Having your current medication checked – if you are taking medication already, it could be that your erection problems are a side effect. Have a doctor check whether this is the cause of your problems and if it is, you might be able to switch medications and then find that your erectile dysfunction goes away completely – or at least improves. Medications that can cause erection problems include:
Vitamin B6 deficiency leads to irritability, numbness in the extremities, muscle weakness, fatigue, drowsiness, impaired mental activity, peripheral neuritis, seborrheic dermatitis, stomatitis, conjunctivitis, and, of course, impairment of sexual potency. Lack of this vitamin can be a result of long-term use of anti-tuberculosis drugs and chronic diseases of the gastrointestinal tract.
Before taking any medication for erectile dysfunction, including over-the-counter supplements and herbal remedies, get your doctor's OK. Medications for erectile dysfunction do not work in all men and might be less effective in certain conditions, such as after prostate surgery or if you have diabetes. Some medications might also be dangerous if you:

Long prescribed for women who want to restore muscle tone after childbirth, pelvic floor exercises, also known as Kegel exercises, can benefit men significantly too. A study by researchers at the University of West of England in Bristol showed that pelvic floor exercises can help men with erectile dysfunction and premature ejaculation. Furthermore, experts think these exercises can make orgasms stronger. Once learned, pelvic floor exercises can be done any time, even while doing other things.

Penile erection is a hemodynamic process involving increased arterial inflow and restricted venous outflow, coordinated with corpus cavernosum and penile arterial smooth muscle relaxation. Any problem in this mechanism results in Erectile Dysfunction and its etiology is generally multifactorial. This study is aimed at determining the objective outcome of aerobic training in the management of Erectile Dysfunction of arterogenic origin using Meta analysis.

Partner preference index in both 5 mg zinc treated group and controls was positive. In the control group, time spent by males, with estrous and diestrous females, was 21.75 sec. (SEM 2.26) and 13.62 sec. (SEM 1.05) respectively. In the zinc treated group they spent 20.87 sec. (2.09 SEM) with estrous and 14.37 sec. (SEM 0.70) with diestrous females. The PPI of controls and zinc treated group was 8.12 Sec. (SEM 2.32) and 6.50 Sec. (SEM 1.76) respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups, P > 0.05.


A study published in the journal Fertility and Sterility that analyzed the effect of various fruit and vegetables on sperm quality discovered carrots had the best all-around results on sperm count and motility—a term used to describe the ability of sperm to swim towards an egg. Men who ate the most carrots saw improved sperm performance by 6.5 to 8 percent. The Harvard researchers attribute the boost to carotenoids, powerful antioxidative compounds in carrots that help the body make vitamin A.
An Italian study in 1994 on 63 patients with psychogenic impotence showed that yohimbine, the active ingredient in the inner bark of the Yohimbe tree, improves libido and sexual stimulation. Half of the patients were given 15mg orally of yohimbine and the antidepressant trazodone 50mg orally per day, the other half a placebo, over an 8-week period. Of the half that received the yohimbine, 71 percent had an increase in sexual desire, erectile function, and ejaculation, as compared with only 22 percent in the placebo group. Patients receiving the placebo then were given the yohimbine tablets over a new 8-week course and of that group, 74 percent showed improvement. After a 3- and 6-month follow-up, positive results were maintained in 58 percent of the patients. To me this is very notable, as the antidepressant trazodone is known to cause sexual dysfunction as a side effect.
The appropriate dose of yohimbe depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for yohimbe. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

A conflicting study of 22 subjects found that a 100mg daily dose of yohimbine for 30 days did not significantly improve penile rigidity. Three subjects experienced a notable increase in penile rigidity and twelve subject experience a partial increase in rigidity. [13] These findings do not completely discount the use of yohimbine to treat erectile dysfunction, but do suggest the compound's effects, even at very high dosages, will cause varying responses across a similar population.

