So what causes erectile dysfunction?  Sometimes it is a circulation problem.  Sometimes it is a low testosterone issue.  Sometimes it is not.  Testosterone (T) supplementation can help ED and low libido in cases of low T and even if there is a normal T level at baseline, ED can be helped.  In cases where thyroid under or overactivity is causing T levels to be less than optimal.  Aging is also a problem as T levels drop after mid 20’s and as adipose tissue increases and aromatase enzyme conversion of T to Estrogen correspondingly increases.  This causes an unfavorable E:T ratio which equates to low T.
Taking high doses can also cause other severe problems, including difficulty breathing, paralysis, very low blood pressure, heart problems, and death. After taking a one-day dose of yohimbine, one person reported an allergic reaction involving fever; chills; listlessness; itchy, scaly skin; progressive kidney failure; and symptoms that looked like the auto-immune disease called lupus.

Talk with your doctor about going to a counselor if psychological or emotional issues are affecting your ED. A counselor can teach you how to lower your anxiety or stress related to sex. Your counselor may suggest that you bring your partner to counseling sessions to learn how to support you. As you work on relieving your anxiety or stress, a doctor can focus on treating the physical causes of ED.
But, first for those of you who do not know anything on this topic, let’s define erectile dysfunction. Erectile dysfunction is a condition which characterizes itself with the inability to maintain an erection during sexual intercourse. Luckily, although erectile dysfunction is a common condition, this condition seems to be easily treated. You can choose from the variety of natural remedies, including supplements, which claim to increase your stamina, sexual ability, and muscle mass. This article is dedicated to the importance of exercise as a way to treat erectile dysfunction and highlight the best exercises you could use as a part of the treatment. 
In addition, statins had a relatively fast effect on the problem of erectile dysfunction as compared to its role in the reduction of cholesterol, which suggest that Niacin drugs were reaching to deal with root inflammation of the mentioned problems significantly. According to the researcher Howard Hermann, Men consuming Niacin scored better on both self-reported tests associated with the function of erectile and the levels of lipids in blood.

If you have symptoms of ED, it’s important to check with your doctor before trying any treatments on your own. This is because ED can be a sign of other health problems. For instance, heart disease or high cholesterol could cause ED symptoms. With a diagnosis, your doctor could recommend a number of steps that would likely improve both your heart health and your ED. These steps include lowering your cholesterol, reducing your weight, or taking medications to unclog your blood vessels.


There’s much evidence to suggest that Yohimbine does have a positive effect in men who have erectile dysfunction. Initially, it was considered a failure as a treatment because it doesn’t increase levels of testosterone in the body, the hormone needed for erections. However, recent trials have shown that it works well to increase arousal, help blood flow to the penis, and as a general stimulant.
How it works: Rhodiola works in supporting our adrenal glands by preventing the breakdown of too much dopamine and serotonin during stressful times, leaving enough for us to remain buoyant and energized. What’s extra fun about Rhodiola is that it works fast – in 30 minutes – to change your energy levels and focus – so pop one before you think you want to get frisky.
Because cholesterol is a building block for testosterone, drugs that interfere with cholesterol production can lower levels of this hormone (Journal of Sexual Medicine, April, 2010). French and Dutch researchers have reported that decreased libido and erectile dysfunction may be associated with statin-type drugs (British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, Sept. 2004; Drug Safety, July, 2009).
medicines called alpha-blockers such as Hytrin (terazosin
HCl), Flomax (tamsulosin HCl), Cardura (doxazosin
mesylate), Minipress (prazosin HCl), Uroxatral (alfuzosin HCl),
 Jalyn (dutasteride and tamsulosin HCl), or Rapaflo (silodosin).
Alpha-blockers are sometimes prescribed for prostate
problems or high blood pressure. In some patients, the use
of Sildenafil with alpha-blockers can lead to a drop in blood pressure or to fainting
Data from the Florida Sexual History Questionnaire collected at each time period (baseline, 5.4 mg tid and 10.8 mg tid) are presented in Table 6. Three patients (two responders and one nonresponder) did not complete the entire questionnaire for each study period and were excluded from the analyses. Thus, data in the table and statistical analyses are based on the responses of seven responders and eight nonresponders.

