Eating more fruit, vegetables, fish, and less red meat and refined grains can decrease the risk of ED. Maintaining a healthy weight is also important, since men who have a waist that is 42-inches or more are 50 percent more likely to get erectile dysfunction. Obesity increases the risk of vascular disease and diabetes, which are known to contribute to ED.
Nature’s ultimate example of truth in advertising, chili peppers bring the heat. They contain capsaicin, a natural chemical that lends spicy food its pleasurable pain and has serious fat-burning and libido-revving benefits. Research has shown that it boosts testosterone and increases circulation — all good news for your erection and what you do with it. Capsaicin also boosts the release of endorphins, which in turn stimulate desire.
Dr. Niket Sonpal is the Associate Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency at Brookdale Hospital Medical Center in Brooklyn and an Associate Professor at Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine. He's a practicing Gastroenterologist and Hepatologist with a focus on Men's and Women's Health, and a regular contributor to Women's health, Shape and Prevention Magazine.
In fact, one common reason many younger men visit their doctor is to get erectile dysfunction medication. Often, men with erectile dysfunction suffer with diabetes or heart disease, or may be sedentary or obese, but they don’t realize the impact of these health conditions on sexual function. Along with erectile dysfunction treatment, the doctor may recommend managing the illness, being more physically active, or losing weight.
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