The group treated with the lower concentration of zinc (1 mg/day) did not show an alteration in any of the observed parameters. However, supplementation with a dose of 5 mg/day per rat caused substantial prolonged ejaculatory latency and increased in number of penile thrusting. The other parameters studied remained unchanged indicating uninterrupted libido, sex vigor and performance. Majority of male rats (75 %) showed the prominent actions of sexual behaviour (mount, intromission and penile thrusting) and did not ejaculate within the 15-minute observation period.
E.D. may just be that early warning sign. Erections depend on blood flow, and blood flow depends on nice, wide-open arteries. Atherosclerosis doesn’t just affect the arteries around your heart; if you have plaque build-up, you are likely to have it all around the arterial system — and the penile artery is one of the smallest arteries you have (no matter what you claim about your size). So if you have atherosclerosis, then the plaque there will be one of the first places where you would notice a decline in blood flow.

Researchers in London set out to find out if the claims about Yohimbe were true. Could the bark of a tree actually increase libido and improve impotence? They performed a double-blind trial using yohimbine for the treatment of erection inadequacy. Men, aged 18-70 years, seeking help for the secondary erection inadequacy for 6 months or longer, took part in the trial. None of the participants had any serious psychiatric disease, hypertension or liver insufficiency. Half of the men were given 5.4mg of yohimbine, the other half a placebo, for 8 weeks. Patients were assessed in 4-week intervals. After 8 weeks of treatment, 37 percent said they had good erections, as compared to only 13% in the placebo group. After the 8-week treatment, the placebo group was given the yohimbine as well, results for improved stimulated erection after the second 8-week trial increased to a total of 42 percent overall.

Responders tended to have consistently higher scores compared with nonresponders. For nonresponders, none of the scores was significantly different when comparing baseline scores with either of the yohimbine doses. However, a trend toward an improved total questionnaire score was noted from baseline to the 5.4 mg tid dose (P=0.083). For responders, a significant increase in the Florida Sexual History Questionnaire total score was observed from baseline to the time the 5.4-mg tid dose was administered (P=0.021). A trend closely approaching statistical significance (P=0.055) was noted from baseline to the administration of the 10.8 mg tid dose of yohimbine. Inspection of changes in the individual items revealed that responders reported significantly greater frequency of vaginal penetration with both the 5.4- and 10.8-mg doses of yohimbine tid compared with baseline (P=0.010 and P=0.010, respectively). Participants also noted less difficulty obtaining an erection for sexual intercourse while taking 10.8 mg of the drug compared with baseline (P=0.011). Responders reported having significantly less difficulty maintaining an erection for sexual intercourse compared with baseline with both the 5.4-mg tid dose (P=0.049) and the 10.8-mg tid dose (P<0.001). Responders also reported significantly greater penile firmness and rigidity before intercourse or masturbation in both treatment conditions compared with baseline (P=0.02 for the 5.4-mg tid dose and P=0.013 for the 10.8-mg tid dose).


Those looking to crank up their body's fat-burning to the next level may stack yohimbine HCL with ephedrine HCL and caffeine, creating the ECY stack. Yohimbine is a powerful stimulant that acts on different metabolic pathways compared to caffeine and ephedrine. The most common dosage for each compound in this stack is 5mg of yohimbine HCL, 200mg caffeine, and 25mg ephedrine HCL two to three times per day.
The problem with this though is that there are a lot of websites that are claiming to have a specific exercise technique or perhaps very effective male enhancement products that can guarantee erectile dysfunction. Be careful not to fall for a male enhancement scam. Even though erectile dysfunction may be stressful or difficult to discuss about, there are proven and safe methods that can help you in dealing with it.

