How common is impotence? According to findings from several studies, including “The Massachusetts Male Aging Study,” overall prevalence for men between 40–70 years old is around 52 percent (or around 30 percent of all men between 18–60 years old). That’s right — nearly half of all men over 40 experience erectile dysfunction symptoms at some point. Not surprisingly, research demonstrates that impotence is increasingly prevalent with age. Around 40 percent of men in their 40s experience sexual dysfunction. Up to 70 percent of men in their 70s experience ED. (1) Every year more than 617,000 new cases of impotence occur in the United States alone.

It can’t be stressed enough — a healthy diet and lifestyle has numerous benefits, including in the bedroom. ED is linked to cardiovascular disease and diabetes, so eating a Mediterranean-style diet rich in fresh fruits and vegetables, healthy fats, and whole grains can reduce your chance of developing heart problems and, in turn, can alleviate your ED.
Mirroring the micronutrient synergy approach that has been pioneered by scientists at the Dr. Rath Research Institute, research has shown that the combination of arginine and pycnogenol, an extract from French maritime pine bark, can correct ED in 80 percent of patients after just two months. After a period of three months, the researchers found that an impressive 92.5 percent of patients were experiencing normal erectile function without any side effects.
The most common adverse events associated with all of the PDE-5 inhibitors10 are headaches in 16% of men; flushing in 10% of men; dyspepsia (7%); nasal congestion (4%), and visual disturbances/color sensitivity in about 3%. Tadalafil distinguishes itself from vardenafil and sildenafil by the relative lack of visual side effects. It does, however, have an additional possible adverse effect, which is back pain and/or myalgia.11
There have been some studies to suggest that a placebo effect that improves ED may work for some men. One study found that men taking an oral placebo pill showed as much improvement in ED symptoms as men who took actual medication to improve ED. Conversely, men who were given therapeutic suggestions to improve ED did not see signs of symptom improvement.

B-vitamin complex helps to support normal energy production and is also essential for supporting the normal functioning of the body during times of stress. Stress quickly depletes the body’s reserves of the B vitamins. Look for a B-complex containing 20-50 mg of vitamins B1, B2, and B3. The other B vitamins should be included in their relative proportions.

Turns out that good ol’ P.B. is an aphrodisiac in disguise. It’s rich in two nutrients that are key to good bedroom performance: Niacin (with a quarter of your recommended daily value in two tablespoons) and vitamin E (75% of your DV in that same serving). In a study printed in the Journal of Sexual Health, men suffering from impotence who took a niacin supplement reported a significant improvement in their bedroom prowess compared to men who took a placebo. Peanut butter is also a good source of folate, which improves sperm quality. Click here to see our top 16 Nut Butters for Muscle Building and Weight Loss!
Eating more fruit, vegetables, fish, and less red meat and refined grains can decrease the risk of ED. Maintaining a healthy weight is also important, since men who have a waist that is 42-inches or more are 50 percent more likely to get erectile dysfunction. Obesity increases the risk of vascular disease and diabetes, which are known to contribute to ED.
If you have symptoms of ED, it’s important to check with your doctor before trying any treatments on your own. This is because ED can be a sign of other health problems. For instance, heart disease or high cholesterol could cause ED symptoms. With a diagnosis, your doctor could recommend a number of steps that would likely improve both your heart health and your ED. These steps include lowering your cholesterol, reducing your weight, or taking medications to unclog your blood vessels.
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