Erne P,  Schoenenberger AW,  Zuber M,  Burckhardt D,  Kiowski W,  Dubach P,  Resink T,  Pfisterer M. Effects of anti-ischaemic drug therapy in silent myocardial ischaemia type I: the Swiss Interventional Study on Silent Ischaemia type I (SWISSI I): a randomized, controlled pilot study, Eur Heart J , 2007, vol. 28 (pg. 2110-2117)https://doi.org/10.1093/eurheartj/ehm273

Crossref | PubMed | Google ScholarSee all References Risk factors for cardiovascular disease include diabetes mellitus, obesity, physical inactivity, hyperlipidemia, tobacco use, and hypertension. Often, the relative risk of each of these factors in the development of ED is difficult to assess because many patients with ED and cardiovascular disease have more than 1 risk factor. Another important consideration is the effect of cardiac disease itself on erectile function. A history of a prior myocardial infarction was not found to be a significant independent risk factor for ED in a study comparing sexual function in 50 patients who had a prior myocardial infarction with a control group of 50 patients.14x14Dhabuwala, CB, Kumar, A, and Pierce, JM. Myocardial infarction and its influence on male sexual function. Arch Sex Behav. 1986; 15: 499–504
Men with diabetes tend to develop erectile dysfunction 10 to 15 years earlier than men without diabetes. As men with diabetes age, erectile dysfunction becomes even more common. Above the age of 50, the likelihood of having difficulty with an erection occurs in approximately 50% to 60% of men with diabetes. Above age 70, there is about a 95% likelihood of having some difficulty with erectile dysfunction.
×