Researchers at Johns Hopkins University last year looked at 3,400 healthy Americans and found that men who were vitamin D deficient were 32% more likely to have trouble getting it up than those with sufficient levels, even after adjusting for other ED risk factors. In fact, the connection is so common, Walker says D levels are something he always checks in ED patients. Why? The sunshine vitamin is crucial for keeping the endothelial cells that line blood vessels healthy. Without enough of the stuff, blood flow is inhibited, affecting everything from your heart to your hard-on.
Kegel exercises benefits a lot of men. In particular, they also help in strengthening the bulbocavernosus muscle. This very important muscle performs three types of roles. One it allows the penis to grow and be engorged with blood during erection. Second, it pumps while ejaculation, and third, it helps in emptying the urethra right after urination.

The sunshine vitamin will brighten things up in the bedroom. In a recent study published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine, Italian researchers found that of 143 men with erectile dysfunction, 80% had less-than-optimal levels of D, and the men with severe ED had, on average, a 24% lower level of D than with a milder condition. They theorize that low levels of D damage blood vessels and lead to a shortage of nitric oxide.
When it comes to boosting sexual performance, many men will walk all over God’s green earth looking for ways to maintain a good sex life. Luckily men, all you have to do is walk — not run — 2 miles a day. This, along with other healthier lifestyle interventions can help obese men reduce their risk of ED, or even “reverse” current impotence, according to a 2005 study. This comes of importance, since maintaining a trim waistline is a good defense for ED, as men with a 42-inch waist are 50 percent more likely to have ED than those with a 32-inch waist. Getting to a healthy weight and maintaining it is a good strategy for preventing and treating ED.
This content is strictly the opinion of Dr. Josh Axe and is for informational and educational purposes only. It is not intended to provide medical advice or to take the place of medical advice or treatment from a personal physician. All readers/viewers of this content are advised to consult their doctors or qualified health professionals regarding specific health questions. Neither Dr. Axe nor the publisher of this content takes responsibility for possible health consequences of any person or persons reading or following the information in this educational content. All viewers of this content, especially those taking prescription or over-the-counter medications, should consult their physicians before beginning any nutrition, supplement or lifestyle program.

Returning to pellagra, Dr. Casal was the first to offer a clinical description of the disease. He called it mal de la rose due to the red rash seen on the hands and feet of sufferers. In fact, his account is now recognized as the first modern pathological description of a syndrome. This was the beginning of a progression of discoveries that led to the isolation of niacin in 1911, and its direct implication as the dietary deficiency factor in pellagra in 1937.
Erectile dysfunction (ED) is one of the most common sexual problems that men deal with. There are a host of different causes of ED that range from nutrient deficiencies to clinical depression. It’s important to talk to a medical professional about ED, in order to determine the cause of the issue before exploring treatment options. That said, erectile dysfunction has been found in recent years to be a symptom of zinc deficiency.
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