Shindel, A. W., Xin, Z.-C., Lin, G., Fandel, T. M., Huang, Y.-C., Banie, L., … Lue, T. F. (2010, February 5). Erectogenic and neurotrophic effects of icariin, a purified extract of horny goat weed (Epimedium spp.) in vitro and in vivo. The Journal of Sexual Medicine, 7(4), 1518-1528. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1743-6109.2009.01699.x/full
There are many different body parts that play an important role for a man to get and maintain an erection during sexual intercourse. Beyond the physical causes that can lead to ED, it has been reported that 20% of ED is related to psychological causes.2 With so many possibilities leading to erectile dysfunction, it becomes particularly important to find a specialist who can correctly diagnosis the direct cause of your ED and find a treatment option that is right for you.
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Consider this:  penicillin, the first successful antibiotic, was derived from molds that inhibit bacterial growth.  Scientists had to figure out why the molds slowed bacteria, and refine the active ingredients.  Using herbal supplements is somewhat like putting mold on a wound.  It might help, a little, but it’s certainly not going to help as much as using penicillin.
Diseases like diabetes, cardiovascular disease, atherosclerosis, kidney disease, obesity, multiple sclerosis, and depression, and activities like bicycling, smoking, alcohol or drug abuse can impair blood flow or nerve impulses throughout the body. Surgery, as well as certain medications, can also result in ED. However, this may be a temporary problem.4
Despite the name, horny goat weed actually helps improve your erection, not libido.  Botanically known as epimedium, this herb has been used by the Chinese for centuries to treat, among other things, low libido and erectile dysfunction. “A growing body of research shows that isolated icariin—the extract of epimedium—inhibits the enzyme phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE-5) and significantly increases nitric oxide synthase, helping to improve erectile function,” says Fisch. In fact, this is the same mechanism that Viagra works through (but the herb comes with a way better name).
She is ‘a pile of mashed potatoes’, her breasts are a ‘tragedy’, she looks terrible in clothes but even worse when nude, wanted surgery for ‘a quick fix’ because she is too lazy to exercise, she has never looked worse, etc … and you are faking erectile dysfunction because you do not want to talk about the fact that you are still crying over a breast reduction that you didn’t want her to get.
The penile roots are enveloped by two pelvic floor muscles, the bulbocavernosus (BC) and the ischiocavernosus (IC). The IC muscle is the “erector muscle” and the BC muscle the “ejaculator muscle.” The BC and IC muscles are responsible for the ability to lift one’s erect penis up and down (wag the penis) as they are contracted and relaxed. Although not muscles of glamour, they are certainly muscles of “amour.” Although unseen and behind-the-scenes, hidden from view, these often unrecognized and misunderstood muscles have vital functions in addition to erection and ejaculation. When the pelvic floor muscles are not functioning optimally, one loses the potential for full erectile rigidity. Like other skeletal muscles, they can undergo “disuse atrophy,” becoming thinner, flabbier and less functional with aging, weight gain, sedentary lifestyles, poor posture, chronic straining and other forms of trauma, including pelvic surgery (e.g., prostatectomy). Exercising them can enhance sexual health; maintain sexual health; help prevent the occurrence of ED in the future; and help manage ED. Specifically, pelvic floor exercises can be beneficial with respect to the following spectrum of issues: ED; ejaculation issues including premature ejaculation; urinary incontinence; overactive bladder; post-void dribbling; and bowel urgency and incontinence. One of the challenges of pelvic floor training is that most men do not know where their pelvic muscles are located, what they do, how to exercise them, and what benefits exercising them may confer. In fact, many men don’t even know that they have pelvic floor muscles. Because they are out of sight, they are often out of mind and not considered when it comes to exercise and fitness. However, although concealed from view, they deserve serious respect as they are responsible for vital functions that can be enhanced when intensified by training. Pelvic floor muscle training before and after prostate cancer surgery can facilitate the resumption of urinary control and sexual function after surgery. Pelvic floor training is also useful for men who suffer with stress urinary incontinence following prostatectomy. This is a spurt-like urinary leakage that occurs at times of increased abdominal pressure, such as with sports and other high impact activities. Pelvic floor contractions on demand are a technique in which the pelvic muscles are braced and briskly engaged at the time or just before any activity that triggers the stress incontinence. When practiced diligently, this can ultimately become an automatic behavior and the incontinence improved, if not resolved.
So, how to increase the sexual potency? Firstly, get rid of bad food habits and revise your diet consuming more foods rich in zinc, protein, vitamins, and essential fatty acids. Often, the opponents of vegetarian diet and raw food diet argue that vegetarianism/veganism and sex are incompatible. Moreover, they assert that abstinence from meat leads to a substantial decrease in male potency. Allegedly, to make a sex life active, the male diet must necessarily include meat. And more is better. In fact, this is not true. The main thing is to ensure that you get all essential nutrients from food. And the foods of plant origin are a great source of these nutrients. Let’s consider the issue in more detail.

