Processed Foods tend to have fat, salt, and sugar added to them, as well as preservatives and other chemical additives that can be harmful to your health. Processed foods include frozen foods, canned foods, processed meats, and many snack foods. Some research links eating processed foods to depression, which is something that can cause erectile dysfunction.

Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

Antioxidants  boost nitric oxide production and prevent NO breakdown. Ascorbic acid has direct effects on the bioactivity of NO, and augments NO production in a variety of body processes. The effects are actually synergistic with Vitamin E. Both vitamins are not usually measured, and a reasonable dose of Vitamin C is 500 to 1,000 mg daily. Vitamin E supplementation should be limited to <400 IU per day because of potential adverse long-term health effects of higher doses.
The most common adverse events associated with all of the PDE-5 inhibitors10 are headaches in 16% of men; flushing in 10% of men; dyspepsia (7%); nasal congestion (4%), and visual disturbances/color sensitivity in about 3%. Tadalafil distinguishes itself from vardenafil and sildenafil by the relative lack of visual side effects. It does, however, have an additional possible adverse effect, which is back pain and/or myalgia.11
Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common occurrence in society with a prevalence of about 26 cases per 1,000 patients [1]. This equates to about 150 million cases of ED worldwide. It is a condition where patients are unable to maintain adequate blood flow into their penis to sustain an erection. As a person ages, the probability of having ED grow but no age group is safe from this condition. In a study of Romanian men, it was determined that about 3 percent of males aged 15 to 25, 7 percent of males aged 25 to 45 and 22 percent of males 45 to 65 had ED [2]. Once a man reaches 70, ED can be seen in 84 percent of the elderly. In most cases, ED is a condition that manifests because of a much larger systemic disease. Some of the most common risk factors include cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, tobacco use, hyperlipidemia, metabolic syndrome or depression [3].
If i do attain an erection i feel like im going to loose it (weak erection mainly) has anybody had or heard of a reversal to address erection issues/ erectile dysfunction, and if so has it worked to fix the issues?? Im considering paying for a reversal, just worry it may make my issues worse, whereby i could potentially not get an erection permanently. is anybody aware of a successful reversal to fix erection issues post vasectomy ??
Jelqing is penile massage technique of ancient Arabic origin (52). Men who practise jelqing will stretch their penises while in a semi-erected state and repeatedly milk their penises from base to glans, with their thumb and index finger touching to form an “OK” hand sign around their penile shaft. This massage can be done daily with the aim to achieve greater penile length and harder erections. Unwanted side effects of bruising, pain and fibrosis had been reported. No studies have been done to evaluate the efficacy of jelqing objectively.
Pay attention to your vascular health. High blood pressure, high blood sugar, high cholesterol, and high triglycerides can all damage arteries in the heart (causing heart attack), in the brain (causing stroke), and leading to the penis (causing ED). An expanding waistline also contributes. Check with your doctor to find out whether your vascular system — and thus your heart, brain, and penis — is in good shape or needs a tune-up through lifestyle changes and, if necessary, medications.
Counselling or sex therapy (58% of people find this works for them) –mind-related causes of erectile dysfunction can affect anyone. They are more likely if you experience erectile dysfunction at a younger age. Talking to a counsellor or therapist can help some people overcome erectile dysfunction related to these problems, possibly for good. They can also help you if your erectile dysfunction is causing you stress, as this can make matters worse.
Opioids are used for chronic pain or for recreational use, and there is currently   an epidemic of opioid addiction in the United States. Opioids induce ED by inhibiting gonado-tropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), which leads to a decrease in the production of luteinizing hormone (LH). Decreased levels of LH, in turn, inhibit production of testosterone, which – in both men and women – can cause depression and sexual dysfunction.9
The B vitamin folic acid is good for cardiovascular health. Keeping your blood flowing smoothly is a key to preventing and even treating erectile dysfunction (ED). After all, ED is often an early warning sign of heart problems. In particular, some men have high levels of homocysteine, which can contribute to heart problems. Findings show that eating foods high in folate and taking folic acid supplements may help lower high homocysteine levels. Lots of foods contain folic acid, including spinach, tomatoes, and orange juice. But most of us don’t get enough of these heart healthy foods in our daily diet. To boost folic acid, look for a supplement with about 525 milligrams (mg) of this vitamin. That’s good advice for everyone, and might help with your ED. Research suggests that for some men with ED and high homocysteine levels, taking folic acid may be a key to helping ED medications like Viagra perform well.

