From the overall analysis, the niacin group showed a significant increase in both IIEF-Q3 scores (0.53 ± 1.18, P < 0.001) and IIEF-Q4 scores (0.35 ± 1.17, P = 0.013) compared with baseline values. The placebo group also showed a significant increase in IIEF-Q3 scores (0.30 ± 1.16, P = 0.040) but not IIEF-Q4 scores (0.24 ± 1.13, P = 0.084). However, when patients were stratified according to the baseline severity of ED, the patients with moderate and severe ED who received niacin showed a significant improvement in IIEF-Q3 scores (0.56 ± 0.96 [P = 0.037] and 1.03 ± 1.20 [P < 0.001], respectively) and IIEF-Q4 scores (0.56 ± 1.03 [P = 0.048] and 0.84 ± 1.05 [P < 0.001], respectively] compared with baseline values, but not for the placebo group. The improvement in IIEF-EF domain score for severe and moderate ED patients in the niacin group were 5.28 ± 5.94 (P < 0.001) and 3.31 ± 4.54 (P = 0.014) and in the placebo group were 2.65 ± 5.63 (P < 0.041) and 2.74 ± 5.59 (P = 0.027), respectively. There was no significant improvement in erectile function for patients with mild and mild-to-moderate ED for both groups. For patients not receiving statins treatment, there was a significant improvement in IIEF-Q3 scores (0.47 ± 1.16 [P = 0.004]) for the niacin group, but not for the placebo group.
Although not direct proof of cause and effect, the positive results that we report in half of the men in the current study may reinforce our clinical observation with objective RigiScan™ data that use of yohimbine might be associated with better effects in nonsmokers. We30 reported that cessation of smoking may rapidly improve nocturnal erectile activity and found that nicotine was not the noxious agent in our study. We postulated that carbon monoxide might create a hypoxic environment in the penis. This effect probably was mediated through restoration of nitric oxide activity.31
In the end, the data from the Hong Kong study suggest that niacin alone can improve the erectile function of subjects with dyslipidemia suffering from ED. This is the first time this conclusion has appeared in the literature. Once again, the effect of niacin is clinically significant in those with moderate to severe ED. Further, because of the close relationship between ED and dyslipidemia, niacin could prove to be an important therapy for managing both conditions. Who knows? There may even be other benefits. Future studies will further refine the indications and benefits of niacin in patients with ED.

People who do not have any contra-indications (see below) generally tolerate it well. However, taking yohimbe can sometimes cause side effects including: high blood pressure, headaches, anxiety, restlessness/nervousness, dizziness or shakiness. These side effects seem to affect people with a history of mental illness or mood-related problems most often. But it’s possible for them to develop in anybody.
In the analysis of the study, the niacin group showed a significant increase in both IIEF-Q3 scores and IIEF-Q4 scores compared to the initial baseline values. While the placebo group also showed a significant increase in IIEF-Q3 scores (high hopes, no doubt), it did not for IIEF-Q4 scores. In other words, the “placebo effect” did not extend to maintaining erections. Also, when patients were stratified according to the baseline severity of ED, the patients with moderate and severe ED who received niacin showed a significant improvement in IIEF-Q3 scores (0.56 and 1.03, respectively) and IIEF-Q4 scores (0.56 and 0.84, respectively) compared with baseline values. These results were not significantly increased for the placebo group.
A physical exam checks your total health. Examination focusing on your genitals (penis and testicles) is often done to check for ED. Based on your age and risk factors, the exam may also focus on your heart and blood system: heart, peripheral pulses and blood pressure. Based on your age and family history your doctor may do a rectal exam to check the prostate. These tests are not painful. Most patients do not need a lot of testing before starting treatment.
Vitamins and minerals are used in systems all over the body. Everywhere from your cardiovascular to your nervous system. It’s a lot to understand. So to help dispel some of the myths and outlandish claims, we’ll take a look at how five common vitamins and nutrients affect one very specific aspect of men’s health—erections. Turns out, vitamins can do more than just ward off the common cold.
1. Increased Blood Flow in Men with Lower Niacin Levels.  Of course, there is a lot to an erection, but I think just about everyone would agree that the #1 goal is to increase something called endothelial function.  The endothelium is the delicate lining of the arteries that pumps out nitric oxide and relaxes the arteries.  And, of course, a relaxed, i.e. more open artery is one that allows more blood to flow into your arm, your leg or your brain.  And I'm sure I don't need to explain why increased blood flow into your penile arteries is critical for erectile strength.
Athletes or dieters sometimes use products containing yohimbe to help promote easier weight loss, especially from body fat, and to increase energy expenditure. Some have speculated that it may help increase muscle mass and endurance while cutting fat. But there’s not much evidence from studies that this is necessarily true. Yohimbe does seem to have potential to increase energy expenditure by acting as a stimulant, increasing adrenaline levels in the body and potentially preventing fatigue during or following exercise.
For example, contracting your PC muscle at the wrong time during sex can actually cause you to ejaculate early! Specific thoughts and actions are required in order for your brain to respond with the correct muscle program. Learning this doesn't take away from the spontaneity of sex. In contrast, a start to end procedure for sex provides you with the total confidence required to satisfy yourself AND your partner.
These medications don’t work for everyone but they are easy to use and work for around 60% of people who try them. They work by making it easier to get an erection by reducing the effect of (inhibiting) the chemical PDE-5. This chemical is used in the body to make sure there isn’t too much blood in the penis during an erection, but if you have erectile dysfunction then this chemical ends up over-compensating.
While the rationale behind why it would work is airtight, the research on arginine’s actual effect on erectile dysfunction is slim, points out Charles Walker, M.D., assistant professor of urology and cofounder of the Cardiovascular and Sexual Health clinic at Yale University. But given its solid safety profile, minimal side effects, and potential benefit on heart disease, it’s worth a try, he adds, especially when taken in conjunction with other herbs on this list, which studies have shown can be more effective.
L-arginine. L-arginine is an important amino acid that the body needs to build proteins. Because L-arginine has been shown to improve blood flow, some alternative practitioners have recommended that the supplements be used to treat ED. The Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database, which is a reliable authority on alternative medicines, says L-arginine is possibly effective for treating erectile dysfunction. But Harris warns that "although this supplement could improve blood flow, side effects can be dangerous." L-arginine can cause an allergic reaction or worsen asthma in some people; it can also lower blood pressure.
Cai, T., Verze, P., Massenio, P., Tiscione, D., Malossini, G., Cormio, L. ... Mirone, V. (2016, August 12). Rhodiola rosea, folic acid, zinc and biotin (EndEP®) is able to improve ejaculatory control in patients affected by lifelong premature ejaculation: Results from a phase I II study. Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine, 12(4), 2083-2087. Retrieved from https://www.spandidos-publications.com/10.3892/etm.2016.3595
×