, the effectiveness of ED is largely determined by the patient health status and associated condition. In addition, work is needed in the standardization of follow-up protocols, evaluation of ED management success and failure, patient selection, and statistical analysis. More randomized studies that compare various exercise techniques are warranted. These studies should evaluate efficacy, complications, quality of life, cost implications, and long-term outcomes of ED management compare to other therapeutic modalities available. Also more database search is also warranted to further broaden the data search on the topic.
Zinc is a trace metallic element that occurs naturally in the earth. Certain vegetables, meats, and seafood have more zinc content than others. This makes it fairly easy to obtain zinc through a varied diet. An extreme zinc deficiency is rare in the United States, as most people get some zinc through the foods that they eat. However, when levels of zinc fall below the recommended threshold, problems begin.
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