Three subsets (eight in each subset) of sexually experienced adult male rats were supplemented with three different oral doses of zinc sulphate (a daily dose of 1 mg, 5 mg and 10 mg respectively) for two weeks. A subset of eight animals without zinc supplementation was used as the control group Sexual behavior was observed by placing them individually in cages with receptive females.
Penile implants - are generally used if physical damage (like an accident) makes the anatomical parts needed for an erection not work. These are inserted by surgery and can provide a permanent treatment choice if others fail to work. The implants can be semi-rigid or inflatable. They can be pretty expensive and are not usually available on the NHS.

Does drinking water improve erectile dysfunction? Erectile dysfunction or ED is a common concern for men. Everyday factors, such as hydration levels, may affect a person's ability to get or maintain an erection. Drinking water may, therefore, help some men with ED. In this article, learn about the link between hydration and ED, and other factors that can cause ED. Read now


Adequate daily magnesium intake is slightly lower for younger men than for those in their 30s and older. The University of Maryland Medical Center recommends 400 mg daily for men between the ages of 19 and 30, and 420 mg per day for men 31 and older. While these levels are a good general guideline, you should check with your doctor to determine the proper dosage for a daily magnesium supplement, particularly if you’re using magnesium to help treat or prevent erectile problems.
Can one of the B vitamins actually improve erectile dysfunction?  The research makes a strong case that Niacin, a.k.a. Vitamin B3, does indeed do just that for a big percentage of men. Of course, this is a inexpensive help to erectile issues, as high niacin foods and supplements are cheap and readily available.  Below I summarize the most prominent human evidence to date that shows which men will likely benefit and why:
There have been only a few  well-controlled studies to test the effects of herbal yohimbe (as opposed to medications) on humans. There’s some evidence that yohimbine has potential to enhance the nitric oxide pathway, helping to bring blood flow to the corpus cavernosum tissue of the penis. It may also stimulate the pelvic nerve ganglia and boost adrenaline supply to nerve endings. It seems to have the most effects overall when combined with other treatments or herbal remedies. (6) One study that evaluated the effects of yohimbe on ED found that those taking the herbal remedy experienced slight benefits compared to a control group that was not taking the supplement.

Alprostadil self-injection. With this method, you use a fine needle to inject alprostadil (Caverject Impulse, Edex) into the base or side of your penis. In some cases, medications generally used for other conditions are used for penile injections on their own or in combination. Examples include papaverine, alprostadil and phentolamine. Often these combination medications are known as bimix (if two medications are included) or trimix (if three are included).
This study was designed to test the hypothesis that hydrochlorothiazide a diuretic used to treat hypertension depletes body zinc and thereby cause sexual dysfunction. Serum zinc and sexual dysfunction were measured in 39 middle aged hypertensive men who had been taking hydrochlorothiazide in average daily doses of between 25 and 50 mg daily for at least six months, and a control group of 27 unmedicated middle aged normotensive men. The medicated group had a higher incidence of sexual dysfunction (56 pc) as compared to 11 pc in the control group. The use of hydrochlorothiazide did affect serum zinc levels significantly in 20 patients. Sexual dysfunction occurred more often in older and overweight patients (p < 0.004). Three of the normotensive men experienced sexual dysfunction probably related to old age. Twenty two of the 39 on hydrochlorothiazide and experiencing sexual dysfunction were divided into two groups of 11 patients. Bloods were taken from the 27 normotensive and 22 hypertensive men receiving hydrochlorothiazide for the analyses of zinc. Subsequently one group of the patients were supplemented with zinc 500 mg daily for 30 days while the other group was supplemented with magnesium chloride 1 g daily for 30 days. The normotensive men were not treated. After 30 days, bloods were again taken from the three groups of analyses for zinc and magnesium. Serum zinc was significantly decreased (p < 0.05) by hydrochlorothiazide and a non significant decrease in serum magnesium (p = ns) was observed. After supplementation with zinc, the serum zinc levels returned to normal only in eight patients. There was improvement in the symptoms of sexual dysfunction in five patients. Two patients gained weight. Hydrochlorothiazide decreased serum zinc levels (p < 0.05) and was unchanged with magnesium supplementation but the serum magnesium returned to normal values. Improvement of symptoms of sexual dysfunction was positive in one patient. This study shows that low serum zinc levels may be associated with sexual dysfunction but the definitive role of zinc in the pathogenesis of sexual dysfunction will remain controversial.
It is common for a healthy older man to still want sex and be able to have sex within appropriate limitations. Understanding what is normal in older age is important to avoid frustration and concern. Older men and their partners often value being able to continue sexual activity and there is no age where the man is ‘too old’ to think about getting help with his erection or other sexual problems.
The men started with a daily dose of 500 mg, to make sure they had no adverse side effects, then increased to 1,000 mg and then 1,500 mg. However, Men's Health warns that according to the US's Baylor College of Medicine urologist Larry Lipschultz, not only do niacin supplements often contain less of what the bottle says, "but ED can also be a precursor to heart disease -- a condition you should treat with your doctor's advice."

