People who do not have any contra-indications (see below) generally tolerate it well. However, taking yohimbe can sometimes cause side effects including: high blood pressure, headaches, anxiety, restlessness/nervousness, dizziness or shakiness. These side effects seem to affect people with a history of mental illness or mood-related problems most often. But it’s possible for them to develop in anybody.
Yohimbe is usually taken orally, but it may also be administered intravenously for certain cases. Weight is also sometimes used as a guide to determine the dosage of this supplement. A 150-pound (lb.) person should take roughly 14 mg of yohimbe per day, while those who weigh 200 lbs. and 250 lbs. should take around 18 mg and 22 mg yohimbe, respectively.

The search criteria identified 210 studies from 1972 to 2010; on inserting randomized controlled trials only 26 studies were identified out of which only 5 met the inclusion criteria and 21 studies did not meet the inclusion criteria, hence, were excluded. Five (18, 24–27) randomized controlled trials (RCTs) met the inclusion criteria; studies involved the use of aerobic exercise in the management of ED, the IIEF was the assessment tool for ED and also involved control groups. A total of 385 subjects were involved: Lamina et al (25), n=43; Lamina et al (26), n=43; Esposito et al (18), n= 110; Kalka et al (27), n= 129; Maio, Saraed and Marchiori (24), n= 60.
Science is always on the search for the magic bullet for our sexual health problems – that female Viagra. Most women, however, experience poor sexual desire alongside other issues like PMS and fatigue. The solution requires a holistic approach. I want women to start by feeling good every day, in everything they do, as it’s then that you will find you have the ability to feel great about sex.
Depending on dosage, yohimbine can either increase or decrease blood pressure Small doses can increase blood pressure. Higher doses can lead to a potentially dangerous drop in blood pressure. Higher doses of oral yohimbine may have numerous side effects, such as rapid heart rate, overstimulation, unusual blood pressure, cold sweating, and insomnia.
Various hormone levels were monitored during therapy, and it did not appear that there were major changes in the group as a whole (Table 2). Cortisol levels rose significantly from baseline to the first dose of yohimbine. When the hormone levels were evaluated in responders vs nonresponders (Table 3), slight differences were noted. Free testosterone levels were higher at baseline in the responders but did not increase significantly with the higher doses of yohimbine. Dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels were not significantly higher at baseline in the responders, and they did not change with the higher dose of yohimbine. Cortisol levels appeared to increase in both groups with increased doses of yohimbine, significantly more so in responders than in nonresponders (P=0.03).
Some medical self-help books make niacin sound like a panacea for health-conscious people with rising cholesterol levels and shrinking budgets. Because this B vitamin is cheap and sold over-the-counter at drug and health food stores, people see no reason to check with the doctor before tossing back a handful of pills. What they may not know is that the high doses (1,500-3,000 mg) needed to lower cholesterol levels can cause serious complications. (As a dietary supplement, 10-20 mg is usually recommended). To add to the confusion, niacin comes in two forms: immediate- and sustained-release preparations.
Yohimbe is an evergreen tree with large, leathery leaves. It is native to the tropical west coast of Africa, from Nigeria to Gabon. Natives in that region have used the inner bark of Yohimbe to treat angina, hypertension, fever, cough and leprosy. It was also smoked or snuffed to attain an altered state of consciousness. Its main use and rumored “power” was that it was an aphrodisiac. Today science recognizes it as a sensual stimulant, but Native Africans also recognized that drinking Yohimbe tea encouraged sexual arousal. It was traded with Europeans and the tales of Yohimbe’s “powers” spread, giving rise for its increased demand by Europeans.

That’s no joke. Like every part of the body, the male repro system needs the right nutrients for optimal health, from function to fertility. Studies have isolated several nutrients that are particularly beneficial. You can get them through these best foods for your penis, or these best proteins for your penis, but we’ve broken them down here by nutrient in case you want to ensure you’re getting enough. (And if you do decide to go the supplement route, as always, talk to your doctor and never exceed recommended dosages.)


Reduction of the libido index was the major disadvantage that we observed with zinc supplementation. Substances that affect libido usually act centrally and may reduce desire by causing sedation or hormonal disturbances.[17] The role of elevated levels of PRL in serum as an inhibitor of sexual drive and gonadal function is well established.[18] This reduction of sex drive may occur through the modification of activity of dopaminergic neurons in the CNS that are regarded as controlling sexual motivation and function.[19] Our study demonstrated a significant increase of serum PRL level (2.9 to 7.22 ng/dl) within two weeks of supplementation of zinc (5 mg/day). This is a possible explanation for the reduced libido with increasing doses of zinc observed in this study.
Practicing natural health and herbalism for over 18 years, Dalene received her training and herbal certification under the guidance of Lynn Albers at Yarmony Mt. Herbal College in Colorado in 2000. She went on to become a Certified Birth Doula at Birthingway College of Midwifery in Portland, Oregon in 2007. As a Birth Doula, Dalene has helped to bring many new lives in to this world. Dalene has written 280+ fertility articles and with her vast array of herbal and holistic healing knowledge has helped 1000’s of women on their journey to Motherhood.
In the New World, maize was traditionally treated with lime, an alkali now shown to make niacin nutritionally available and thereby reducing the chance of developing pellagra.1 However, when in the 18th century corn cultivation was adopted worldwide, treatment with lime was not accepted because the benefit was not understood. Thus in the New World, often heavily dependent on corn, cultivators rarely suffered from pellagra, which became common only when corn became a staple that was eaten without the traditional treatment. Of interest, if maize is not so processed, it is a poor source of tryptophan as well as niacin.
Studies of mixed organic causes for erectile dysfunction showed varied results;15,16 thus, certain guidelines recommended that it not be used to treat erectile dysfunction.17 Side effects occurred when a high dose was given.18 Patients with organic erectile dysfunction had mixed results, with positive effects in 26,19 33,20 3421 and 43%,22 respectively. The results were better when the dose was doubled.20,21 Several meta-analyses showed a slight positive effect of yohimbine compared with placebo.23,24

