The Medline (Pubmed) electronic database was searched (from June 1972 to November 2010) for systematic reviews that evaluated the effects of therapeutic exercise on ED. The key words and search terms used to develop the search strategy for each of these databases included: exercise therapy, aerobic exercise, therapeutic exercise, rehabilitation exercise, impotence and erectile dysfunction. In addition, the electronic searches were supplemented by checking the reference lists of any relevant identified articles.
Several studies (15–17) have shown an inverse relationship between physical activity levels and biomarkers of inflammation in both the healthy individuals and subjects with cardiovascular condition. Studies (18–21) have also reported the role of exercise in the management of erectile dysfunction. The majority of these studies are subjective, retrospective case series and non randomized non controlled studies. However, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are generally accepted as the most valid method for determining the efficacy of a therapeutic intervention, because the biases associated with other experimental designs can be avoided (22). Therefore, the purpose of the present Meta analysis study was to determine the role and effect of aerobic exercise in the management of erectile dysfunction in randomized controlled trials.
Allow me to explain. We know that cardiovascular disease is the number-one killer of men in the United States. Well, the “vascular” part of cardiovascular disease means that the cause is really blockage of the arteries around the heart, a process called atherosclerosis. It’s proven that over half of heart attacks occur in men with normal cholesterol. And many times, heart disease develops without warnings, causing sudden cardiac arrest.  So any early warning sign can be a life saver — and might compel you to get checked out before the big one hits.
Ancient Incans consumed this energizing Peruvian plant before battle or a bout of sex, Chris Kilham, an ethnobotanist at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, told Outside Online. Maca increases sexual appetite, stamina, endurance, and fertility. One 2008 study conducted at the Depression Clinical and Research Program at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston found that maca helped people with antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction to regain their libidos.
Men can judge themselves pretty harshly when it comes to their performance in between the sheets. The unsettling fear of not being able to rise to the occasion becomes a reccurring nightmare for men that is often equated with failure, loss of dignity, and masculinity. If you suffer from erectile dysfunction (ED), don’t be so hard on yourself, since impotence can almost always be improved with treatment, without having to rely on Viagra or other medications. Whether you suffer from ED, or hope to prevent the condition, here are six tips to overcome impotence without the side effects of the little blue pill.
Niacin or Vitamin B3 has proved to be helpful in improving both lipid levels and cholesterol among patients suffering from the problem of atherosclerosis i.e. accumulation of waste fats across the walls of the human blood vessel. Because of this, Niacin is helpful in the treatment of erectile dysfunction, as ED and atherosclerosis have more or less similar causes.
Two years ago I took regular Niacine for about a year to lower LDL and increase HDL. I did not want to take Statins because of its side effects. I was being monitored by my Dr. because of the effect on liver enzymes. I took 1.5 gr together with Phytosterols. The treatment was effective and the only side effect were the flushes which I found could be eliminated by having 500 mg at the end of each of the 3 main meals. I stopped treatment for a year or so, but now the Dr. suggested I start taking Niacine. or Statins. I chose Niacine (Nicotine Acid) and started with 500 mgs for 3 days; increased it to 1000 mgs. for 4 more days, until I increased it to 500 mgs x 3 for a total of 1.5 grms/day taking 500 mgms/meal. I started noticing my gradual decrease in libido this time almost inmediately. I do not take any other medicines as such I'm definitely inclined to blame Niacine because I have taken Phytosterols for 3 years and my libido was fine. I'm a senior. Hope this will help!

Besides that, dyslipidemia (and hypercholesterolemia in particular), remain undertreated in many patients diagnosed with coronary artery disease. High triglycerides, a contributor to cardiovascular dysfunction by many but not all studies, are somewhat treatable with fibrates, yet there are significant limitations for their use. Elevated fasting triglyceride levels have been shown to be a strong risk factor for ischemic heart disease, independent of other known risk factors for atherosclerosis.
Niacin is another class of lipid-lowering agents, about which research dates back at least 55 years.2 Not only does niacin lower low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C, the “bad” cholesterol), total cholesterol, and triglycerides, it increases HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C, the “good” cholesterol) by inhibition of lipolysis in adipose tissue, which eventually leads to improvement in all lipid parameters. Furthermore, there are studies suggesting that niacin can improve the clinical outcome in cardiovascular disease, and that it may lead to the regression of atherosclerotic plaque. Dyslipidemia is closely related to erectile dysfunction (ED) and evidence has shown that statins can improve erectile function. However, the potential role of that other lipid-lowering agent, niacin, hasn’t been known until now.
3. Testosterone replacement. Before oral medications like Viagra, testosterone was routinely used to treat erectile dysfunction as it is central in the male sexual response, including the desire for sex and the process of getting an erection. Testosterone can be administered in a number of ways, for example orally, by means of an injection, skin patch, or subcutaneous (under the skin) pellet. 
It’s important to note that high levels of zinc can reduce available copper in the body and affect iron levels. High levels of zinc can also interfere with different kinds of medications. Though it is estimated that 40 milligrams of zinc supplement are safe for men to take daily, there is no long-term research into the effects that this practice could yield.
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