The link between chronic disease and ED is most striking for diabetes. Men who have diabetes are two to three times more likely to have erectile dysfunction than men who do not have diabetes. Among men with erectile dysfunction, those with diabetes may experience the problem as much as 10 to 15 years earlier than men without diabetes. Yet evidence shows that good blood sugar control can minimize this risk. Other conditions that may cause ED include cardiovascular disease, atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), kidney disease, and multiple sclerosis. These illnesses can impair blood flow or nerve impulses throughout the body.
Peyronie's disease is a condition associated with ED. Peyronie's disease is thought to result from minor repetitive trauma to the penis that leads to scarring of the tunica albuginea. It is often associated with a palpable scar in the penis, plaque. The scarring can cause the penis to curve in the direction of the scar, along with painful erections and erectile dysfunction. Some treatments for Peyronie's disease (excision of the plaque and placement of new tissue in its place, grafting) may cause ED also.
If you suffer from erectile dysfunction and you can’t blame it on underlying health conditions, you might feel like your problems are all in your head. While psychological issues may be at the root of your problem, they are just as valid as many physiological causes for ED. Keep reading to learn more about the psychological causes of ED and what you can do to resolve them.
Yet another common erectile dysfunction treatment that can be used in combination with oral drugs is a vacuum pump. This device consists of a plastic cylinder, a pump, a set of constriction bands, and a water-soluble lubricant. The lubricant is applied to the base of the penis to help form an airtight seal. The cylinder is placed over the flaccid penis and held tight against the pelvis. The pump is used to create a vacuum within the cylinder, drawing blood into the penis. Once the penis is engorged with blood, a constriction band is rolled off the cylinder to near the base of the penis. The constriction band is helpful for men with venous leakage, in which blood flows out of the penis as fast as it flows in. However, it should be left on for no more than 30 minutes at a time.
Given the different questions and response options used here, I’d be cautious about concluding that the NSSHB is necessarily registering a rise in ED among young men compared to the aforementioned US study from the 90s. Given that the NSSHB response options allowed for different degrees of severity, it’s likely that this study is detecting more guys who occasionally have mild erectile issues (issues that may not even be significant enough to prompt distress or clinical attention). Also, the NSSHB was bound to produce different figures given that participants only had to think about the most recent time they had sex, as opposed to recalling all sexual experiences over the last year (indeed, thinking only about a single, recent event could make it easier to remember a mild problem that would otherwise be forgotten). For these reasons, the NSSHB data just aren’t directly comparable to the 90s data.

Alcohol abuse is the leading cause of impotence and other disturbances in sexual dysfunction.[3] Episodic erectile failure in alcoholic men is fairly routine, found to be significantly higher in men consuming more than three standard units of alcohol (12 g ethanol) daily and in subjects smoking more than 10 cigarettes/day.[4] Van Thiel and Lester[5] reported that 61% of patients dependent on alcohol reported sexual dysfunction, the most common being erectile dysfunction followed by reduced sexual desire. Erectile dysfunction and reduced sexual desire were frequently seen to be coexisting.[6–9] Vijayasenan,[10] found that of 97 male inpatients admitted for the treatment of alcoholism, 71% suffered from sexual dysfunction for a period of more than 12 months prior to admission to a hospital. The disturbances noted were diminished sexual desire (58%), ejaculatory incompetence (22%), erectile impotence (16%) and premature ejaculation (4%). Virtually all aspects of the human sexual response are affected by alcohol especially sexual desire and erection.[11]
“I’d like to say that men are regularly screened for ED, but when it comes to busy doctors taking care of patients with diabetes, sexual function tends to fall lower on the list of complications,” said Stan Honig, MD,  Director of Men’s Health, Yale School of Medicine. “I’d like to think that every doctor asks every man about sexual function, but I don’t think that’s the case.”

In prescribing sildenafil, a doctor considers the age, general health status, and other medication(s) the patient is taking. The usual starting dose for most men is 50 mg, however, the doctor may increase or decrease the dose depending on side effects and effectiveness. The maximum recommended dose is 100 mg every 24 hours. However, many men will need 100 mg of sildenafil for optimal effectiveness, and some doctors are recommending 100 mg as the starting dose.
Alcohol consumption is a common behavior in social circumstances worldwide. Epidemiological studies have suggested that moderate alcohol consumption reduces cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The cardiovascular protective effects of alcohol may be attributed to its antioxidant, vasorelaxant, and antithrombotic properties, elevation of high-density lipoprotein or increase of nitric oxide production. Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a harbinger of cardiovascular diseases. Most epidemiological studies have also found that alcohol consumption, like its relationship with coronary artery disease, is related to ED in a J-shaped manner, with moderate consumption conferring the highest protection and higher consumption less benefits. In epidemio-logical studies, it is difficult to distinguish the ethanol effects from those of associated confounding factors. Meanwhile, long-term alcohol users, especially in those with alcohol liver disease, are highly associated with ED. More research is needed to investigate the true effects of alcohol consumption on cardiovascular diseases or ED.