After two hours of zinc treatment, male rats were individually caged and kept for 15 minutes for adaptation. One estrous (receptive) and one diestrous (nonreceptive) female were introduced to each cage and the duration of physical contact with each female was recorded for 15 minutes. Partner preference index (PPI) was calculated as the difference between the time spent with estrous female and diestrous female. Positive indices indicate their positive sexual interest.[12]
Because the study included only subjects with dyslipidemia, the results may not be applicable to those with ED who have a normal serum lipid profile. Furthermore, patients using aspirin or NSAIDs were excluded to avoid the effect of these drugs in inhibiting prostaglandin D production, which may be one of the potential mechanisms for the effects of niacin on ED. It should be noted that it is quite common for ED patients to have coexisting cardiovascular disease that requires the use of aspirin. Therefore, further study on the interaction of aspirin and niacin in ED patients may be needed to establish the role of niacin in clinical usage.

For men who do find themselves suffering from ED, the knee-jerk reaction can be to reach for the Viagra but – while ED tablets are an excellent solution in the short term – there are other treatment options to consider incorporating into your lifestyle on a long-term basis, one of the most straightforward being exercise. Below you’ll find four great ways that exercise may help to treat erectile dysfunction.
Latest research studies highlighted that a daily dose of Vitamin B3 or Niacin brings a drastic improvement in the erectile function of men dealing with the problem of high cholesterol. This result reveals that about 80 men, who consumed Niacin and started the study with either moderate or severe level of erectile dysfunction highlighted a significant improvement in the ability of maintaining an erection.
Antioxidants  boost nitric oxide production and prevent NO breakdown. Ascorbic acid has direct effects on the bioactivity of NO, and augments NO production in a variety of body processes. The effects are actually synergistic with Vitamin E. Both vitamins are not usually measured, and a reasonable dose of Vitamin C is 500 to 1,000 mg daily. Vitamin E supplementation should be limited to <400 IU per day because of potential adverse long-term health effects of higher doses.

Because the study included only subjects with dyslipidemia, the results may not be applicable to those with ED who have a normal serum lipid profile. Furthermore, patients using aspirin or NSAIDs were excluded to avoid the effect of these drugs in inhibiting prostaglandin D production, which may be one of the potential mechanisms for the effects of niacin on ED. It should be noted that it is quite common for ED patients to have coexisting cardiovascular disease that requires the use of aspirin. Therefore, further study on the interaction of aspirin and niacin in ED patients may be needed to establish the role of niacin in clinical usage.

Yohimbine has had questionable effects in men with organic erectile dysfunction. We conducted this study to better define the population of men responsive to yohimbine, because tobacco was thought to affect a regimen of yohimbine more than other risk factors. We measured nocturnal penile tumescence with the RigiScan™ monitor, hormone profiles, answers to the Florida Sexual Health Questionnaire, and clinical responses at baseline and after two different doses of yohimbine in 18 nonsmoking men with erectile dysfunction. Of the 18 men, nine (50%) were successful in completing intercourse in more than 75% of attempts. The yohimbine responders were men with less severe erectile dysfunction as manifested by improved increased rigidity on RigiScan™ testing, higher Florida Sexual Health Questionnaire scores, and slightly higher levels of serum testosterone. Yohimbine is an effective therapy to treat organic erectile dysfunction in some men with erectile dysfunction.
There is no evidence that mild or even moderate alcohol consumption is bad for erectile function, says Ira Sharlip, MD, a urology professor at the University of California San Francisco School of Medicine. But chronic heavy drinking can cause liver damage, nerve damage, and other conditions -- such as interfering with the normal balance of male sex hormone levels -- that can lead to ED.
If ED continues to be a problem even after making certain lifestyle changes, talk with your doctor. ED is an uncomfortable subject for many men to discuss, but it’s treatable in most cases, so there’s no reason to avoid getting help. Doctors see patients every day about ED, so you’re simply one of millions of men dealing with this common condition.
Some medical self-help books make niacin sound like a panacea for health-conscious people with rising cholesterol levels and shrinking budgets. Because this B vitamin is cheap and sold over-the-counter at drug and health food stores, people see no reason to check with the doctor before tossing back a handful of pills. What they may not know is that the high doses (1,500-3,000 mg) needed to lower cholesterol levels can cause serious complications. (As a dietary supplement, 10-20 mg is usually recommended). To add to the confusion, niacin comes in two forms: immediate- and sustained-release preparations.
Dr. Niket Sonpal is the Associate Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency at Brookdale Hospital Medical Center in Brooklyn and an Associate Professor at Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine. He’s a practicing Gastroenterologist and Hepatologist with a focus on Men’s and Women’s Health, and a regular contributor to Women’s health, Shape and Prevention Magazine.
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