Anxiety. There is mixed evidence about the effectiveness of yohimbine, the active ingredient in yohimbe, for treating anxiety related to phobias. Some research suggests that it does not improve anxiety when combined with exposure-based therapy used to reduce fear of flying. However, other research suggests that taking yohimbine along with exposure-based therapy helps treat claustrophobia better than exposure-based therapy alone. The effect of yohimbe bark on anxiety is not clear.


Derived from the bark of a West African evergreen tree, yohimbe was the go-to ‘script for a wonky willy prior to the advent of wonder drugs like Viagra, Walker says. “Yohimbe enhances sexual performance both by blocking certain neurotransmitters in the brain and by increasing the release of nitric oxide in the cavernosal nerves of the penis,” he explains. And it pairs well with other erection-friendly tablets: A 2010 study in the Iranian Journal of Psychiatry found that a combination of yohimbe and L-arginine successfully helps guys get it up. However, yohimbe also has a handful of side effects, including elevated blood pressure and anxiety, so definitely talk to your doctor before you start on the supp.
1. Increased Blood Flow in Men with Lower Niacin Levels.  Of course, there is a lot to an erection, but I think just about everyone would agree that the #1 goal is to increase something called endothelial function.  The endothelium is the delicate lining of the arteries that pumps out nitric oxide and relaxes the arteries.  And, of course, a relaxed, i.e. more open artery is one that allows more blood to flow into your arm, your leg or your brain.  And I'm sure I don't need to explain why increased blood flow into your penile arteries is critical for erectile strength.
Yohimbe is an evergreen tree with large, leathery leaves. It is native to the tropical west coast of Africa, from Nigeria to Gabon. Natives in that region have used the inner bark of Yohimbe to treat angina, hypertension, fever, cough and leprosy. It was also smoked or snuffed to attain an altered state of consciousness. Its main use and rumored “power” was that it was an aphrodisiac. Today science recognizes it as a sensual stimulant, but Native Africans also recognized that drinking Yohimbe tea encouraged sexual arousal. It was traded with Europeans and the tales of Yohimbe’s “powers” spread, giving rise for its increased demand by Europeans.
3. Men With Bad Lipid Readings.  One study examined men with both erectile dysfunction and "dyslipidemia."  Dyslipidemia is medical speak for bad HDL, LDL, triglyceride or some combination of the three.  They gave these men 1.5 grams of niacin, which is a megadosed amount, and is a favorite of Dr. Davis.  (See my  Review of Track Your Plaque for Dr. Davis' approach to plaque regression.) Besides the above listed benefits, niacin will also a) lower triglycerides, b) boost HDL, c) increase particle size and d) decrease LDL particle counts.  All of these are very anti-atherosclerosis and great for your arteries. 
Size matters, so get slim and stay slim. A trim waistline is one good defense — a man with a 42-inch waist is 50% more likely to have ED than one with a 32-inch waist. Losing weight can help fight erectile dysfunction, so getting to a healthy weight and staying there is another good strategy for avoiding or fixing ED. Obesity raises risks for vascular disease and diabetes, two major causes of ED. And excess fat interferes with several hormones that may be part of the problem as well.
Most human studies completed thus-far examine the impact of oral yohimbine consumption on erectile dysfunction (ED) in males. A meta-analysis of seven randomized, placebo-controlled trials found that yohimbine is significantly more effective in treating ED compared to placebo. [11] These findings did not compare yohimbine to prescription medications like Viagra®, which are designed to treat ED.
Overall, studies have been inconclusive about the aphrodisiac benefits of taking yohimbine supplements. However, most have found it works better than placebos. (7) According to a report published in the Iranian Journal of Psychiatry, a recent analysis of seven trials concluded that between 34–75 percent of men involved in studies experienced favorable results when taking between 5–10 milligrams. (8)
Health benefits and risks of copper Copper is an essential trace mineral that occurs in all body tissues. It is vital for a range of body functions including the production of red blood cells and energy, and the maintenance of nerve cells and the immune system. A copper deficiency can be harmful, but too much can be toxic. Learn more about copper here. Read now
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