Once you get checked out for artery blockage and low T, there are things you can do to help treat ED besides taking medications. Yes, Viagra is now available generically (it’s called sildenafil), but it is still expensive, and many men experience side effects, like heart palpitations or blue-ish vision. Here are a few proven natural ways to help improve E.D.
The researchers reasoned from other studies that when the degree of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis are more severe, the effects of niacin and statins as lipid-lowering agents are also more apparent. Their current study seemed to bear this out. Also, in another study assessing the effect of a PDE5 inhibitor in patients using a statin, patients with higher baseline serum LDL-C had better improvement in erectile function after the use of a PDE5 inhibitor. This supports the researchers’ hypothesis that patients with potentially more serious endothelial dysfunction, such as those with higher LDL-C levels, may have better response to the combination usage of a PDE5 inhibitor and niacin.
This study was designed to test the hypothesis that hydrochlorothiazide a diuretic used to treat hypertension depletes body zinc and thereby cause sexual dysfunction. Serum zinc and sexual dysfunction were measured in 39 middle aged hypertensive men who had been taking hydrochlorothiazide in average daily doses of between 25 and 50 mg daily for at least six months, and a control group of 27 unmedicated middle aged normotensive men. The medicated group had a higher incidence of sexual dysfunction (56 pc) as compared to 11 pc in the control group. The use of hydrochlorothiazide did affect serum zinc levels significantly in 20 patients. Sexual dysfunction occurred more often in older and overweight patients (p < 0.004). Three of the normotensive men experienced sexual dysfunction probably related to old age. Twenty two of the 39 on hydrochlorothiazide and experiencing sexual dysfunction were divided into two groups of 11 patients. Bloods were taken from the 27 normotensive and 22 hypertensive men receiving hydrochlorothiazide for the analyses of zinc. Subsequently one group of the patients were supplemented with zinc 500 mg daily for 30 days while the other group was supplemented with magnesium chloride 1 g daily for 30 days. The normotensive men were not treated. After 30 days, bloods were again taken from the three groups of analyses for zinc and magnesium. Serum zinc was significantly decreased (p < 0.05) by hydrochlorothiazide and a non significant decrease in serum magnesium (p = ns) was observed. After supplementation with zinc, the serum zinc levels returned to normal only in eight patients. There was improvement in the symptoms of sexual dysfunction in five patients. Two patients gained weight. Hydrochlorothiazide decreased serum zinc levels (p < 0.05) and was unchanged with magnesium supplementation but the serum magnesium returned to normal values. Improvement of symptoms of sexual dysfunction was positive in one patient. This study shows that low serum zinc levels may be associated with sexual dysfunction but the definitive role of zinc in the pathogenesis of sexual dysfunction will remain controversial.
A 2011 study of 160 men with moderate or severe erectile dysfunction divided the group in two—80 men were given niacin supplements, and 80 a placebo. The group given niacin reported improved ability to “maintain an erection versus the control group.” It’s not exhaustive research, but still promising. The best part about niacin is that it’s naturally found in foods like turkey, avocado, and peanuts (yum). If you’re not a turkey sandwich fan, you can supplement with a vitamin B complex.
When men are given supplemental testosterone it can have positive effects on erectile dysfunction as well as the “grumpy old men” syndrome of low energy, loss of drive, low libido, and loss of endurance as well as “man boobs”.  Zinc has a direct effect on the two main enzyme systems that act on testosterone: conversion of testosterone to estrogen via aromatase and the conversion of testosterone to DHT by 5 alpha reductase.   Zinc blocks the testosterone to estrogen pathway leading to more testosterone.  It turns out that only at really high zinc levels does zinc inhibit the 5 alpha reductase enzyme so when we give mild to moderate zinc supplements, DHT actually increases because there is more testosterone to feed into this pathway.   This actually benefits things because DHT has 2-3 times the times the androgen receptor affinity than testosterone.  In any case, we see an increase of testosterone and androgenic activity from DHT with zinc supplements and whether a guy has low or normal T to begin with, there is a positive change in erectile dysfunction and libido in some men due to the increased androgenic activity and less estrogen pulling in the opposite direction.  Conversely we see testosterone levels drop when a diet is low in Zinc as well as a drop in DHT.  It is important to note that this effect of increased testosterone with zinc supplementation, while well established, does not always lead to an improvement of ED and increased Libido.
