Abstract | Full Text | Full Text PDF | PubMed | Scopus (25) | Google ScholarSee all References The Framingham Heart Study found a baseline risk of myocardial infarction in a healthy 50-year-old nonsmoking man to be approximately 1% per year, or 1 chance per million per hour.87x87Anderson, KM, Odell, PM, Wilson, PW, and Kannel, WB. Cardiovascular disease risk profiles. Am Heart J. 1991; 121: 293–298
The research is based on a Swedish national database of health records that includes all hospitals in Sweden. Researchers analyzed the records of men age 80 years or younger who were hospitalized for a first heart attack between 2007 and 2013. Tracking the men for an average of 3.3 years following this first heart attack, they compared outcomes among those who subsequently filled a prescription for a PDE5 inhibitor or alprostadil to those who did not. Overall just over 7 percent of men were prescribed an erectile dysfunction drug, 92 percent of whom were prescribed a PDE5 inhibitor and 8 percent of whom were prescribed alprostadil.
Abstract | Full Text PDF | PubMed | Scopus (29) | Google ScholarSee all References After controlling for diabetes mellitus, tobacco use, and hyperlipidemia, hypertension was not found to be an independent predictor of vasculogenic ED in 440 impotent men as measured by the PBI.7x7Virag, R, Bouilly, P, and Frydman, D. Is impotence an arterial disorder? a study of arterial risk factors in 440 impotent men. Lancet. 1985; 1: 181–184
Medicines known as PDE5 inhibitors can help two-thirds of men with ED. These include Viagra (sildenafil), Cialis (tadalafil) and Levitra (vardenafil). You may need to take several doses over time before they work properly, and you may need to adjust the dose. National guidelines say you can be prescribed these drugs from six months after a heart attack, providing your condition is stable.
The pathophysiological basis for the predictive ability of ED has been discussed above. It should be emphasized, however, that ED should not only be viewed as a manifestation of obstructive CAD that could be identified by ischaemia revealing tests. Owing to the inflammatory and pro-thrombotic activation of the disease,13 it should also be regarded as an early warning sign of an imminent acute event (mainly acute myocardial infarction)22 due to the rupture of a subclinical plaque, and thus identification of the risk should ideally include plaque vulnerability tests. Finally, an issue that has important clinical implications is by how long the clinical manifestation of ED precedes the clinical manifestation of CAD. According to studies, men with ED and no cardiac symptoms have an increased incidence of experiencing a cardiac event, both acute and chronic, in the ensuing 2–5 years, thus providing a ‘window of opportunity’ for risk reduction management in these patients.2
The physical exam should focus on femoral and peripheral pulses, femoral bruits (vascular abnormalities), visual field defects (prolactinoma or pituitary mass), breast exam (hyperprolactinemia), penile strictures (Peyronie’s disease), testicle atrophy (testosterone deficiency), and asymmetry or masses (hypogonadism). A rectal exam allows for assessment of both the prostate and sphincter tone, abnormalities that are associated with autonomic dysfunction. Sacral and perineal neurological exam will help in assessing autonomic function.

Abstract | Full Text | Full Text PDF | PubMed | Scopus (46) | Google ScholarSee all References Sedentary patients with a history of cardiac disease and patients with unstable angina or advanced congestive heart failure should undergo a full medical evaluation before resuming sexual activity.80x80Muller, JE. Triggering of cardiac events by sexual activity: findings from a case-crossover analysis. Am J Cardiol. 2000; 86: 14F–18F
Not surprisingly, they found that diabetic patients rated kidney disease and blindness as the two most important complications of their condition. Diabetic men with ED ranked ED as the third most important complication of diabetes, followed on average in order by foot ulcers, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, migraine headaches, sleeping disorders, and mild indigestion. Diabetic men without ED found ED slightly less important, ranking it behind foot ulcers and high blood pressure, although all three were grouped fairly close together (mean ranks were 4.59, 4.23, and 4.52, respectively). Interestingly, in men both with and without ED, subjects were willing to pay more per month to avoid ED than all other conditions except blindness and kidney disease (mean values for diabetic patients with ED were £50.5, £88.0, and £66.1, respectively). In summary, erectile function is important to diabetic men, and when ED is present, it has a significant negative effect on quality of life.

The research is based on a Swedish national database of health records that includes all hospitals in Sweden. Researchers analyzed the records of men age 80 years or younger who were hospitalized for a first heart attack between 2007 and 2013. Tracking the men for an average of 3.3 years following this first heart attack, they compared outcomes among those who subsequently filled a prescription for a PDE5 inhibitor or alprostadil to those who did not. Overall just over 7 percent of men were prescribed an erectile dysfunction drug, 92 percent of whom were prescribed a PDE5 inhibitor and 8 percent of whom were prescribed alprostadil.

Like the case of untreated hypertensive patients, evaluation of sexual dysfunction in hypertensive patients under antihypertensive regime, should primarily exclude other concomitant diseases and pharmaceutical agents. Consecutively, a competent physician with advanced communicational skills should try to “discover” medically induced erectile dysfunction since a vast majority of patients being under complex antihypertensive regimes usually attribute the undesirable effect to normal aging thus not relating it to their current medication. Moreover, even physicians seldom report the cases of sexual dysfunction associated with certain medications. When medically induced sexual dysfunction is finally disclosed and a shift in medication is deemed necessary, b-blockers along with diuretics should generally be the first categories to be changed, unless they are deemed absolutely indicated for the individual patient. Ideally, an ARB could constitute the mainstay of therapy in these cases. If sexual dysfunction still persists, then more effective remedies should be elected paving the way for the introduction of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors (PDE-5).
Following the breakthrough in ED treatment using PDE5-inhibitors, Western medicine has now moved on to a new frontier of regenerative medicine, with stem cell and gene therapy leading the way (25). There is a practical need for novel therapy as a significant portion of diabetic or post-prostatectomy ED patients do not respond to oral pharmacotherapy. To date, stem cells derived from different sites including adipose tissue-derived stem cells, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and muscle-derived stem cells have been investigated using animal models for ED, to study their effects on neural, vascular, endothelial or smooth muscle regeneration (25,26).
Since 1998, when sildenafil (brand name Viagra) first came on the market, oral therapy has been successfully used to treat erectile dysfunction in many men with diabetes. (Sildenafil was followed in 2003 by the drugs tadalafil [Cialis], vardenafil [Levitra] and avanafil [Stendra], which work in much the same way.) Some 50% of men with Type 1 diabetes who try the drugs report improved erections, and some 60% men with Type 2 diabetes do, too. However, that leaves a large percentage of men with diabetes and erectile dysfunction who do not respond to therapy with one of these pills. This article takes a look at what can be done to treat those men who do not respond to oral therapy.
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