Instead of injecting a medicine, some men insert a suppository of alprostadil into the urethra. A suppository is a solid piece of medicine that you insert into your body where it dissolves. A health care professional will prescribe a prefilled applicator for you to insert the pellet about an inch into your urethra. An erection will begin within 8 to 10 minutes and may last 30 to 60 minutes.

Much of the evidence shows high rates of vitamin D deficiency in patients with erectile dysfunction. In fact, one study of 3,400 participants found that men with vitamin D deficiency were 32% more likely to have trouble with erections when all other risk factors were controlled for. It’s a little on the nose that you need vitamin D for your “D,” but hey—science can be funny too.
Prostate problems are most common in older men, but it’s never too early to start looking after your prostate! Problems such as BPH (enlarged prostate) and prostatitis can cause unpleasant symptoms such as frequent urination, weak urine stream, difficulty urinating and sudden urges to urinate, which can really get in the way of daily life and interrupt sleep.
After two hours of zinc treatment, male rats were individually caged and kept for 15 minutes for adaptation. One estrous (receptive) and one diestrous (nonreceptive) female were introduced to each cage and the duration of physical contact with each female was recorded for 15 minutes. Partner preference index (PPI) was calculated as the difference between the time spent with estrous female and diestrous female. Positive indices indicate their positive sexual interest.[12]
Selenium, found in Brazil nuts, liver and oysters, is a trace mineral that plays an important role in hormone health. You only need a tiny bit for healthy sperm, but a tiny deficiency can be catastrophic for reproductive health. In one study, men who had lower testosterone and were infertile also had significantly lower selenium levels than the fertile group. Supplementing with the mineral improved chances of successful conception by 56 percent. And a second British Journal of Urology study that included 69 infertile men with low levels of the mineral, found selenium supplementation could significantly improve sub-par sperm motility associated with testosterone deficiency. Check out these 7 Testosterone-Boosting Foods!
Size matters, so get slim and stay slim. A trim waistline is one good defense — a man with a 42-inch waist is 50% more likely to have ED than one with a 32-inch waist. Losing weight can help fight erectile dysfunction, so getting to a healthy weight and staying there is another good strategy for avoiding or fixing ED. Obesity raises risks for vascular disease and diabetes, two major causes of ED. And excess fat interferes with several hormones that may be part of the problem as well.
Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic acid) is irreplaceable if you wish to increase life expectancy. Vitamin B5 has a positive impact on the nervous system and intestinal motility. Calcium pantothenate is a form of vitamin B5 that has a powerful anabolic effect, enhances the synthesis of steroid hormones, and takes part in the synthesis of coenzyme A. In addition, calcium pantothenate helps release energy from foods. So, to a large extent, it improves your body’s endurance and stamina, as well as increases human tolerance to different loads.
Testosterone levels generally decrease as an individual ages. This is normal and natural, but it can lead to erectile problems for some people because androgenic hormones such as testosterone play an important part in regulating the function of tissues in the penis and testicles. One study found that supplementing with testosterone gel improved both the libido and erectile function of participants with low testosterone between the ages of 32 and 84.
Much of the evidence shows high rates of vitamin D deficiency in patients with erectile dysfunction. In fact, one study of 3,400 participants found that men with vitamin D deficiency were 32% more likely to have trouble with erections when all other risk factors were controlled for. It’s a little on the nose that you need vitamin D for your “D,” but hey—science can be funny too.
From the overall analysis, the niacin group showed a significant increase in both IIEF-Q3 scores (0.53 ± 1.18, P < 0.001) and IIEF-Q4 scores (0.35 ± 1.17, P = 0.013) compared with baseline values. The placebo group also showed a significant increase in IIEF-Q3 scores (0.30 ± 1.16, P = 0.040) but not IIEF-Q4 scores (0.24 ± 1.13, P = 0.084). However, when patients were stratified according to the baseline severity of ED, the patients with moderate and severe ED who received niacin showed a significant improvement in IIEF-Q3 scores (0.56 ± 0.96 [P = 0.037] and 1.03 ± 1.20 [P < 0.001], respectively) and IIEF-Q4 scores (0.56 ± 1.03 [P = 0.048] and 0.84 ± 1.05 [P < 0.001], respectively] compared with baseline values, but not for the placebo group. The improvement in IIEF-EF domain score for severe and moderate ED patients in the niacin group were 5.28 ± 5.94 (P < 0.001) and 3.31 ± 4.54 (P = 0.014) and in the placebo group were 2.65 ± 5.63 (P < 0.041) and 2.74 ± 5.59 (P = 0.027), respectively. There was no significant improvement in erectile function for patients with mild and mild-to-moderate ED for both groups. For patients not receiving statins treatment, there was a significant improvement in IIEF-Q3 scores (0.47 ± 1.16 [P = 0.004]) for the niacin group, but not for the placebo group.
Response to yohimbine was not dependent on patient age. Patients who showed a positive response had fewer medical risk factors overall, although the small number of patients was not large enough to provide statistical significance. The positive clinical response was verified subjectively both by the formal questionnaire and by the in-office clinical encounter. The positive response was verified objectively by measuring nocturnal penile tumescence and rigidity with the RigiScan™ home monitor. The trend of the baseline penile erectile response was better in the responders, suggesting that use of yohimbine might be more effective in patients who have less severe erectile dysfunction. Some authors have questioned the effect of yohimbine on penile activity, but either inadequate doses of yohimbine were used or only tumescence was measured,21,32 often in an office setting where anxiety and embarrassment might affect results.