While carrots have always been touted for their benefits for the eyes, studies reveal that carotenoids, vitamins, and minerals present in carrots act as antioxidants, anticarcinogens, and immune enhancers. Carrots also boast of antihypertensive, hepatoprotective, renoprotective, and wound healing benefits as well as cardio- and hepatoprotective, antibacterial, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic effects. Studies on male rats have shown that carrots can exert an effect on fertility by elevating testosterone levels in them.10


While generally thought of as a problem affecting only older men, a study published in 2013 found that one in four men with newly diagnosed ED at a clinic in Italy were younger than 40 years old. With other research suggesting over half of all men between the ages of 40 and 70 now suffer from some degree of ED, and estimates showing the total cost of orthodox treatment in the United States could reach $15 billion if all men affected sought treatment, solutions that address the condition’s primary cause are urgently needed.

Ginkgo biloba. Ginkgo is an herb that is used in Chinese medicine that’s thought to improve blood flow. "Any ED treatment that improves blood flow may help," explains Dr. Harris. "An erection is just blood in and blood out." However, the evidence that ginkgo can improve blood flow in ED is limited, and most experts say the jury is still out. In addition, ginkgo can increase the risk for bleeding problems if combined with certain medications, such as warfarin (Coumadin).


Eastern medicine should be fully exploited, and integrated with modern medicine to combine the advantages of both TCM and Western medicine. More research should be conducted into the efficacy and safety of TCM, and integration of TCM and Western medicine may provide promising breakthroughs in future clinical treatment. This strategy may allow for the development of new therapeutic strategies based on concepts of TCM and integrated medicine. There is a need for multimodal therapy and holistic approach to treat men (and their partners) with ED through complementary use of herbal supplements and modern drug to optimize underlying medical comorbidities; acupuncture, exercise or massage to reduce stress and strengthen the body; introduction and escalation of various medical therapy with use of mechanical therapy to further enhance penile erection; and lastly surgical intervention in suboptimal or refractory ED cases.

While carrots have always been touted for their benefits for the eyes, studies reveal that carotenoids, vitamins, and minerals present in carrots act as antioxidants, anticarcinogens, and immune enhancers. Carrots also boast of antihypertensive, hepatoprotective, renoprotective, and wound healing benefits as well as cardio- and hepatoprotective, antibacterial, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic effects. Studies on male rats have shown that carrots can exert an effect on fertility by elevating testosterone levels in them.10
Most importantly, herbal supplements are not well regulated in the United States.  Studies have shown that 40-50% of herbal supplements do not even contain the supposed main ingredient, and many contain substances that are not listed which may have dangerous side effects2.  Another study found that over two thirds of the products tested had substituted other plant species for the plants listed on the label, and a third of products also contained other fillers or contaminants3.  A study by the New York State Attorney General of herbal products sold at GNC, Target, Walgreens, and Walmart found that four out of every five products didn’t contain the ingredient they claimed!  Fourteen US states and territories have petitioned Congress to regulate the herbal supplements industry.

Safety Warning Do not use this product if you take any other medications or have any medical condition such as heart disease, high blood pressure, seizures, stroke, cancer, liver failure, severe headaches, allergies or any other condition. Consult a physician if you have heart problems before taking this pill. Do not exceed recommended daily intake. Consult your doctor before taking this pill. Stop using immediately if undesirable effects develop. Keep out of the reach of children. DO NOT take if you are pregnant, have high blood pressure, diabetic, or have any heart disease/problem. Store this product in a cool and dry place. Do not take this pill with anything that may have nitrate in it. If you are currently under treatment for ANY medical conditions, please consult your physician before taking this pill. — Before taking this or any other supplement, always consult with a medical professional to ensure there will be no adverse interactions with existing medications. Please use caution if you have sensitivity to any of the listed ingredients. Because of the purity of this product, in rare circumstances, individuals consuming this product may experience allergic reactions, digestive distress, upset stomach, diarrhea, constipation, heartburn, gas, headaches, dizziness, jitters, stomach pain, sickness, nausea, fatigue, changes in blood pressure, bloating, irritation, sleeplessness, pain or discomfort. Because of the potency and purity of this Ginseng extract, the capsules are not meant to be opened, as they will have a bitter and seemingly "salty" taste and smell. If any of these symptoms persist, discontinue use immediately and contact a licensed medical doctor or professional. Please contact us for a complete refund if any of the effects of this product are too strong to tolerate. Do not use if seal around cap is broken or missing. Do not exceed recommended dose. Pregnant or nursing mothers, children under the age of 18, and individuals with known medical condition should consult a physician before using this or any dietary supplement. Please use caution if you have sensitivity to any of the listed ingredients. Consumption of herbal ingredients may cause allergies to certain individuals, please check with your physician before taking any herbal supplements. If you have a history of allergies to herbal ingredients, do not consume this product. Possible side effects include dizziness, headache, nausea, vomiting, constipation, and diarrhea.
Handful of things can cause erectile dysfunction, but healthy vitamins supply for erection will make your sex life very soothing and romantic. Healthy blood vessels are necessary for good circulation, as blood is pumped around the body to carry nutrients to the cells. Vitamins can help the blood vessels to dilate or open so blood can fill the manhood. 
Yohimbine. This chemical is found in the bark of an African tree called yohimbe. It has been used as a male aphrodisiac in Africa, and under medical supervision it has been used as a prescription drug to treat ED. Supplements made from yohimbe bark are also available without a prescription, but they can be life-threatening if used at high doses, according to the Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database. The supplement can interact in a harmful way with certain drugs, such as blood pressure medications, and should be avoided by anyone with liver, kidney, heart, or diabetes problems or problems with anxiety or depression. Like DHEA, yohimbine should not be taken without a doctor's supervision.
This tasty green nut may be more than a great snack. A study published in the International Journal of Impotence Research examined how eating pistachios affected ED. Measurements were taken before men were put on a nut-heavy diet and after. Consuming pistachios for several weeks showed improvement in several parameters of ED, including improved International Index of Erectile Function scores for study participants.
A study in the Journal of Sexual Medicine found that a large percentage of men with ED also have low levels of vitamin D. If you’re experiencing ED, you may want to have your level of vitamin D checked. Other symptoms of a low vitamin D level may be too subtle to notice. However, if you have serious vitamin D deficiency, you may have bone pain or muscle weakness. Vitamin D levels can be checked with a simple blood test and for most people corrected with a supplement.