Response to yohimbine was not dependent on patient age. Patients who showed a positive response had fewer medical risk factors overall, although the small number of patients was not large enough to provide statistical significance. The positive clinical response was verified subjectively both by the formal questionnaire and by the in-office clinical encounter. The positive response was verified objectively by measuring nocturnal penile tumescence and rigidity with the RigiScan™ home monitor. The trend of the baseline penile erectile response was better in the responders, suggesting that use of yohimbine might be more effective in patients who have less severe erectile dysfunction. Some authors have questioned the effect of yohimbine on penile activity, but either inadequate doses of yohimbine were used or only tumescence was measured,21,32 often in an office setting where anxiety and embarrassment might affect results.
Anxiety. There is mixed evidence about the effectiveness of yohimbine, the active ingredient in yohimbe, for treating anxiety related to phobias. Some research suggests that it does not improve anxiety when combined with exposure-based therapy used to reduce fear of flying. However, other research suggests that taking yohimbine along with exposure-based therapy helps treat claustrophobia better than exposure-based therapy alone. The effect of yohimbe bark on anxiety is not clear.
Athletes or dieters sometimes use products containing yohimbe to help promote easier weight loss, especially from body fat, and to increase energy expenditure. Some have speculated that it may help increase muscle mass and endurance while cutting fat. But there’s not much evidence from studies that this is necessarily true. Yohimbe does seem to have potential to increase energy expenditure by acting as a stimulant, increasing adrenaline levels in the body and potentially preventing fatigue during or following exercise.
Yohimbe bark is an herbal supplement. Its species name is Pausinystalia yohimbe. Yohimbe comes from the bark of the evergreen Corynanthe yohimbe tree, which is in the plant family called Rubiaceae. The active ingredient in yohimbe, called yohimbine, is also used to make certain medications. Civilizations in Western Africa have used it for centuries. Today it’s studied for its ability to help treat conditions including erectile dysfunction/impotence, diabetes, depression, hypotension, and overuse of certain medications.
Research in the medical journal Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine found that supplementing with the mineral zinc, along with the vitamins folic acid and biotin, as well as the herb Rhodiola rosea improved ejaculatory control in males suffering from premature ejaculation. Premature ejaculation is a common type of sexual dysfunction that affects 20 to 30 percent of men between the ages of 18 and 55. The low incidence of any side-effects of these natural treatments may also make it preferable to drug treatments by many men.
Dr. Niket Sonpal is the Associate Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency at Brookdale Hospital Medical Center in Brooklyn and an Associate Professor at Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine. He's a practicing Gastroenterologist and Hepatologist with a focus on Men's and Women's Health, and a regular contributor to Women's health, Shape and Prevention Magazine.
Does diabetes cause erectile dysfunction? Diabetes can lead to lower levels of testosterone, and this can result in erectile dysfunction. Controlling blood sugar levels, maintaining a healthy weight, getting exercise, and reducing stress are all ways of reducing this problem. Hormone therapy, Viagra, and counseling are some ways that medicine can help. Read now
One of the main actions of yohimbe bark is alpha-2 antagonism (this is why it’s also sometimes called an “alpha-2 blocker”). This means that it can impact sympathetic nervous system activity and increase the release of adrenaline (or noradrenaline). This is because it blocks alpha-2 receptors in the brain stem. (4) Other types of alpha-2 agonists medications work in a similar way. They affect the central nervous system by altering release of certain neurotransmitters and dilating blood vessels. This increases alertness, circulation and other physiological processes.
In the Hong Kong study, the researchers postulated that niacin might be as beneficial as statins on erectile function, and have other related benefits too. Niacin is known to produce a flushing effect (see “Toleration Despite Adversity,” above), which is related to prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) release in the skin. This can lead to vasodilation and concomitant flushing. The production of PGD2 can also occur in macrophages, a type of protective white blood cell. Consequently, when PGD2 production is induced by niacin, it may affect all body tissue, including the cavernosal tissue in the penis. Indeed, PGD2 is one of the potential agents causing the vasodilation and engorgement of cavernosal tissue, thereby leading to erection. Thus, niacin improves erectile function by stimulating the production of PGD2.
