If seafood isn’t your thing — or the Casanova Breakfast Plan doesn’t work with your budget — know that fortified breakfast cereals are also good sources of B12. According to the USDA, healthy cereals such as Kellogg’s All-Bran, Special K, Smart Start and Whole Grain Total provide a full day’s allowance. Check the nutrition facts and opt for whole grains, which can help lower cholesterol levels. Having high cholesterol can lead to atherosclerosis, or clogged and constricted arteries, which inhibits blood flow. That’s dangerous for your heart, but guess which artery-rich organ you’ll probably notice it in first?
According to Daneshgari, "Your best bet is to eat a healthy diet that is good for your heart and your circulation." Other foods that are good for your circulation include cranberries, apples, peanuts, onions, tea, and red wine. Chances are, if you take good care of your vascular health, you will avoid many of the common causes of erectile dysfunction.
If you want to go long enough to help your date reach the big O, reach for some oatmeal. The popular breakfast cereal is a good source of l-arginine, an amino acid commonly used to treat erectile dysfunction. Plus, whole grains like oatmeal also help lower cholesterol levels. Having high cholesterol can lead to atherosclerosis, a condition that clogs and narrows arteries, impairing blood flow. This could eventually lead to heart problems, but you’ll likely notice issues below the belt first. The arteries surrounding the genital area are narrower than coronary blood vessels, so they’re more susceptible to clots. Simply put, the better your cholesterol levels are, the better your erection will be, too.

Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common occurrence in society with a prevalence of about 26 cases per 1,000 patients [1]. This equates to about 150 million cases of ED worldwide. It is a condition where patients are unable to maintain adequate blood flow into their penis to sustain an erection. As a person ages, the probability of having ED grow but no age group is safe from this condition. In a study of Romanian men, it was determined that about 3 percent of males aged 15 to 25, 7 percent of males aged 25 to 45 and 22 percent of males 45 to 65 had ED [2]. Once a man reaches 70, ED can be seen in 84 percent of the elderly. In most cases, ED is a condition that manifests because of a much larger systemic disease. Some of the most common risk factors include cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, tobacco use, hyperlipidemia, metabolic syndrome or depression [3].
"This is the first study to look at the association between flavonoids and erectile dysfunction, which affects up to half of all middle-aged and older men," said lead researcher, Professor Aedin Cassidy. "Men who regularly consumed foods high in these flavonoids were less likely to suffer erectile dysfunction. In terms of quantities, we're talking just a few portions a week."
A study in the Journal of Sexual Medicine found that a large percentage of men with ED also have low levels of vitamin D. If you’re experiencing ED, you may want to have your level of vitamin D checked. Other symptoms of a low vitamin D level may be too subtle to notice. However, if you have serious vitamin D deficiency, you may have bone pain or muscle weakness. Vitamin D levels can be checked with a simple blood test and for most people corrected with a supplement.
Erectile dysfunction (ED) is commonly called impotence. It’s a condition in which a man can’t achieve or maintain an erection during sexual performance. Symptoms may also include reduced sexual desire or libido. Your doctor is likely to diagnose you with ED if the condition lasts for more than a few weeks or months. ED affects as many as 30 million men in the United States.
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