Other factors that “stress” the body can also increase your risk for ED. These include: substance abuse, using marijuana, smoking cigarettes, depression, anxiety and low self esteem. Cigarette smoking — or using nicotine — leads to constricted blood vessels, which has negative effects for sexual health. Other mental/emotional obstacles can cause less desire for sex and decrease testosterone. Several ways to help manage stress include:

While Western medicine emphases the link between cardiovascular function and ED, TCM places importance on liver and kidney ailments as causative factor for development of ED. Western medicine involves a step-wise approach by targeting the relevant organ systems to treat various clinical symptoms; but TCM focuses on restoring the balance between various organs to achieve harmony and holistic approach to inner sense (4). The following article reviews our current understanding regarding the philosophical approach, and evaluates the evidence surrounding various ED therapies between mainstream Western medicine and TCM (see Table 1).
In total, 24 RCTs, including 2080 patients with ED, were identified. Among these, 12 evaluated monopreparations (five ginseng [n = 399], three saffron [n = 397], two Tribulus terrestris [n = 202], and one each Pinus pinaster [n = 21] and Lepidium meyenii [n = 50]), seven evaluated formulations (n = 544), and five investigated dietary supplements in combination with pure compounds (n = 410). Ginseng significantly improved erectile function (International Index of Erectile Function [IIEF]-5 score: 140 ginseng, 96 placebo; standardized mean difference [SMD] 0.43; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.15-0.70; P < 0.01; I2 = 0), P. pinaster and L. meyenii showed very preliminary positive results, and saffron and T. terrestris treatment produced mixed results. Several herbal formulations were associated with a decrease of IIEF-5 or IIEF-15, although the results were preliminary. The quality of the included studies varied, with only seven having a prevalent low risk of bias. The median methodological quality Jadad score was three out of a maximum of five. Adverse events were recorded in 19 of 24 trials, with no significant differences between placebo and verum in placebo-controlled studies.
Research indicates that some specific nutrients—from common vitamins to lesser-known plant extracts—have demonstrated positive effects on very specific aspects of penile performance. Eat This Not That! has rounded up the best examples of these superfoods. And make your little guy look bigger by flattening your belly! After reading this, don’t miss these best foods for sexual stamina!
Arginine. The amino acid L-arginine, which occurs naturally in food, boosts the body's production of nitric oxide, a compound that facilitates erections by dilating blood vessels in the penis. Studies examining L-arginine's effectiveness against impotence have yielded mixed results. A 1999 trial published in the online journal BJU International found that high doses of L-arginine can help improve sexual function, but only in men with abnormal nitric oxide metabolism, such as that associated with cardiovascular disease. In another study, published in 2003 in the Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy, Bulgarian scientists reported that ED sufferers who took L-arginine along with the pine extract pycnogenol saw major improvements in sexual function with no side effects. Arginine can be helpful, says Geo Espinosa, ND, director of the Integrative Urological Center at NYU Langone Medical Center. Espinosa says that men with known cardiovascular problems should take it only with a doctor's supervision; L-arginine can interact with some medications.
If you’ve been to the health food store lately, you’ve seen shelves lined with vitamins and “organic” supplements, each claiming to boost immunity, revitalize organ function, or “promote health.” And it’s working. Supplements are currently a $30 billion industry in the US, with more than 90,000 products on the market, and vitamin use is on the rise. In fact, a recent survey in Journal of American Medicine Association showed that “52% of US adults reported use of at least 1 supplement product.”
If you can't take one of these oral medications, your physician may have you try Caverject (alprostadil for injection), a hormone that you inject into your penis using a fine needle, or Muse (alprostadil urogenital), a tiny suppository that you insert into the tip of the penis. Both of these will bring on an erection within five to 15 minutes without sexual stimulation.
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