Using the protocol of a clinical randomized placebo-controlled parallel-group trial, the study also took place at the University of Hong Kong. One hundred sixty male patients with ED and dyslipidemia were randomized into two groups receiving either up to 1,500 mg of oral niacin daily or placebo for 12 weeks. Using questions from the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF, particularly questions Q3 and Q4), the primary outcome was improvement in erectile function. Q3 ranked “frequency of penetration,” while Q4 ranked “frequency of maintained erections after penetration.” Other outcome measurements included the total IIEF score, IIEF-erectile function domain, and Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM) score.

It’s traditionally used by Pygmies and Bushmen as an aphrodisiac and stimulant. In the 19th century, German missionaries brought this herbal plant to Europe, where it became known as the “love tree.” The extract of this herb is clear and odorless with a bitter taste, and is traditionally prepared and consumed as a tea. Nowadays, medicines and supplements that contain yohimbe bark are available in capsule and tablet form.
Hypovitaminosis may occur due to adherence to a monotonous diet that implies refined grain products’ eating; excessive consumption of carbohydrates and proteins; chronic alcoholism; abuse of beer; sufficient and long-term consumption of raw fish (carp and herring); heavy physical work and nervous tension; exposure to heat or cold; chronic bowel disorders; diabetes; and thyrotoxicosis. The symptoms of vitamin B1 deficiency include decreased appetite, nausea, constipation, headaches, irritability, memory loss, peripheral polyneuritis, tachycardia, labored breathing, precordialgia, and muscle weakness.
Research suggests that drinking alcohol may play a part in erectile problems. One study that considered the prevalence of ED among people diagnosed with alcohol dependence syndrome found that heavy drinkers were more likely to experience sexual dysfunction. Experts also believe that the depressant effect of alcohol can inhibit sexual response and even suppress libido in some people.
Athletes or dieters sometimes use products containing yohimbe to help promote easier weight loss, especially from body fat, and to increase energy expenditure. Some have speculated that it may help increase muscle mass and endurance while cutting fat. But there’s not much evidence from studies that this is necessarily true. Yohimbe does seem to have potential to increase energy expenditure by acting as a stimulant, increasing adrenaline levels in the body and potentially preventing fatigue during or following exercise.
Erectile dysfunction obviously can be frustrating, but it can also be an important warning sign of potential heart disease risk. Once you rule that out, there are natural things you can do to improve it. For more information on how to take control of ED, contact Tack180 for a free consultation. Our experts in nutrition, stress management, behavioral psychology, and fitness go beyond the usual counsel to address your particular vulnerabilities.
But researchers emphasize that immediate-release niacin should remain as a treatment option for high cholesterol. "The point of our study is not that niacin should be avoided, but that the immediate-release preparation is the preferred form, and that medical supervision and evaluation are necessary for people taking this drug," said James McKenney, professor and chairman of the division of clinical pharmacy at the Medical College of Virginia.
DHEA. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is a hormone produced in your body’s adrenal gland that aids in the production of testosterone and other hormones. Since testosterone is critical for healthy male sexuality, supplementing with DHEA may help with issues like sluggish libido and impotence. One double-blind, placebo-controlled study found subjects given 50 milligrams of DHEA every day for six months experienced improvement in symptoms of E.D.
In the present study zinc caused an elevation of T. This showed an increase from 2.39 to 8.21 ng/dl after two weeks of zinc treatment. This elevated T level may have contributed to the increase in number of penile thrusting (from 26.5 to 52.8) observed. Supplementation with 459 μmol/day of zinc for three months, in marginally zinc deficient healthy elderly men, has been shown to increase the levels of serum T from 8.3 to 16 ng/dl.[25] Laboratory experiments indicate that the nitric oxide erectile pathway is T dependent.[26] Many studies using animal models have confirmed that T is important in modulating the central and peripheral regulation of erectile dysfunction. T deprivation has a negative impact on the structure of penile tissues and erectile nerves.[27] Thus, elevated T levels subsequent to zinc supplementation may increase the sexual competence via rigid and sustained erection. This may promote greater tactile stimulation of the penis due to increased contact with vagina.[25]

