The common associations between cardiovascular disease and ED have led some researchers to explore whether onset of ED can be an effective predictor of the presence of cardiovascular disease. A study of 40 patients with cardiac disease found an association between sexual dysfunction and the presence of cardiovascular disease, as well as a correlation between the severity of ED and the number of coronary arteries with extensive atherosclerosis.16x16Greenstein, A, Chen, J, Miller, H, Matzkin, H, Villa, Y, and Braf, Z. Does severity of ischemic coronary disease correlate with erectile function?. Int J Impot Res. 1997; 9: 123–126

Table 1 offers elements for distinction between organic and psychogenic disease.7 Of note is that in cases of organic origin, a psychogenic component may co-exist. The most common organic aetiology of ED is vasculogenic (see below ‘ED and CAD: common pathophysiology’).2,3 Co-existence of vascular disease, advancing age, and the presence of CVD risk factors and metabolic disorders increase the likelihood that ED is of vasculogenic aetiology.
Abstract | PubMed | Scopus (136) | Google ScholarSee all References Another study evaluated 32 hypertensive men with ED and 78 normotensive men with ED with regard to age, body mass index, hormonal profile, penile arterial flow, risk factors for arterial disease, psychiatric disease, and neurologic disease measured by pudendal nerve conduction studies.30x30Jaffe, A, Chen, Y, Kisch, ES, Fischel, B, Alon, M, and Stern, N. Erectile dysfunction in hypertensive subjects: assessment of potential determinants. Hypertension. 1996; 28: 859–862
After the initiation of TTh patients should be evaluated at 3 and 6 months, and annually thereafter to assess response to treatment and monitor adverse effects. Assessment should include physical examination with particular attention to the prostate. At these intervals testosterone levels should also be monitored, as well as PSA, haematocrit, and HDL.45
Since 1998, when sildenafil (brand name Viagra) first came on the market, oral therapy has been successfully used to treat erectile dysfunction in many men with diabetes. (Sildenafil was followed in 2003 by the drugs tadalafil [Cialis], vardenafil [Levitra] and avanafil [Stendra], which work in much the same way.) Some 50% of men with Type 1 diabetes who try the drugs report improved erections, and some 60% men with Type 2 diabetes do, too. However, that leaves a large percentage of men with diabetes and erectile dysfunction who do not respond to therapy with one of these pills. This article takes a look at what can be done to treat those men who do not respond to oral therapy.
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