The search for a cure for erectile dysfunction (ED) dates back way before the introduction of Viagra in the 1990s. Natural aphrodisiacs, from ground rhinoceros horn topa chocolate, have long been used to increase libido, potency, or sexual pleasure. These natural remedies are also popular because they’re said to have fewer side effects than prescribed medications.
Arginine. The amino acid L-arginine, which occurs naturally in food, boosts the body's production of nitric oxide, a compound that facilitates erections by dilating blood vessels in the penis. Studies examining L-arginine's effectiveness against impotence have yielded mixed results. A 1999 trial published in the online journal BJU International found that high doses of L-arginine can help improve sexual function, but only in men with abnormal nitric oxide metabolism, such as that associated with cardiovascular disease. In another study, published in 2003 in the Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy, Bulgarian scientists reported that ED sufferers who took L-arginine along with the pine extract pycnogenol saw major improvements in sexual function with no side effects. Arginine can be helpful, says Geo Espinosa, ND, director of the Integrative Urological Center at NYU Langone Medical Center. Espinosa says that men with known cardiovascular problems should take it only with a doctor's supervision; L-arginine can interact with some medications.
With the advent of the “little blue pill” men’s sexual health has been thrust into the public eye and now, rather than worrying in embarrassed silence about “performance” issues, men are able to openly seek the help they need to function at their best. This is good news for the 30 million American men who suffer from erectile dysfunction or ED.1 And because 70 percent of ED cases are physiological in nature (it’s not just in your head) and often a sign of some other serious health issue, it is wise to address and correct the underlying physical imbalances that are hindering performance in the first place, ensuring both shortterm happiness and long-term health.
According to Daneshgari, "Your best bet is to eat a healthy diet that is good for your heart and your circulation." Other foods that are good for your circulation include cranberries, apples, peanuts, onions, tea, and red wine. Chances are, if you take good care of your vascular health, you will avoid many of the common causes of erectile dysfunction.
Arginine. The amino acid L-arginine, which occurs naturally in food, boosts the body's production of nitric oxide, a compound that facilitates erections by dilating blood vessels in the penis. Studies examining L-arginine's effectiveness against impotence have yielded mixed results. A 1999 trial published in the online journal BJU International found that high doses of L-arginine can help improve sexual function, but only in men with abnormal nitric oxide metabolism, such as that associated with cardiovascular disease. In another study, published in 2003 in the Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy, Bulgarian scientists reported that ED sufferers who took L-arginine along with the pine extract pycnogenol saw major improvements in sexual function with no side effects. Arginine can be helpful, says Geo Espinosa, ND, director of the Integrative Urological Center at NYU Langone Medical Center. Espinosa says that men with known cardiovascular problems should take it only with a doctor's supervision; L-arginine can interact with some medications.
Aggressive and excessive sexual behaviour is most common cause of ED. Males practicing self-stimulation, coition, or gaining erections without ejaculation few times in a day suffer with problems like ED due to exhausted reproductive system. Tufan herbal ED pills provide natural erectile dysfunction treatment by handling effects of these practices as well. These are regarded as the best ED pills as these not only protect a male from ill-effects of these issues but also reverse their effects to improve health and energy levels of male reproductive system.

Erectile dysfunction can occur as a side effect of medication taken for another health condition. Common culprits are high blood pressure meds, antidepressants, some diuretics, beta-blockers, heart medication, cholesterol meds, antipsychotic drugs, hormone drugs, corticosteroids, chemotherapy, and medication for male pattern baldness, among others.
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