Stimulant drugs speed up the nervous system. By speeding up the nervous system, stimulant medications can make you feel jittery and speed up your heartbeat. Yohimbe might also speed up the nervous system. Taking yohimbe along with stimulant drugs might cause serious problems including increased heart rate and high blood pressure. Avoid taking stimulant drugs along with yohimbe.
According to the FDA (Food and Drug Administration), many of these products sold on the internet contain potentially harmful compounds. And they aren’t listed on the label. In an investigation, the FDA found that one-third of these online supplements were laced with undisclosed ingredients. This includes sildenafil—the active ingredient in Viagra. Doctors prescribe Viagra to some patients, but it’s not safe for everyone. The drug could interact with other medications and lower your blood pressure to dangerous levels. This makes ordering supplements online risky. You don’t know whether they contain sildenafil or other ingredients that could harm your health. 
It’s easy to see how erectile dysfunction subsides with exercise. Not only does it help reduce cardiovascular risk factors, but it’s also been shown to reduce stress, another cause of the condition. The best part is that it doesn’t take much effort to get started on an exercise routine. “When it comes to exercise, there is no one-size-fits-all approach,” co-author Dr. Stephen Freedland said in the release. “However, we are confident that even some degree of exercise, even if it’s less intense, is better than no exercise at all.”
Men, aged 40–80 y, were recruited from new consultations seen for erectile dysfunction at the Lahey Clinic Center for Sexual Function. Patients were screened by history and physical examination and by evaluation of nocturnal penile tumescence and rigidity with the RigiScan™ (Timm Medical Technologies, Inc., Minneapolis, USA). Candidates completed a sexual questionnaire and had morning blood tests for luteinizing hormone (LH), free testosterone, cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and androstenedione. Inclusion criteria included normal initial serum testosterone and prolactin levels and the presence of an organic cause of erectile dysfunction manifested by abnormal nocturnal tumescence and rigidity testing with the RigiScan™ monitor. Active smokers and men with concurrent major psychiatric problems were excluded. No other treatment for erectile dysfunction was permitted during the study. Yohimbine hydrochloride (supplied by Palisades Pharmaceuticals, Palisades, NJ, USA) was started at a dose of 5.4 mg three times a day (tid) for 4 weeks, after which the sex questionnaire was administered again and blood tests, nocturnal penile tumescence and rigidity testing were repeated. The dose of yohimbine then was increased to 10.8 mg tid for 4 additional weeks followed by a third administration of the sex questionnaire and final measurements of hormone levels and nocturnal penile tumescence and rigidity monitoring.
There’s much evidence to suggest that Yohimbine does have a positive effect in men who have erectile dysfunction. Initially, it was considered a failure as a treatment because it doesn’t increase levels of testosterone in the body, the hormone needed for erections. However, recent trials have shown that it works well to increase arousal, help blood flow to the penis, and as a general stimulant.
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Two years ago I took regular Niacine for about a year to lower LDL and increase HDL. I did not want to take Statins because of its side effects. I was being monitored by my Dr. because of the effect on liver enzymes. I took 1.5 gr together with Phytosterols. The treatment was effective and the only side effect were the flushes which I found could be eliminated by having 500 mg at the end of each of the 3 main meals. I stopped treatment for a year or so, but now the Dr. suggested I start taking Niacine. or Statins. I chose Niacine (Nicotine Acid) and started with 500 mgs for 3 days; increased it to 1000 mgs. for 4 more days, until I increased it to 500 mgs x 3 for a total of 1.5 grms/day taking 500 mgms/meal. I started noticing my gradual decrease in libido this time almost inmediately. I do not take any other medicines as such I'm definitely inclined to blame Niacine because I have taken Phytosterols for 3 years and my libido was fine. I'm a senior. Hope this will help!

