Psychosexual Relationship Specialist at End the Problem, Jacqui Olliver is a published author who renews relationships by solving people's emotional and sexual issues. In the past 7 years, she has helped over 1,000 men, women, and couples restore a relaxed, happy, and fulfilling sex life and enhance their overall connection. Click here to check out her programs or to book a complimentary strategy session and start getting real answers to solve the real problems.
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A noticing fact is that each of these men had problems of lipid levels and high levels of cholesterol. According to the author Dr. Chi-Fai in Hong Kong, "Niacin or Vitamin B3 is one among the old erectile dysfunction drugs and medical experts have documented its safety in well manner. Because of this, we should consider it as a simple and an easy way to bring improvements in the men's erectile function."
L-arginine. L-arginine is an important amino acid that the body needs to build proteins. Because L-arginine has been shown to improve blood flow, some alternative practitioners have recommended that the supplements be used to treat ED. The Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database, which is a reliable authority on alternative medicines, says L-arginine is possibly effective for treating erectile dysfunction. But Harris warns that "although this supplement could improve blood flow, side effects can be dangerous." L-arginine can cause an allergic reaction or worsen asthma in some people; it can also lower blood pressure.

Despite the name, horny goat weed actually helps improve your erection, not libido.  Botanically known as epimedium, this herb has been used by the Chinese for centuries to treat, among other things, low libido and erectile dysfunction. “A growing body of research shows that isolated icariin—the extract of epimedium—inhibits the enzyme phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE-5) and significantly increases nitric oxide synthase, helping to improve erectile function,” says Fisch. In fact, this is the same mechanism that Viagra works through (but the herb comes with a way better name).
Two years ago I took regular Niacine for about a year to lower LDL and increase HDL. I did not want to take Statins because of its side effects. I was being monitored by my Dr. because of the effect on liver enzymes. I took 1.5 gr together with Phytosterols. The treatment was effective and the only side effect were the flushes which I found could be eliminated by having 500 mg at the end of each of the 3 main meals. I stopped treatment for a year or so, but now the Dr. suggested I start taking Niacine. or Statins. I chose Niacine (Nicotine Acid) and started with 500 mgs for 3 days; increased it to 1000 mgs. for 4 more days, until I increased it to 500 mgs x 3 for a total of 1.5 grms/day taking 500 mgms/meal. I started noticing my gradual decrease in libido this time almost inmediately. I do not take any other medicines as such I'm definitely inclined to blame Niacine because I have taken Phytosterols for 3 years and my libido was fine. I'm a senior. Hope this will help!
Adequate daily magnesium intake is slightly lower for younger men than for those in their 30s and older. The University of Maryland Medical Center recommends 400 mg daily for men between the ages of 19 and 30, and 420 mg per day for men 31 and older. While these levels are a good general guideline, you should check with your doctor to determine the proper dosage for a daily magnesium supplement, particularly if you’re using magnesium to help treat or prevent erectile problems.

The views expressed in this article intend to highlight alternative studies and induce conversation. They are the views of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of hims, and are for informational purposes only, even if and to the extent that this article features the advice of physicians and medical practitioners. This article is not, nor is it intended to be, a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and should never be relied upon for specific medical advice.
What are the alternatives to viagra? Erectile dysfunction, when a man cannot achieve or maintain an erection, is a common condition that causes much distress. Viagra is just one of several drug treatments that can help relieve the problem. Other methods and treatments can help, too, including alternative herbal remedies that people may wish to try. Read now
Yohimbine also helps to increase levels of the coenzyme NAD (or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide). This affects metabolism, cognitive processes, and detoxification of drugs in the body. NAD is not currently used to treat cognitive or mood-related disorders on its own, but has been shown in some studies to potentially have uses for preventing neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson’s disease or Alzheimer’s. However on the other hand, studies have found that because it can increase anxiety in some patients, yohimbine may actually worsen mental illness in some patients, including those with Parkinson’s. (15) For this reason, it’s important for anyone taking mood-altering medications, or who has a history of any cognitive or mood disorder, to work with a professional while taking or starting any new herbal treatments.
Erectile dysfunction can occur as a side effect of medication taken for another health condition. Common culprits are high blood pressure meds, antidepressants, some diuretics, beta-blockers, heart medication, cholesterol meds, antipsychotic drugs, hormone drugs, corticosteroids, chemotherapy, and medication for male pattern baldness, among others.
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I was impressed with the questionnaire to make sure the meds I requested were right for me and the follow up email from the prescribing doctor to see if I needed any support. The meds came promptly, were well packaged and are comfortably in date - I thought they might be very near their sell by date but I was wrong to be suspicious. If I ever need this service again I wouldn't hesitate.
A study in the Journal of Sexual Medicine found that a large percentage of men with ED also have low levels of vitamin D. If you’re experiencing ED, you may want to have your level of vitamin D checked. Other symptoms of a low vitamin D level may be too subtle to notice. However, if you have serious vitamin D deficiency, you may have bone pain or muscle weakness. Vitamin D levels can be checked with a simple blood test and for most people corrected with a supplement.

Because cholesterol is a building block for testosterone, drugs that interfere with cholesterol production can lower levels of this hormone (Journal of Sexual Medicine, April, 2010). French and Dutch researchers have reported that decreased libido and erectile dysfunction may be associated with statin-type drugs (British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, Sept. 2004; Drug Safety, July, 2009).
Some medications that are changed by the liver include amitriptyline (Elavil), clozapine (Clozaril), codeine, desipramine (Norpramin), dextromethorphan, donepezil (Aricept), fentanyl (Duragesic), flecainide (Tambocor), fluoxetine (Prozac), meperidine (Demerol), methadone (Dolophine), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL), olanzapine (Zyprexa), ondansetron (Zofran), tramadol (Ultram), trazodone (Desyrel), and others.
On the other hand, high zinc levels have negative effects on sperm quality. Excessive zinc intake in mice have indicated a negative effect of increasing doses of zinc on sperm count and motility.[5] Although there have been studies focusing on various aspects of zinc related reproductive functions, studies on zinc related sexual behavioral aspects have received scant attention. In one study, intranasal irrigation with zinc sulphate has been reported to completely abolish the sexual behavior of male rats.[6]
There have been some studies to suggest that a placebo effect that improves ED may work for some men. One study found that men taking an oral placebo pill showed as much improvement in ED symptoms as men who took actual medication to improve ED. Conversely, men who were given therapeutic suggestions to improve ED did not see signs of symptom improvement.
MEDLINE is the U.S. National Library of Medicine's (NLM) premier bibliographic database that contains over 18 million references to journal articles in life sciences with a concentration on biomedicine. A distinctive feature of MEDLINE is that the records are indexed with NLM Medical Subject Headings (MeSH).The great majority of journals are selected for MEDLINE based on the recommendation of the Literature Selection Technical Review Committee (LSTRC), a National Institute of Health (NIH)-chartered advisory committee of external experts analogous to the committees that review NIH grant applications. MEDLINE is the primary component of PubMed, part of the entry series of databases provided by the NLM National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). MEDLINE may also be searched via the NLM Gateway (23).
The human body only contains 2 or 3 grams of zinc at any given time. Zinc is distributed throughout the body in organs, blood, and bones. It can be difficult to diagnose zinc deficiency. While a low blood zinc level does indicate a deficiency, a normal blood level does not necessarily indicate the absence of a deficiency. And examination of the hair for zinc or a zinc taste test (ZTT) may also be used for supportive evidence in the diagnosis of zinc deficiency.
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