Researchers discovered men who regularly consumed flavanoid-rich foods—especially those with anthocyanins, flavones, and flavanones—experienced a significantly reduced risk of the disorder than those who did not. Good news since the foods are already popular in American diets. Lead researcher Aedin Cassidy says, “…the top sources of anthocyanins, flavones and flavanones consumed in the U.S. are strawberries, blueberries, red wine, apples, pears and citrus products.”
ED can be caused by a handful of things, but one thing’s for sure: You need a healthy supply of the neurotransmitter nitric oxide (NO) to get and maintain an erection. NO is produced in nerve tissue and helps jolt your Johnson by relaxing the smooth muscle so blood can fill the penis. After the initial release of NO, your body releases a cascade of chemicals—including more of the neurotransmitter—to help keep you hard and happy, according to a study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
With drug therapy, there’s a risk of side effects such as headaches, back pain or an upset stomach. Before taking any medication for erectile dysfunction it is important to ensure your doctor is ok with that decision. Medication may not work for all men, for instance, if you have diabetes or have previously had prostate surgery. ED medication might also have serious risks if you’re currently taking nitrates (commonly prescribed for chest pain), have heart disease or have low blood pressure.22

Through supplementing with the micronutrients and plant extracts described in this article, and taking advantage of their synergistic effects, many men have found ED can successfully be treated and normal erectile function restored. As always, therefore, if you have any questions about the use of the Cellular Medicine approach, please feel free to contact us.


These drugs facilitate erection by inhibiting the PDE5 enzyme, by blocking the degradation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) in the cavernous smooth muscles. This inhibition results in the prolonged activity of cGMP, which further decreases intracellular calcium concentrations, maintains smooth muscle relaxation and, hence, results in rigid penile erections.
Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common condition characterized by difficulty in getting or maintaining an erection. While the likelihood that a man will experience this problem increases with age, it often occurs alongside and as a result of other conditions such as heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, or prostate disease. As with other health problems, however, the pharmaceutical drugs prescribed by conventional medicine to treat ED can cause serious side effects. Fortunately, therefore, use of the Cellular Medicine approach can help resolve ED safely and naturally.  
Arginine. The amino acid L-arginine, which occurs naturally in food, boosts the body's production of nitric oxide, a compound that facilitates erections by dilating blood vessels in the penis. Studies examining L-arginine's effectiveness against impotence have yielded mixed results. A 1999 trial published in the online journal BJU International found that high doses of L-arginine can help improve sexual function, but only in men with abnormal nitric oxide metabolism, such as that associated with cardiovascular disease. In another study, published in 2003 in the Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy, Bulgarian scientists reported that ED sufferers who took L-arginine along with the pine extract pycnogenol saw major improvements in sexual function with no side effects. Arginine can be helpful, says Geo Espinosa, ND, director of the Integrative Urological Center at NYU Langone Medical Center. Espinosa says that men with known cardiovascular problems should take it only with a doctor's supervision; L-arginine can interact with some medications.
While the rationale behind why it would work is airtight, the research on arginine’s actual effect on erectile dysfunction is slim, points out Charles Walker, M.D., assistant professor of urology and cofounder of the Cardiovascular and Sexual Health clinic at Yale University. But given its solid safety profile, minimal side effects, and potential benefit on heart disease, it’s worth a try, he adds, especially when taken in conjunction with other herbs on this list, which studies have shown can be more effective.

Shindel, A. W., Xin, Z.-C., Lin, G., Fandel, T. M., Huang, Y.-C., Banie, L., … Lue, T. F. (2010, February 5). Erectogenic and neurotrophic effects of icariin, a purified extract of horny goat weed (Epimedium spp.) in vitro and in vivo. The Journal of Sexual Medicine, 7(4), 1518-1528. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1743-6109.2009.01699.x/full

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