But in this case, zinc is much harder to absorb. This explains a decrease in testosterone levels in vegetarians. Slippery jack mushrooms, button mushrooms, beef liver, and fish are also rich in zinc. They are followed by breadstuffs, egg yolk, rabbit, chicken, beans, tea, and cocoa. In addition, zinc is found in onions, garlic, and rice. And a very small amount of zinc is available in fruits, vegetables, and milk.
These are not currently approved by the FDA for ED management, but they may be offered through research studies (clinical trials). Patients who are interested should discuss the risks and benefits (informed consent) of each, as well as costs before starting any clinical trials. Most therapies not approved by the FDA are not covered by government or private insurance benefits.

I never thought i could smile and be in a happy marriage again if not for the help of Dr salato. I got dr salato on his website https://drsalatosolutionte.wixsite.com/drsalato on the internet and i emailed him, and he got back to me with some encouraging words, he got me some herbs which i took for just 5 days and i began to feel the enlargement of my penis, and without surgery. This went on for a little period of about 14 days and to my surprise my wife keeps screaming that she love my big dick

A study published in the journal Fertility and Sterility that analyzed the effect of various fruit and vegetables on sperm quality discovered carrots had the best all-around results on sperm count and motility—a term used to describe the ability of sperm to swim towards an egg. Men who ate the most carrots saw improved sperm performance by 6.5 to 8 percent. The Harvard researchers attribute the boost to carotenoids, powerful antioxidative compounds in carrots that help the body make vitamin A.
One study found that sticking to a Mediterranean diet rich in virgin olive oil, vegetables, fruits, whole grains, nuts, and fish was associated with a lower risk of ED development and improvement in people who already suffered from ED. There is also some evidence that vegetarian and vegan diets may lower the risk of some types of heart disease, which in turn decreases the likelihood of developing ED.
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ED can be caused by a handful of things, but one thing’s for sure: You need a healthy supply of the neurotransmitter nitric oxide (NO) to get and maintain an erection. NO is produced in nerve tissue and helps jolt your Johnson by relaxing the smooth muscle so blood can fill the penis. After the initial release of NO, your body releases a cascade of chemicals—including more of the neurotransmitter—to help keep you hard and happy, according to a study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Nitric oxide is made internally from L-arginine, which is an amino acid found in red meat, poultry, fish, and dairy products. In other words, L-arginine is the building block for nitric oxide, which is essential for erections. A lack of one can lead to a lack of the other. However, there’s a problem when it comes to treating L-arginine deficiency with supplements.
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