Nocturnal penile tumescence and rigidity monitoring using tumescence and rigidity activity units measure the area under the curve of activity divided by the time slept so that varying sleep times may be compared. All four parameters of base and tip tumescence and rigidity rose more in responders than in nonresponders (Table 5). Most changes showed either a trend toward significance or achieved statistical significance. Baseline tip rigidity activity units and tip tumescence activity unit scores differed significantly between groups (P=0.038 and P=0.026, respectively). In fact, nearly all of the baseline values were higher in the responders compared with the nonresponders. Responder tip tumescence activity unit scores increased steadily, whereas nonresponder scores dropped negligibly with the 10.8 mg tid dose. Responders had a significantly higher final score while taking the 10.8-mg dose (P=0.010). Responder tip rigidity activity unit scores also increased steadily, whereas nonresponder scores increased at the second dose, then fell again at the final dose. The mean tip rigidity activity unit score of the responders was significantly higher than that of the nonresponders with the 5.4-mg tid dose (P=0.011). The final scores of the responders were almost twice those of the nonresponders as well (significant where P=0.041). Base rigidity activity unit scores did not differ significantly between the two groups, although the increased responder scores with the initial dose of yohimbine was greater than that of the nonresponders (trend where P=0.065). Finally, base tumescence activity unit scores of the responders who were taking high doses of yohimbine were significantly higher (P=0.009).


In rare cases, the drug Viagra ® can cause blue-green shading to vision that lasts for a short time. In rare cases, the drug Cialis® can cause or increase back pain or aching muscles in the back. In most cases, the side effects are linked to PDE5 inhibitor effects on other tissues in the body, meaning they are working to increase blood flow to your penis and at the same time impacting other vascular tissues in your body. These are not ‘allergic reactions'.
None of the parameters showed a significant difference between controls and the group treated with 1 mg of zinc. The percentage of males who engaged in intromission (% intromitted), was significantly reduced in 10 mg/day zinc group; only three animals showed the particular behavior. Similarly percentage of rats which ended up with ejaculation significantly decreased with the high dose (two out of eight). Libido index of the highest zinc treated group was significantly low compared to controls; (38 % vs. 88 %, P < 0.05). Number of mounts and intromissions was also significantly decreased in the same group; Number of mounts: 1.58 (SEM 3.16) vs. 11.0 (SEM 1.59) and number of intromissions 2.13 (SEM 4.27) vs. 11.0 (SEM 1.59), P < 0.05).
Cavallini, G., Modenini, F., Vitali, G., & Koverech, A. (2005, November). Acetyl-L-carnitine plus propionyl-L-carnitine improve efficacy of sildenafil in treatment of erectile dysfunction after bilateral nerve-sparing radical retropubic prostatectomy. Urology, 66(5), 1080-5. Retrieved from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0090429505006515
In the United States, certain prescription drugs containing yohimbine have been approved since the 1980s. They are labeled Yohimbine hydrochloride (which go by the brand names Aphrodyne or Yocon). Yohimbine medications are prescribed most commonly to treat sexual dysfunction in both men and women caused by a number of factors like aging, hormonal imbalances or side effects of medications.
In the Hong Kong study, the researchers postulated that niacin might be as beneficial as statins on erectile function, and have other related benefits too. Niacin is known to produce a flushing effect (see “Toleration Despite Adversity,” above), which is related to prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) release in the skin. This can lead to vasodilation and concomitant flushing. The production of PGD2 can also occur in macrophages, a type of protective white blood cell. Consequently, when PGD2 production is induced by niacin, it may affect all body tissue, including the cavernosal tissue in the penis. Indeed, PGD2 is one of the potential agents causing the vasodilation and engorgement of cavernosal tissue, thereby leading to erection. Thus, niacin improves erectile function by stimulating the production of PGD2.
A 2011 study of 160 men with moderate or severe erectile dysfunction divided the group in two—80 men were given niacin supplements, and 80 a placebo. The group given niacin reported improved ability to “maintain an erection versus the control group.” It’s not exhaustive research, but still promising. The best part about niacin is that it’s naturally found in foods like turkey, avocado, and peanuts (yum). If you’re not a turkey sandwich fan, you can supplement with a vitamin B complex.
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