MEDLINE is the U.S. National Library of Medicine's (NLM) premier bibliographic database that contains over 18 million references to journal articles in life sciences with a concentration on biomedicine. A distinctive feature of MEDLINE is that the records are indexed with NLM Medical Subject Headings (MeSH).The great majority of journals are selected for MEDLINE based on the recommendation of the Literature Selection Technical Review Committee (LSTRC), a National Institute of Health (NIH)-chartered advisory committee of external experts analogous to the committees that review NIH grant applications. MEDLINE is the primary component of PubMed, part of the entry series of databases provided by the NLM National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). MEDLINE may also be searched via the NLM Gateway (23).
Zinc therapy (5 mg/day) improves sexual competence by increasing penile thrusting and prolonging ejaculatory latency without disturbing arousability and motivation of male rats. Increase in the T levels observed with zinc supplementation is beneficial in this regard. However, increase in PRL is responsible for the reduced libido index. Further studies on pigs and monkeys are needed to evaluate the possible therapeutic use of zinc in sexual dysfunction.

There is no guaranteed, permanent way to ‘cure’ ED – partly because, age is a factor that affects ED the older you are, the more likely you are to get ED symptoms. This might mean that even if you have successfully kept your erectile dysfunction under control in the past, you may get ED symptoms again as you get older. Also, there are lots of factors that cause ED. So, one factor that doesn’t affect you right now might do in the future. 
The vitamin-deficiency disease pellagra was first identified in 1735 by Spanish physician Gaspar Casal. Considered to be Spain’s first epidemiologist, Casal is famous for his clarity and independence of thought, along with his conceptual change in the approach to medicine. Instead of mere observation and reporting, Casal moved to a fact-based induction methodology, presaging the work of John Stuart Mill, the political philosopher, economist, and logician, one hundred years earlier.
Two years ago I took regular Niacine for about a year to lower LDL and increase HDL. I did not want to take Statins because of its side effects. I was being monitored by my Dr. because of the effect on liver enzymes. I took 1.5 gr together with Phytosterols. The treatment was effective and the only side effect were the flushes which I found could be eliminated by having 500 mg at the end of each of the 3 main meals. I stopped treatment for a year or so, but now the Dr. suggested I start taking Niacine. or Statins. I chose Niacine (Nicotine Acid) and started with 500 mgs for 3 days; increased it to 1000 mgs. for 4 more days, until I increased it to 500 mgs x 3 for a total of 1.5 grms/day taking 500 mgms/meal. I started noticing my gradual decrease in libido this time almost inmediately. I do not take any other medicines as such I'm definitely inclined to blame Niacine because I have taken Phytosterols for 3 years and my libido was fine. I'm a senior. Hope this will help!
I use magnesium and zinc. I don’t find any difference with zinc but about 10 minutes after I pop a magnesium I’m all ready to go! But diet comes first! I went vegan about 10 weeks ago (and I’ll never look back) but I also quit my hormonal birth control about 3 weeks ago so my sex drive is at a big fat ZERO. But like I said, when I take a magnesium it still manages to come back. Mine you, I have a boyfriend who I’ve been with for 4 and a half years and I have so much love for him! But I wanna feel sexy everyday! I am losing weight so that will help and I’ve heard amazing things about Pine Pollen (tinture for men and powder for women) check it out! 🙂
In the United States, certain prescription drugs containing yohimbine have been approved since the 1980s. They are labeled Yohimbine hydrochloride (which go by the brand names Aphrodyne or Yocon). Yohimbine medications are prescribed most commonly to treat sexual dysfunction in both men and women caused by a number of factors like aging, hormonal imbalances or side effects of medications.
