Lycopene is one of those phytonutrients that is good for circulation and good for sexual issues. Lycopene is found in deep red fruits like tomatoes and pink grapefruits. Some studies show that lycopene may be absorbed best when mixed with oily foods like avocados and olive oil. So you might want to make yourself an ED-fighting salad. Research also shows that antioxidants like lycopene help fight male infertility and prostate cancer.

I developed joint and muscle pain, periods of extreme fatigue, skin reactions, sun sensitivity, my blood pressure became above normal for the first time in my life, I have developed metabolic syndrome, high blood sugar (as in pre-diabetes), erectile dysfunction, recurring welt-like mouth and cheek sores, lots of gum loss, and bone thinning! I struggle with energy and motivation issues, and I often feel like my lungs burn when I workout or do aerobic exercise.


A study published in the journal Fertility and Sterility that analyzed the effect of various fruit and vegetables on sperm quality discovered carrots had the best all-round results on sperm count and motility — a term used to describe the ability of sperm to swim towards an egg. Men who ate the most carrots saw improved sperm performance by 6.5 to 8 percent. The Harvard researchers attribute the boost to carotenoids, powerful antioxidative compounds in carrots that help the body make vitamin A.
L-arginine. L-arginine is an important amino acid that the body needs to build proteins. Because L-arginine has been shown to improve blood flow, some alternative practitioners have recommended that the supplements be used to treat ED. The Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database, which is a reliable authority on alternative medicines, says L-arginine is possibly effective for treating erectile dysfunction. But Harris warns that "although this supplement could improve blood flow, side effects can be dangerous." L-arginine can cause an allergic reaction or worsen asthma in some people; it can also lower blood pressure.

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The lack of strong scientific proof that vitamin supplementation can improve erectile function doesn’t stop companies from selling vitamins, herbal supplements, and other products with the promise that they will do the job. ED is often treatable with prescription medications or medical procedures, so be careful not to get taken by a manufacturer’s empty promises.

Tiffany La Forge is a professional chef, recipe developer, and food writer who runs the blog Parsnips and Pastries. Her blog focuses on real food for a balanced life, seasonal recipes, and approachable health advice. When she’s not in the kitchen, Tiffany enjoys yoga, hiking, traveling, organic gardening, and hanging out with her corgi, Cocoa. Visit her at her blog or on Instagram.


This treat may have perks below the belt. An ounce a few times a week can help your ticker -- and what’s good for your heart could be good for other parts, too. Chocolate is rich in flavanols, plant nutrients that can increase blood flow and lower blood pressure. It also helps your body make more of nitric oxide, which can help with erections and is in many ED medications.
Experts don't yet know whether the vitamin folic acid (also known as folate) is an effective natural treatment for erectile dysfunction. Research has shown that for some men, taking sildenafil (Viagra) together with folic acid and vitamin B6 seemed to help with erectile dysfunction more than taking medicine alone. Some experts contend that folic acid improves the function of the blood vessels involved in erections. But scientists say they need more studies to know if folic acid helps erectile dysfunction, either alone or in combination with other treatments.
Ginkgo biloba. Known primarily as a treatment for cognitive decline, ginkgo has also been used to treat erectile dysfunction -- especially cases caused by the use of certain antidepressant medications. But the evidence isn't very convincing. One 1998 study published in the Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy found that it did work. But a more rigorous study, published in Human Pharmacology in 2002, failed to replicate this finding. "Ginkgo has come out of fashion in the past few years," says Ronald Tamler, MD, assistant professor of medicine and codirector of the men's health program at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City. "That's because it doesn't do much. I can say that in my practice, I have not seen ginkgo work -- ever."
So, how to increase the sexual potency? Firstly, get rid of bad food habits and revise your diet consuming more foods rich in zinc, protein, vitamins, and essential fatty acids. Often, the opponents of vegetarian diet and raw food diet argue that vegetarianism/veganism and sex are incompatible. Moreover, they assert that abstinence from meat leads to a substantial decrease in male potency. Allegedly, to make a sex life active, the male diet must necessarily include meat. And more is better. In fact, this is not true. The main thing is to ensure that you get all essential nutrients from food. And the foods of plant origin are a great source of these nutrients. Let’s consider the issue in more detail.
Poor sleep patterns can be a contributing factor for erectile dysfunction, Mucher says. One review published in the journal Brain Research emphasized the intricate relationship between the level of sex hormones like testosterone, sexual function, and sleep, noting that testosterone levels increase with improved sleep, and lower levels are associated with sexual dysfunction. Hormone secretion is controlled by the body’s internal clock, and sleep patterns likely help the body determine when to release certain hormones. 
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