These medications don’t work for everyone but they are easy to use and work for around 60% of people who try them. They work by making it easier to get an erection by reducing the effect of (inhibiting) the chemical PDE-5. This chemical is used in the body to make sure there isn’t too much blood in the penis during an erection, but if you have erectile dysfunction then this chemical ends up over-compensating.
Safety Warning Do not use this product if you take any other medications or have any medical condition such as heart disease, high blood pressure, seizures, stroke, cancer, liver failure, severe headaches, allergies or any other condition. Consult a physician if you have heart problems before taking this pill. Do not exceed recommended daily intake. Consult your doctor before taking this pill. Stop using immediately if undesirable effects develop. Keep out of the reach of children. DO NOT take if you are pregnant, have high blood pressure, diabetic, or have any heart disease/problem. Store this product in a cool and dry place. Do not take this pill with anything that may have nitrate in it. If you are currently under treatment for ANY medical conditions, please consult your physician before taking this pill. — Before taking this or any other supplement, always consult with a medical professional to ensure there will be no adverse interactions with existing medications. Please use caution if you have sensitivity to any of the listed ingredients. Because of the purity of this product, in rare circumstances, individuals consuming this product may experience allergic reactions, digestive distress, upset stomach, diarrhea, constipation, heartburn, gas, headaches, dizziness, jitters, stomach pain, sickness, nausea, fatigue, changes in blood pressure, bloating, irritation, sleeplessness, pain or discomfort. Because of the potency and purity of this Ginseng extract, the capsules are not meant to be opened, as they will have a bitter and seemingly "salty" taste and smell. If any of these symptoms persist, discontinue use immediately and contact a licensed medical doctor or professional. Please contact us for a complete refund if any of the effects of this product are too strong to tolerate. Do not use if seal around cap is broken or missing. Do not exceed recommended dose. Pregnant or nursing mothers, children under the age of 18, and individuals with known medical condition should consult a physician before using this or any dietary supplement. Please use caution if you have sensitivity to any of the listed ingredients. Consumption of herbal ingredients may cause allergies to certain individuals, please check with your physician before taking any herbal supplements. If you have a history of allergies to herbal ingredients, do not consume this product. Possible side effects include dizziness, headache, nausea, vomiting, constipation, and diarrhea.
By far the most common cause of ED is vascular dysfunction. When the arteries that supply the penis with blood to achieve and maintain an erection are blocked or hardened, or the lining of these arteries are damaged, blood flow is reduced. Vascular dysfunction not only affects the small arteries of the penis, but the larger coronary arteries of the heart too. Astute doctors now recognize that ED may actually be an early warning sign of impending cardiovascular disease, showing up several years before a cardiovascular event like a heart attack or stroke.2 To maintain healthy vascular function, and in turn, normal erectile function, consider these supplements:
A combination of yohimbine and L-arginine is shown to significantly improve erectile function in people with ED. L-arginine is an amino acid that helps expand blood vessels. It’s regarded as safe and effective for ED but can cause side effects like nausea, diarrhea, and stomach cramps. Avoid taking L-arginine with Viagra, nitrates, or any high blood pressure medications.
A recent study in the journal Circulation found that flavonoids in dark chocolate improve circulation. That could be good for erection problems that are due to poor circulation. Flavonoids are naturally-occurring antioxidants that protect plants from toxins and help repair cell damage. Studies show that flavonoids and other antioxidants have similar effects on people. They may help lower blood pressure and decrease cholesterol, both of which are factors that contribute to erectile dysfunction.
A study published in the journal Fertility and Sterility that analyzed the effect of various fruit and vegetables on sperm quality discovered carrots had the best all-round results on sperm count and motility — a term used to describe the ability of sperm to swim towards an egg. Men who ate the most carrots saw improved sperm performance by 6.5 to 8 percent. The Harvard researchers attribute the boost to carotenoids, powerful antioxidative compounds in carrots that help the body make vitamin A.
Yohimbine. This chemical is found in the bark of an African tree called yohimbe. It has been used as a male aphrodisiac in Africa, and under medical supervision it has been used as a prescription drug to treat ED. Supplements made from yohimbe bark are also available without a prescription, but they can be life-threatening if used at high doses, according to the Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database. The supplement can interact in a harmful way with certain drugs, such as blood pressure medications, and should be avoided by anyone with liver, kidney, heart, or diabetes problems or problems with anxiety or depression. Like DHEA, yohimbine should not be taken without a doctor's supervision.
