3. Men With Bad Lipid Readings.  One study examined men with both erectile dysfunction and "dyslipidemia."  Dyslipidemia is medical speak for bad HDL, LDL, triglyceride or some combination of the three.  They gave these men 1.5 grams of niacin, which is a megadosed amount, and is a favorite of Dr. Davis.  (See my  Review of Track Your Plaque for Dr. Davis' approach to plaque regression.) Besides the above listed benefits, niacin will also a) lower triglycerides, b) boost HDL, c) increase particle size and d) decrease LDL particle counts.  All of these are very anti-atherosclerosis and great for your arteries. 
Clinically I have seen these results in doses of just 20 mg twice daily.   It is important to note that prolonged zinc supplementation can lead to lowered copper levels so it is not advisable to continue this therapy unless it is in a cyclical nature.  For those on long term zinc there are combination products with Zinc and Copper.   In cases where some prescriptions that lower zinc are given, like acid lowering meds, thiazide diuretics and ACE inhibitors, or in renal dialysis patients, this chronic monitoring of zinc may lead to longer term supplementation.
Lifestyle changes like getting more exercise and adjusting your diet can help. In a study of obese men with E.D. who restricted calories for two years and were advised to be more active, participants not only lost weight but also experienced decreased severity of their E.D. Research also shows aerobic exercise can significantly lower your risk of erectile dysfunction thanks to its ability to boost blood flow and circulation. Eating certain foods can also reduce incidence of E.D.
The men started with a daily dose of 500 mg, to make sure they had no adverse side effects, then increased to 1,000 mg and then 1,500 mg. However, Men's Health warns that according to the US's Baylor College of Medicine urologist Larry Lipschultz, not only do niacin supplements often contain less of what the bottle says, "but ED can also be a precursor to heart disease -- a condition you should treat with your doctor's advice."
Where it comes from: Yohimbe is derived from the bark of a west African evergreen tree. Yohimbine is an active chemical (an alkaloid) found in said bark and is cultivated into supplement form. Yohimbine hydrochloride is a standardized form of yohimbine that is available as a prescription drug in the United States. These terms are all related but are interchangeable.
Although not every study has shown that yohimbe can have slimming effects, certain other studies have found positive results. One study found that yohimbine significantly increased mean weight loss in overweight female patients following a low-energy diet. (12) Possible mechanisms of action include: boosting lipolysis (the breakdown of fats and other lipids by releasing fatty acids into the blood) both during and following exercise, regulating insulin secretion, and reducing appetite. (13)
From the overall analysis, the niacin group showed a significant increase in both IIEF-Q3 scores (0.53 ± 1.18, P < 0.001) and IIEF-Q4 scores (0.35 ± 1.17, P = 0.013) compared with baseline values. The placebo group also showed a significant increase in IIEF-Q3 scores (0.30 ± 1.16, P = 0.040) but not IIEF-Q4 scores (0.24 ± 1.13, P = 0.084). However, when patients were stratified according to the baseline severity of ED, the patients with moderate and severe ED who received niacin showed a significant improvement in IIEF-Q3 scores (0.56 ± 0.96 [P = 0.037] and 1.03 ± 1.20 [P < 0.001], respectively) and IIEF-Q4 scores (0.56 ± 1.03 [P = 0.048] and 0.84 ± 1.05 [P < 0.001], respectively] compared with baseline values, but not for the placebo group. The improvement in IIEF-EF domain score for severe and moderate ED patients in the niacin group were 5.28 ± 5.94 (P < 0.001) and 3.31 ± 4.54 (P = 0.014) and in the placebo group were 2.65 ± 5.63 (P < 0.041) and 2.74 ± 5.59 (P = 0.027), respectively. There was no significant improvement in erectile function for patients with mild and mild-to-moderate ED for both groups. For patients not receiving statins treatment, there was a significant improvement in IIEF-Q3 scores (0.47 ± 1.16 [P = 0.004]) for the niacin group, but not for the placebo group.
Intermountain Healthcare is a Utah-based, not-for-profit system of 23 hospitals, a Medical Group with more than 1,600 physicians and advanced practice clinicians at about 180 clinics, a health plans division called SelectHealth, and other health services. Helping people live the healthiest lives possible, Intermountain is widely recognized as a leader in clinical quality improvement and in efficient healthcare delivery.
Zinc is a trace metallic element that occurs naturally in the earth. Certain vegetables, meats, and seafood have more zinc content than others. This makes it fairly easy to obtain zinc through a varied diet. An extreme zinc deficiency is rare in the United States, as most people get some zinc through the foods that they eat. However, when levels of zinc fall below the recommended threshold, problems begin.
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