ED can be caused by a handful of things, but one thing’s for sure: You need a healthy supply of the neurotransmitter nitric oxide (NO) to get and maintain an erection. NO is produced in nerve tissue and helps jolt your Johnson by relaxing the smooth muscle so blood can fill the penis. After the initial release of NO, your body releases a cascade of chemicals—including more of the neurotransmitter—to help keep you hard and happy, according to a study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
But in this case, zinc is much harder to absorb. This explains a decrease in testosterone levels in vegetarians. Slippery jack mushrooms, button mushrooms, beef liver, and fish are also rich in zinc. They are followed by breadstuffs, egg yolk, rabbit, chicken, beans, tea, and cocoa. In addition, zinc is found in onions, garlic, and rice. And a very small amount of zinc is available in fruits, vegetables, and milk.
Move a muscle, but we're not talking about your biceps. A strong pelvic floor enhances rigidity during erections and helps keep blood from leaving the penis by pressing on a key vein. In a British trial, three months of twice-daily sets of Kegel exercises (which strengthen these muscles), combined with biofeedback and advice on lifestyle changes — quitting smoking, losing weight, limiting alcohol — worked far better than just advice on lifestyle changes.

"The good news is, our study also found that a large proportion of men were naturally overcoming erectile dysfunction issues. The remission rate of those with erectile dysfunction was 29%, which is very high. This shows that many of these factors affecting men are modifiable, offering them an opportunity to do something about their condition," Professor Wittert says.
The principal difference between the Hong Kong study. and others that proceeded it, is that the researchers used niacin alone, rather than in combination with PDE5 inhibitors. The results indicate that niacin can improve erectile function in those with moderate to severe ED but not in those with mild and mild-to-moderate ED. Statins also appear to be effective for improving erectile function in those with more severe ED.
Also to be considered, patients were not using PDE5 inhibitors during the study period. Therefore it wasn’t determined whether the combined use with niacin can enhance the response of PDE5 inhibitors. Another limitation on the study results was the exclusion of the partner’s assessments. This would help to provide a more comprehensive assessment of the efficacy of niacin.
Between 2001–2006, one-third of the US population had insufficient amounts of vitamin D, according to the Institute of Medicine. Risk factors for vitamin D deficiency include obesity and high BMI, not enough sun exposure or outdoor activity, having darker skin and suffering from certain from inflammatory conditions like Crohn’s disease. You can get a blood test to find out if you’re vitamin D deficient.
×