1. Increased Blood Flow in Men with Lower Niacin Levels.  Of course, there is a lot to an erection, but I think just about everyone would agree that the #1 goal is to increase something called endothelial function.  The endothelium is the delicate lining of the arteries that pumps out nitric oxide and relaxes the arteries.  And, of course, a relaxed, i.e. more open artery is one that allows more blood to flow into your arm, your leg or your brain.  And I'm sure I don't need to explain why increased blood flow into your penile arteries is critical for erectile strength.
3. Men With Bad Lipid Readings.  One study examined men with both erectile dysfunction and "dyslipidemia."  Dyslipidemia is medical speak for bad HDL, LDL, triglyceride or some combination of the three.  They gave these men 1.5 grams of niacin, which is a megadosed amount, and is a favorite of Dr. Davis.  (See my  Review of Track Your Plaque for Dr. Davis' approach to plaque regression.) Besides the above listed benefits, niacin will also a) lower triglycerides, b) boost HDL, c) increase particle size and d) decrease LDL particle counts.  All of these are very anti-atherosclerosis and great for your arteries. 

Adequate daily magnesium intake is slightly lower for younger men than for those in their 30s and older. The University of Maryland Medical Center recommends 400 mg daily for men between the ages of 19 and 30, and 420 mg per day for men 31 and older. While these levels are a good general guideline, you should check with your doctor to determine the proper dosage for a daily magnesium supplement, particularly if you’re using magnesium to help treat or prevent erectile problems.
It is important that you exercise, not only to combat ED but also to maintain your general health. Any aerobic exercise such as running, cycling or swimming will be great for improving your overall health and fitness. These kinds of exercise improves your cardiovascular health, which is important to help you treat your ED. You may also find it helpful to review your general lifestyle and reduce factors which could be contributing to your ED, such as smoking, drinking alcohol and eating unhealthy foods.
Though higher doses of zinc reduce libido, supplementation with a medium dose (5 mg/day) has some beneficial effect on the sexual competence of adult male rats. The major significant effects of this dose of zinc are prolongation of ejaculatory latency without disturbing sexual arousability, motivation, penile erection and sex vigor. Also, the partner preference index of the 5 mg/day group was positive and comparable to the controls. A positive partner preference index is indicative of unchanged sexual interest of males.[16] These results confirmed that libido and sexual interest are not affected by zinc supplementation with a 5 mg/day dose. However, mild reduction in percentage of intromission was observed in this group and it is postulated that this may be situational rather than an effect of supplemented zinc. This is based on our observation where mild rejection by the females at the initial phase of the behavior led some males to refrain from sexual activity.
A mineral involved in muscle development, muscle is essential for reproductive function in men of every age and activity level. One study that compared athletes to non-active individuals found that supplementing with 22 mg magnesium per pound of body weight of the course of four weeks raised testosterone levels in both groups. And two separate studies, one on a group of men over the age of 65 and a second on a younger 18-30-year-old cohort, present the same conclusion: levels of testosterone (and muscle strength) are directly correlated to the levels of magnesium in the body. These are the best foods for magnesium!
"Sexual relations are not only an important part of people's wellbeing. From a clinical point of view, the inability of some men to perform sexually can also be linked to a range of other health problems, many of which can be debilitating or potentially fatal," says Professor Gary Wittert, Head of the Discipline of Medicine at the University of Adelaide and Director of the University's Freemasons Foundation Centre for Men's Health.
There is no guaranteed, permanent way to ‘cure’ ED – partly because, age is a factor that affects ED the older you are, the more likely you are to get ED symptoms. This might mean that even if you have successfully kept your erectile dysfunction under control in the past, you may get ED symptoms again as you get older. Also, there are lots of factors that cause ED. So, one factor that doesn’t affect you right now might do in the future. 
Dr. Niket Sonpal is the Associate Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency at Brookdale Hospital Medical Center in Brooklyn and an Associate Professor at Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine. He's a practicing Gastroenterologist and Hepatologist with a focus on Men's and Women's Health, and a regular contributor to Women's health, Shape and Prevention Magazine.
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