The symptoms of erectile dysfunction include difficulty achieving an erection, trouble maintaining an erection, and a reduced interest in sex. Because male sexual arousal is a fairly complex process, it can sometimes be difficult to identify a specific cause. Arousal starts in the brain but it also involves the nerves, muscles, and blood vessels and can be impacted by hormones and emotions. If a problem develops with any of these things, erectile dysfunction could be the consequence.

Regardless of age, if a man is obese and sedentary, with poor dietary habits, he is at greater risk of developing diseases that can lead to erectile dysfunction. These include heart disease, hypertension and type 2 diabetes. Some forms of congenital heart disease may remain hidden and only cause problems in adulthood. Men of any age noticing a marked change in sexual function should contact their physicians to rule out the possibility of a more serious condition.

Erectile dysfunction started to become a household term after scientists discovered a drug to treat it. Nowadays, as anyone who watches TV can attest, there are several different medications for ED. Fifty to 70 percent of men with type 1 or type 2 diabetes respond to a class of drugs—including sildenafil (Viagra), var­denafil hydrochloride (Levitra), and tadalafil (Cialis)—called phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors.


Erectile dysfunction (ED) generally affects men older than 65, but younger men can get it too. If it happens at a younger age, ED may be a warning sign of another health issue. If you have no obvious risk factors and no other health problems, like diabetes, your doctor will run laboratory tests and may order heart tests. The same process that affects the arteries in the penis affects the ones in your heart, too. If something is wrong and it is not diagnosed and treated, you have a fairly high risk over the next four to five years of having some type of cardiac event.
The most common diagnostic test for erectile dysfunction is called penile ultrasound. This test uses sound waves to look for abnormal penile blood supply. Another test that may be done is nocturnal penile tumescence testing, in which a type of computer is attached to the penis to see if nighttime erections are occurring. If a young man is having nighttime erections but can’t get an erection during sex, a psychological cause becomes more likely.
• Blood Vessels: Diabetes damages blood vessels, especially the smallest blood vessels such as those in the penis. Diabetes can also cause heart disease and other circulatory problems. Proper blood flow is absolutely crucial to achieving erection. “Erection is a hydraulic phenomenon that occurs involuntarily,” says Arturo Rolla, MD, of Harvard University School of Medicine. “Nobody can will an erection!” Anything that limits or impairs blood flow can interfere with the ability to achieve an erection, no matter how strong one’s sexual desire.
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