Third, men with Diabetes need to control their blood sugar levels. When your blood sugar is not under control, your body does not produce enough Nitric Oxide (NO) and vascular tissues don’t respond as effectively to NO. When enough blood flows into the penis, penile veins close off and block the blood from flowing out. This process results in an erection. If your body does not produce enough NO or if your penile tissues do not respond to NO, the pressure of the blood flowing into your penis is not sufficient to trap the blood, you penis will not get hard.


Multiple authors have demonstrated that anxiety, depression, and stress clearly produce major neurochemical and neuroendocrine changes in the brain (10,11). Changes in neurobiology would be expected to contribute to impaired erectile function. Stress and anxiety lead to increased epinephrine production, and heightened sympathetic tone leads to exaggerated cavernosal smooth muscle contraction, inability of smooth muscle to relax, and subsequent erectile dysfunction (6,7). Failure to achieve a fully rigid erection may aggravate performance anxiety leading to a vicious cycle.
The common PDE5 inhibitor drugs approved in the United States are sildenafil (Viagra), vardenafil (Levitra and Staxyn, the generic form), tadalafil (Cialis), or avanafil (Stendra). All of the currently approved PDE5 inhibitors work in the same way. They differ in the number of available doses, how quickly they work and last in your system, the dosing, and to some extent in the side effects. However, they generally share the same indications and contraindications. Currently, tadalafil is the only medication that patients can take on a daily basis and is approved for the treatment of both ED and BPH (benign enlargement of the prostate).
								   Erectile dysfunction, also known as impotence, is defined as not being able to get or keep an erection firm enough for sex. Remember, occasional erectile dysfunction is not uncommon, but if it’s persistent, erectile dysfunction can be the sign of a more serious health issue, and so you should visit your doctor.Here are 8 surprising causes of erectile dysfunction:High cholesterol. Having a raised cholesterol increases the risk of atherosclerosis where the arteries become narrowed and clogged, resulting in impaired blood flow. When this happens to the arteries in the penis, it can prevent enough blood to create an erection from reaching the penis.Depression. This can cause a lack of interest in sex. See your doctor if this happens to you.Smoking. Smoking causes damage to blood vessels, including those that supply the penis which can result in difficulty in achieving an erection.Cycling. Long hours in the saddle without changing position can cause compression of the perineal nerves and blood vessels, resulting in nerve damage which causes erectile dysfunction. Some saddles are worse than others. If cycling is causing you symptoms of tingling or numbness in your penis, adjust your riding position and take a break.  You might want to look at a different saddle, too. Rodeo riding can have the same effect.Medicines. Erectile dysfunction can be a side-effect of many medicines, including some antipsychotics and antidepressants, cholesterol-lowering medicines, high blood pressure medicines, and epilepsy medicines.Stress. Feelings of stress and anxiety can overflow onto your sex life, and you may find you can’t perform as well as you normally could. 'Performance anxiety' is a common cause of erectile problems.Diabetes. Diabetes raises the risk of erectile dysfunction threefold by its effects on nerves and blood vessels.Peyronie’s disease. This disease causes curvature of the penis due to a hardened area of scar tissue, which results in pain when the man has an erection.If you suffer from erectile dysfunction, don’t be embarrassed – it affects one in 5 men over 40. Remember your doctor can help identify the cause of your erectile dysfunction,  and put you on the path to successful treatment. Read erectile dysfunction – visiting your doctor to find out what to expect when you visit your doctor. Last Reviewed: 18 February 2016 

The vacuum constriction device consists of a vacuum cylinder, various sizes of tension rings, and a vacuum pump, either hand-operated or electric. The penis is placed in a cylinder to which a tension ring is attached. Air is evacuated from the cylinder by means of the pump, creating a vacuum, which produces the erection. The cylinder is removed, leaving the tension ring at the base of the penis to maintain the erection.
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