[notice color=’#ebebeb’]Folic acid is very crucial for men since it stimulates the sperm production and improves the function of the cardiovascular system. And this, in turn, contributes to the improvement of sexual function in men. Therefore, if you use vitamin B9 for erectile dysfunction treatment, you will improve your male potency as well.[/notice]
If you can't take one of these oral medications, your physician may have you try Caverject (alprostadil for injection), a hormone that you inject into your penis using a fine needle, or Muse (alprostadil urogenital), a tiny suppository that you insert into the tip of the penis. Both of these will bring on an erection within five to 15 minutes without sexual stimulation.
Some medical self-help books make niacin sound like a panacea for health-conscious people with rising cholesterol levels and shrinking budgets. Because this B vitamin is cheap and sold over-the-counter at drug and health food stores, people see no reason to check with the doctor before tossing back a handful of pills. What they may not know is that the high doses (1,500-3,000 mg) needed to lower cholesterol levels can cause serious complications. (As a dietary supplement, 10-20 mg is usually recommended). To add to the confusion, niacin comes in two forms: immediate- and sustained-release preparations.
E.D. may just be that early warning sign. Erections depend on blood flow, and blood flow depends on nice, wide-open arteries. Atherosclerosis doesn’t just affect the arteries around your heart; if you have plaque build-up, you are likely to have it all around the arterial system — and the penile artery is one of the smallest arteries you have (no matter what you claim about your size). So if you have atherosclerosis, then the plaque there will be one of the first places where you would notice a decline in blood flow.

The human body only contains 2 or 3 grams of zinc at any given time. Zinc is distributed throughout the body in organs, blood, and bones. It can be difficult to diagnose zinc deficiency. While a low blood zinc level does indicate a deficiency, a normal blood level does not necessarily indicate the absence of a deficiency. And examination of the hair for zinc or a zinc taste test (ZTT) may also be used for supportive evidence in the diagnosis of zinc deficiency.

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