Disclaimer: While we work to ensure that product information is correct, on occasion manufacturers may alter their ingredient lists. Actual product packaging and materials may contain more and/or different information than that shown on our Web site. We recommend that you do not solely rely on the information presented and that you always read labels, warnings, and directions before using or consuming a product. For additional information about a product, please contact the manufacturer. Content on this site is for reference purposes and is not intended to substitute for advice given by a physician, pharmacist, or other licensed health-care professional. You should not use this information as self-diagnosis or for treating a health problem or disease. Contact your health-care provider immediately if you suspect that you have a medical problem. Information and statements regarding dietary supplements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease or health condition. Amazon.com assumes no liability for inaccuracies or misstatements about products.
Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.
THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common condition characterized by difficulty in getting or maintaining an erection. While the likelihood that a man will experience this problem increases with age, it often occurs alongside and as a result of other conditions such as heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, or prostate disease. As with other health problems, however, the pharmaceutical drugs prescribed by conventional medicine to treat ED can cause serious side effects. Fortunately, therefore, use of the Cellular Medicine approach can help resolve ED safely and naturally.  
Wu, Guoyao; Collins, Julie K; Perkins-Veazie, Penelope; Siddiq, Muhammad; Dolan, Kirk D; Kelly, Katherine A; Heaps, Cristine L; Meininger, Cynthia J. “Dietary Supplementation with Watermelon Pomace Juice Enhances Arginine Availability and Ameliorates the Metabolic Syndrome in Zucker Diabetic Fatty Rats.” The Journal of Nutrition. Dec 2007. Volume 137, Issue 12, Pages 2680–2685.
Although you should steer clear of supplements advertised online, research shows certain vitamins and herbs can help ED. They may help improve the health of your blood vessels, increase blood flow to the penis, and boost erectile function. If other treatments have failed, you’re not a candidate for ED medications, or you’re looking for a more natural approach, ask your doctor whether these supplements could be right for you. Here are three to discuss with your doctor:
DHEA. Testosterone is essential for a healthy libido and normal sexual function, and erectile dysfunction sufferers known to have low testosterone improve when placed on prescription testosterone replacement therapy. Similarly, studies have shown that taking over-the-counter supplements containing DHEA, a hormone that the body converts to testosterone and estrogen, can help alleviate some cases of ED. But DHEA can cause problems, including suppression of pituitary function, acne, hair loss and its long-term safety is unknown, says McCullough. For this reason, many experts discourage use of the supplements.
B-vitamin complex helps to support normal energy production and is also essential for supporting the normal functioning of the body during times of stress. Stress quickly depletes the body’s reserves of the B vitamins. Look for a B-complex containing 20-50 mg of vitamins B1, B2, and B3. The other B vitamins should be included in their relative proportions.
Move a muscle, but we're not talking about your biceps. A strong pelvic floor enhances rigidity during erections and helps keep blood from leaving the penis by pressing on a key vein. In a British trial, three months of twice-daily sets of Kegel exercises (which strengthen these muscles), combined with biofeedback and advice on lifestyle changes — quitting smoking, losing weight, limiting alcohol — worked far better than just advice on lifestyle changes.
Honey, unlike table sugar, is packed with beneficial compounds like quercetin, which has been shown to aid athletic endurance and ward off depression.. Honey also has a less dramatic impact on your blood-sugar levels than regular sugar, so it won’t send your body into fat-storage mode the way the white stuff can. Try adding some honey to your afternoon tea or morning bowl of oatmeal, but don’t go overboard; the sweet nectar has 17 g of sugar and 64 calories per tablespoon, so too much honey can make you heavy, rather than horny.
A recent study in the journal Circulation found that flavonoids in dark chocolate improve circulation. That could be good for erection problems that are due to poor circulation. Flavonoids are naturally-occurring antioxidants that protect plants from toxins and help repair cell damage. Studies show that flavonoids and other antioxidants have similar effects on people. They may help lower blood pressure and decrease cholesterol, both of which are factors that contribute to erectile dysfunction.

A guy has a heart attack at 45 because he took treatment. doesn't mean the treatment caused it. could have been his genetics and a million gut bombs..or that he was a prison subject, still it will go down in the list of possible side effevts. there's no way to prove a drug causes evert reaction. Not when they are only around for a few years anyway.Part of the bad rap for GH comes from all the misuse, athletic and hollywood, but docs won't prescribe megadoses for people to become the hulk.

Reiter, W. J., Pycha, A., Schatzl, G., Pokorny, A., Gruber, D. M., Huber, J. C., & Marberger, M. (1999, March). Dehydroepiandrostone in the treatment of erectile dysfunction: A prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study [Abstract]. Urology, 53(3), 590-594. Retrieved from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0090429598005718
×