Could the bark of a tree actually increase libido and improve impotence? Well yes it can… Yohimbe bark (Pausinystalia yohimbe), one of the most popular herbal remedies for male sexual dysfunction, has been shown in studies to increase blood flow to the genitals of both men and women, proving to be helpful for those with low libido. Though Yohimbe can be used by women, its actions have been shown to be extremely supportive for men experiencing erectile dysfunction due to stress or as a side effect of physiological health issues.
Long prescribed for women who want to restore muscle tone after childbirth, pelvic floor exercises, also known as Kegel exercises, can benefit men significantly too. A study by researchers at the University of West of England in Bristol showed that pelvic floor exercises can help men with erectile dysfunction and premature ejaculation. Furthermore, experts think these exercises can make orgasms stronger. Once learned, pelvic floor exercises can be done any time, even while doing other things.
So, in establishing physiology, pharmacology, clinical results and safety, zinc is a good choice when you look at cost and side effect profile as well as ease of availability and interaction profile with other meds and other medical conditions.  Having said all of this, there is no bulletproof evidence out there guaranteeing that increasing your zinc consumption either in food or via a supplement will improve ED or increase libido.  Even if a patient experiences an increase in testosterone from such a supplementation, this is not a certain gateway to resolution of theses symptoms as there is more to it than just one hormone level.  However for those that are experiencing problems in these areas, it is certainly worth a try for them.  The patient should be mindful however that supplements should be treated like any other medication and trying to increase your testosterone shouldn’t be done without consultation with your doctor and pharmacist.  You should also check for any interactions with any meds or medical conditions before trying any supplement as well.
Zinc affects different aspects of mammalian reproduction. Testicular disruption, impaired spermatogenesis and subsequent poor semen parameters are found in males with zinc deficiency. Testicular concentration of zinc was lower in male sheep fed with zinc deficient diets. The same animals showed smaller seminiferous tubules and less lumen development than the controls.[1] Similarly variable degrees of maturation arrest in different stages of spermatogenesis with reduced diameter of seminiferous tubules were noted when rats were fed with zinc deficient diets.[2] Zinc deficiency causes a reduction in the structural parameters of seminiferous tubules influences serum levels of testosterone (T) and prolactin (PRL) in rats.[3,4]
In the present study zinc caused an elevation of T. This showed an increase from 2.39 to 8.21 ng/dl after two weeks of zinc treatment. This elevated T level may have contributed to the increase in number of penile thrusting (from 26.5 to 52.8) observed. Supplementation with 459 μmol/day of zinc for three months, in marginally zinc deficient healthy elderly men, has been shown to increase the levels of serum T from 8.3 to 16 ng/dl.[25] Laboratory experiments indicate that the nitric oxide erectile pathway is T dependent.[26] Many studies using animal models have confirmed that T is important in modulating the central and peripheral regulation of erectile dysfunction. T deprivation has a negative impact on the structure of penile tissues and erectile nerves.[27] Thus, elevated T levels subsequent to zinc supplementation may increase the sexual competence via rigid and sustained erection. This may promote greater tactile stimulation of the penis due to increased contact with vagina.[25]
Andrew McCullough, MD, associate professor of clinical urology and director, male sexual health program, New York University Langone Medical Center. Lecturer: Auxillium. Research grant: Pfizer. Data safety monitoring board: Pfizer. Consultant: Slate Pharmaceuticals. Clinical trials: Warner Chilcott, Vivus, Lilly, Bayer-GSK, ICOS, Timm, Schering Plough, Aeterna.
The key to all of this is the endothelium, the inner lining of blood vessels that helps blood flow smoothly. Regular exercise has been shown to improve the way the endothelium works. The endothelium lines the blood vessels in the heart and the penis, explains Dr. Hellstrom, but the blood vessels in the penis are about one-third the size of those in the heart. So if you fail to have erections due to vascular problems, that indicates that you’re at risk for heart problems as well.
Before taking any medication for erectile dysfunction, including over-the-counter supplements and herbal remedies, get your doctor's OK. Medications for erectile dysfunction do not work in all men and might be less effective in certain conditions, such as after prostate surgery or if you have diabetes. Some medications might also be dangerous if you:
Adequate daily magnesium intake is slightly lower for younger men than for those in their 30s and older. The University of Maryland Medical Center recommends 400 mg daily for men between the ages of 19 and 30, and 420 mg per day for men 31 and older. While these levels are a good general guideline, you should check with your doctor to determine the proper dosage for a daily magnesium supplement, particularly if you’re using magnesium to help treat or prevent erectile problems.

Penile erection is a hemodynamic process involving increased arterial inflow and restricted venous outflow, coordinated with corpus cavernosum and penile arterial smooth muscle relaxation. Any problem in this mechanism results in Erectile Dysfunction and its etiology is generally multifactorial. This study is aimed at determining the objective outcome of aerobic training in the management of Erectile Dysfunction of arterogenic origin using Meta analysis.
A physical exam checks your total health. Examination focusing on your genitals (penis and testicles) is often done to check for ED. Based on your age and risk factors, the exam may also focus on your heart and blood system: heart, peripheral pulses and blood pressure. Based on your age and family history your doctor may do a rectal exam to check the prostate. These tests are not painful. Most patients do not need a lot of testing before starting treatment.
Low levels of zinc can be the cause for a variety of health-related problems. Zinc is a key mineral that cells use to metabolize nutrients. Immune function, DNA and protein production, and cell division are all related to zinc levels in the body. Zinc also enables the male body to produce testosterone. Because of this, your levels of zinc may affect erectile dysfunction.
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